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Heidi MacFarlan
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I'm just begining my study of UML, XML and Java and wish to integrate those skills with web/database
development directed at building knowlege webs. I have some C++ and ObjectPal, Unix, relational database and SQL in my background but not in a thorough or disciplined manner.
Anyone that can recommend the very best texts and sites to optimize cost/benefit given my goals and background gets a virtual kiss.
Also, I am an economic geographer by training....a pattern
thinker. Those of you who want a more esoteric meta grounding in pattern thinking should read through Christopher Alexander's 'A Pattern Language". This is not a computer text.
 
Avijeet Dash
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That must be a great book to read.
why don't u summerize that to us.
regarding the uml, xml and java, i would suggest u to take up a case study (any web based application for example a online testing s/w like in brainbench.com) and apply all these technologies. on the wrox publication jsp book there are couple of end-to-end acse studies.
good luck buddy.
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Avijeet Dash:
That must be a great book to read.
why don't u summerize that to us.


Hi,
It's amazing how much Alexander's books have been discussed in the software community. Although I don't include his patterns in the Pattern Almanac (get a free copy this week!), I do include a reference to his works and I do mention his contribution.
Christopher Alexander is a building architect (yes, he is still very much alive!) who wrote (with his colleagues) two seminal books on patterns: A Pattern Language, a collection of 253 patterns that describe the solutions to problems in architecture -- all the way from structuring communities to considering the kinds of chairs in a room *and* The Timeless Way of Building, which describes his philosophy of building and why he wrote the pattern language.
Alexander was the keynote speaker at OOPSLA '96. After that speech, I wrote an article for Object magazine, which you might find interesting:
http://www.agcs.com/supportv2/techpapers/patterns/papers/goodsoft.htm

Here are some more URL's with information about Alexander. His work is fascinating and contains important lessons for our field.
http://www.math.utsa.edu/sphere/salingar/Chris.text.html http://g.oswego.edu/dl/ca/ca/ca.html
 
shailesh sonavadekar
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Linda , what about the third book ? I think he is in the process of wrting the third book also ? The S / W community is waiting eagerly for that book. Any idea about that ?
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by shailesh sonavadekar:
Linda , what about the third book ? I think he is in the process of wrting the third book also ? The S / W community is waiting eagerly for that book. Any idea about that ?

There's an expected series of books on the Nature of Order. Alexander is trying to tell us something about beauty and the universal approach we have as humans. We have been waiting for some time now and I believe that the books will appear in 2001. For more information on this fascinating topic:
http://www.math.utsa.edu/sphere/salingar/NatureofOrder.html
Do you believe that software can be beautiful? I wrote an article for Object magazine about this:
http://www.agcs.com/supportv2/techpapers/patterns/papers/goodsoft.htm
My answer is "Yes," I believe that software can be beautiful. What do you think??

Linda

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Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Heidi MacFarlan
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Linda wrote,
>>"Yes," I believe that software can be beautiful. What do you think??
If by beauty we mean the acheivement of design economy, apprehensibility and durability like a pair of Leica Trinovid binolculars, a Bachian Fugue, or DNA...well then, but of course.
comprehensible -all structural elements and processes are
explained in clear concise prose.

 
Kathy Shkarlet
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Linda wrote,
>>"Yes," I believe that software can be beautiful. What do you think??
I consider software engineering akin other methods of creation - one takes 'raw' language (cement) and pre-made libraries (bricks) and starts making a structure! Will it be a 7th wonder of the world or a utility closet? I truly believe that the real mastery makes the result beautiful, which by the way also makes it understandable, maintanable, solid...
Kathy
 
John Wetherbie
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Hi,
What I find most interesting about Alexander's work is how much it has influenced/been adopted by software engineering in contrast to how it has been received in architectural circles. Based on what I have heard and read patterns are much more "important" in software than in architecture.
For a list of the books that Alexander has written or is planning to write go to patternlanguage.com and go to the on-line bookstore.
John
[This message has been edited by John Wetherbie (edited February 02, 2001).]
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Kathy Shkarlet:
Linda wrote,
>>"Yes," I believe that software can be beautiful. What do you think??
I consider software engineering akin other methods of creation - one takes 'raw' language (cement) and pre-made libraries (bricks) and starts making a structure! Will it be a 7th wonder of the world or a utility closet? I truly believe that the real mastery makes the result beautiful, which by the way also makes it understandable, maintanable, solid...
Kathy

There is some talk about a MFA in software engineering. Since we don't seem to do a good job of training our students in a "real" engineering sense and we don't do a good job of treating software development as a craft (there is no master and no apprentice and no studying of masterpieces) -- it's hard to say how we should prepare new entrants into the field. In the MFA there would be resident master programmers and the learner would work under the direction of the master and study great works of software. Most companies have mentors but they typically don't have time to do real mentoring. We turn novices loose to build skyscrapers when they've only built doghouses and then wonder why things don't work.
It's an interesting topic! There are a couple of schools interested in the MFA -- we'll see what happens!

Linda

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Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
John Wetherbie
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Which schools are looking into this?
Thanks,
John
 
scott vincent
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Originally posted by Linda Rising:
I believe that software can be beautiful. What do you think??
[/B]

I like to beleive that software can be beautiful... modelling the simplicity and flow of nature.
Yes, we can all write "ugly" code to get the job done but for the true lovers designing the perfect solution; pattern-model-code-application, may be akin to the perfect golf swing to some (ok, perhaps that's only an analogy I can relate to).
Yes, I can see the beauty in it.
Scott
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by John Wetherbie:
Which schools are looking into this?
Thanks,
John

I'm not sure Dick Gabriel (who wrote the proposal) ever mentioned the names -- he just said he had talked to folks at two schools and they were interested. I'll see if I can find out for you.

Linda

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Linda Rising
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Linda Rising
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Originally posted by scott vincent:
I like to beleive that software can be beautiful... modelling the simplicity and flow of nature.
Yes, we can all write "ugly" code to get the job done but for the true lovers designing the perfect solution; pattern-model-code-application, may be akin to the perfect golf swing to some (ok, perhaps that's only an analogy I can relate to).
Yes, I can see the beauty in it.
Scott

I agree :-)! I wrote an article about this after Christopher Alexander's keynote at OOPSLA '96:
http://www.agcs.com/supportv2/techpapers/patterns/papers/goodsoft.htm

Linda
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Linda Rising
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Linda Rising
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Originally posted by John Wetherbie:
Which schools are looking into this?
Thanks,
John

I just heard back from Dick Gabriel. The schools are: University of Maryland, Baltimore County Campus and University of Chicago.
Linda

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Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Mark Herschberg
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Linda wrote:

There are a couple of schools interested in the MFA -- we'll see what happens!

What exactly is the MFA? Museams of Fine Arts model with apprectices? What do the schools hope to accomplish?
I ask because I talk I'm giving at MIT this Thursday caught the attention of the professor teaching the software engineering course. He's been revising the curriculum to bring it more up to date (e.g. last semester they finally had lectures on patterns and refactoring). I'm going to be talking to him shortly about my thoughts on an undergraduate CS education.
--Mark
hershey@vaultus.com
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Linda wrote:
What exactly is the MFA? Museams of Fine Arts model with apprectices? What do the schools hope to accomplish?
--Mark
hershey@vaultus.com

In a nutshell, the Master of Fine Arts in Software would be like a Master of Fine Arts in any other discipline. You're right -- students would be apprenticed to a master and study masterpieces -- creations by masters. There's more to it but that's the idea.
Linda

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Linda Rising
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Linda Rising
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Originally posted by John Wetherbie:
Hi,
What I find most interesting about Alexander's work is how much it has influenced/been adopted by software engineering in contrast to how it has been received in architectural circles. Based on what I have heard and read patterns are much more "important" in software than in architecture.
John
[This message has been edited by John Wetherbie (edited February 02, 2001).]

Hi John,
I can recall several occasions when I gave talks about patterns and afterwards someone in the audience would come up and say something about using Alexander's books to build a house or add on to an existing house. Once in Colorado, a woman said that she was building a new house and her architect gave her a copy of Alexander's "A Pattern Language" and said that would ensure they were speaking the same language :-)!
Here's a recent article about Alexander in the real world!
http://www.boston.com/globe/magazine/9-24/featurestory2.shtml
Enjoy!
Linda

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Linda Rising
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John Wetherbie
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Hi, Linda!
So you're still hanging around here?
It is good to hear that Alexander's principles are being put to use in their original medium. My impression was mainly based on a number of articles I read years ago that pointed out that patterns were more of a hot topic in software engineering than in architecture.
John
 
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< - cool
Linda, please, do not leave us, we are already addicted to your posts
 
Thomas Paul
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I am about 2/3 through it, but I can heartily recommend CT Arrington's book, "Enterprise Java with UML".
 
shailesh sonavadekar
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Thomas , The book you have mentioned is not for patterns. lot of good uml text is there in the book in the perspective of Enterprise java. I have just started that. Right now , I can not comment on this. Only I can say that it is not pattern book.
Heidi , just check other threads in which a lot of discussion is going on about good Patterns book.
Your Friendly Bartender
Shailesh.
 
Anonymous
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Reading your posts about courses in Software Engineering, here in the UK I am studying BSc Software Engineering and in the first year many modules involved studying other groups of engineers(mechanical, civil...etc) and how they designed learnt from failure. It was very instructive for looking at a problem and analysising it, and seems to produce people who have a far greater grasp of how to solve programming problems than pure computer scientists.
 
Frank Carver
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I'd agree with that. My first degree was in "Computer Systems Engineering" which seemed to cover everything that the Engineering [i/and[/i] Comp Sci students did. We all found the breadth of the course to be hard but very useful. The development of software can be engineering, but often isn't.
 
Pete Cassetta
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Heidi,
Seems like most of the interesting posts in reply to your question went a different direction.
The only two cents I have to contribute is that Bruce Eckel has done a book called "Thinking in Patterns in Java" (it might still be in progress, but it's mostly done). I can't really recommend it, since I haven't read it, but he is a fabulously clear writer and a true educator. His Thinking in Java 2 gets high praise here and elsewhere (I have read that one). He's very much into Patterns and Java, and does some work with UML, though I don't know how deeply his patterns book goes into UML. Anyway, the entire book is available as a free download from his Web site, so you can take a look and see if it would be helpful to you without having to shell out any $$$:
http://www.bruceeckel.com
 
Thomas Paul
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Thomas , The book you have mentioned is not for patterns.

I know but the original question (the first post) was asking about integrating UML and Java. There wasn't a single word about patterns.
 
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