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Pattern Books

 
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Hi,
Tell me what pattern books you personally own (not a company reference that you use or something from a library). I hope at least one person will mention the Pattern Almanac :-)! If not,
I know some of you will win a copy this week!

Linda

------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
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Hmmm... I am pretty new to patterns... but a couple of days ago I picked up a copy of AntiPatterns - Refactoring Software, Architectures, and Projects in Crisis by Brown, Malveau, McCormick and Mowbray at a used book sale for ~$1 (!) I don't know how good it is yet, since I have been reading the RHE certification book recently and have just been able to flip throgh AntiPatterns. However, I would love to win a copy of The Pattern Almanac 2000! I have just been introduced to this new concept and want all the material I can get!
Thanks,
-Nate
 
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What I have?
GOF Design Patterns, Mark Grand's Patterns in Java, and Thinking in Patterns.
I hope to get a copy of your book if possible.
 
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Linda , is this question open for all ?
1 ) GOF Patterns Book
2 ) Java Design Patterns
3 ) PLoP volumes
4 ) Pattern Hatching
5 ) Mark Grand's Patterb Book ( Vol. i )
The list is endless. But, I would like to have your book.
Your Friendly Bartender
Shailesh.
 
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1. Design Patterns - GoF
2. Thinking in Patterns - Bruce Eckel
...
(at the end of this week )
3. Pattern Almanac 2000 - Linda Rising
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Nathan Pruett:
Hmmm... I am pretty new to patterns... but a couple of days ago I picked up a copy of AntiPatterns - Refactoring Software, Architectures, and Projects in Crisis by Brown, Malveau, McCormick and Mowbray at a used book sale for ~$1 (!)
Thanks,
-Nate



Hi Nate,
Wow! I don't think I've ever found a pretty good technical book for $1 :-)!
There's a lot of debate in the patterns community about antipatterns. My feeling is that if it helps, let's use it :-)! The antipatterns are not in the current edition of the Almanac (I had to stop before I could include them) -- but they will be in the next edition in 2002.
Antipatterns are pretty good about telling you what *not* to do but sometimes they're a little weak about telling you what *to* do :-)!

Enjoy!
Linda

------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Laojar Chuger:
What I have?
GOF Design Patterns, Mark Grand's Patterns in Java, and Thinking in Patterns.
I hope to get a copy of your book if possible.


Thanks for the list!
How useful do you find Mark Grand's? I didn't get to include those in the almanac (schedule driven!) but they're on my shelf now :-)!

Linda

------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
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Originally posted by shailesh sonavadekar:
Linda , is this question open for all ?
1 ) GOF Patterns Book
2 ) Java Design Patterns
3 ) PLoP volumes
4 ) Pattern Hatching
5 ) Mark Grand's Patterb Book ( Vol. i )
The list is endless. But, I would like to have your book.
Your Friendly Bartender
Shailesh.


Howdy Bartender!
I'd like a tall sasparilla :-)!
Are these books you personally own or books you'd *like* to own??
Linda
 
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Originally posted by Tony Chen:
1. Design Patterns - GoF
2. Thinking in Patterns - Bruce Eckel
...
(at the end of this week )
3. Pattern Almanac 2000 - Linda Rising


Hi,
I've heard good things about Bruce Eckel's book. They didn't make the deadline for the Almanac either but they'll be in the 2002 edition.
Do you find his book useful???

Linda


------------------
Linda Rising
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I, too, am new to patterns... at least the implementation of patterns. So, I'm taking someone else's advice, and trying to learn more about patterns through non-software examples. Anyway, I'm planning to read "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Volume 2: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects" by Schmidt, Stal, Rohnert, Buschmann. The book takes a more systems approach rather than a component approach. Does anyone have any comments on this book?
 
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Originally posted by Glen Tanner:
I, too, am new to patterns... at least the implementation of patterns. So, I'm taking someone else's advice, and trying to learn more about patterns through non-software examples. Anyway, I'm planning to read "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Volume 2: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects" by Schmidt, Stal, Rohnert, Buschmann. The book takes a more systems approach rather than a component approach. Does anyone have any comments on this book?


Hi,
Real world, non-software examples are an excellent way to learn and to remember patterns. I gave this URL in another message but it's worth repeating:
http://www.agcs.com/supportv2/techpapers/patterns/papers/tutnotes/index.htm
The POSA2 book is excellent but it's a tough way to start! The book assumes that you already understand the GoF patterns and POSA1. I repeat, it's excellent but a challenge for beginners!
Let me know how you like it!

Linda

------------------
Linda Rising
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I'm glad you posted this question. I hope other responders will not only list their books, but will also give a few words of assessment, and how they have used the books.
I'm pretty new to patterns. I started with "Design Patterns (GoF)", and felt right off that the book read like a classic. To me, it showed a deep understanding by the authors, and was all the more impressive because it was so early in the game. I didn't grasp it all the first time through, and I plan to go back through it another time or two. I was able to immediately relate to some areas, but not to others. The examples being in C++ was certainly not my first choice, but, overall that wasn't as important as their thorough explanations. I'm sure more lucid books will come (or maybe already have), but, for me it's a worthwhile read because of its early insights and historical significance.
I also have a downloaded copy of Eckel's book. I've referred to it several times, for two reasons. One is to get a 2nd discussion of a pattern. I've found this useful, but often find his coverage superficial. I've also used his book simply to see his Java specific code. Overall, I'm glad I downloaded the book, but I will certainly broaden my search when I lay out cash for a Java Patterns book.
I hope your book is stocked at the local B&N. I'd like to check it out next time I'm there.
Ron
 
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Originally posted by Ron Olson:
I'm glad you posted this question. I hope other responders will not only list their books, but will also give a few words of assessment, and how they have used the books.

Ron


Hi Ron,
That's one of the valuable uses of a forum like this (in fact, that's what patterns are all about!) -- sharing experiences. Tell me what you think and I'll tell you what I think and we'll both get better :-)!
A book like the Almanac has to be created in an eXtreme fashion. I should only be a mirror of what's out there. Tell me what you think and I'll try to reflect that as best I can. Then you can look in the mirror and see what work needs to be done on the current state of the world. For this really to work, of course, it must be on-line, it must be open source. That is the next step and Addison-Wesley has promised me that this will happen. You'll still need the hard copy (interesting statistic -- on-line books sell better!) for a quick look-up but the on-line version will let the reader see how patterns are related, how they work together, that's the ultimate goal!
Enjoy!
Linda
------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Glen Tanner
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Thanks for the URL, I went through the slides and that was exactly what I needed. The real world examples will help me to remember the patterns. I want to learn to recognize if/when a pattern will solve a problem, so that I don't fall into the trap of trying to force a solution on a problem just because the solution is a "cool" pattern.
Thanks again!
 
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In my opinion, GOF is a really good catalog of patterns. It gives you very good understanding and very broad sense of patterns. Then PLOPD volumes are a great treasure upon those more basic books. For example you can find a great discussion on State pattern in vol. 3 where you will know some design issues when implementing that pattern. They are really good.
Akin Kaldiroglu
 
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Originally posted by Glen Tanner:
Thanks for the URL, I went through the slides and that was exactly what I needed. The real world examples will help me to remember the patterns. I want to learn to recognize if/when a pattern will solve a problem, so that I don't fall into the trap of trying to force a solution on a problem just because the solution is a "cool" pattern.
Thanks again!


You're welcome, Glen! Maybe you can add some examples of your own! It's a fun exercise!
Linda


------------------
Linda Rising
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In addition to the GOF book, I just bought the architecture book that inspired the GOF to start their project, namely
The Timeless Way of Building
Christopher Alexander
Oxford University Press, 1979 ISBN 0-19-502402-8
and
A Pattern Language 1977 ISBN 0-19-501919-9
Very thought provoking books indeed - read them if you are thinking of buying or building a house.
Bill
 
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Pattern books on my shelf:
- Design Patterns (GoF)
- Design Patterns (the GoF book in Java, someone borrowed this, so I don't recall the title, and can't look it up)
- Patterns in Java Vol I (Grand)
- Patterns in Java Vol II (Grand)
- Anti-Patterns
- Pattern Hatching (Vlissides)
- Refactoring (which can be cosnidered a book of patterns for changing code)
URLs: http://hillside.net/patterns/ http://c2.com/ppr/index.html http://www.industriallogic.com/papers/learning.html

I didn't know about your book until this week, but now I want to get a copy :-)

--Mark
hershey@vaultus.com
 
shailesh sonavadekar
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quoted by linda rising
"
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by shailesh sonavadekar:
Linda , is this question open for all ?
1 ) GOF Patterns Book
2 ) Java Design Patterns
3 ) PLoP volumes
4 ) Pattern Hatching
5 ) Mark Grand's Patterb Book ( Vol. i )
The list is endless. But, I would like to have your book.
Your Friendly Bartender
Shailesh.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Howdy Bartender!
I'd like a tall sasparilla :-)!
Are these books you personally own or books you'd *like* to own??
Linda
"
Hi , Linda , this is Shailesh here. Yahh , I have those volumes on my shelf. The thing is that the volumes of the PLoP ( Vol. 2 , 3 , 4 ) are no t easily available in India. I have only vol. 1 of the book. I am searching For Mark Grand's vol. 2.
I have also have electronic version of " Thinking In Patterns" . No time to read.
Some thing I would like to add, if you permit. The originator of the Patterns is considred as Christopher Alexander , Architect / Civil Engg. He has written the book on the patterns in 1977. The year may not be correct. But , the entire s/w industry is taking inspiration from him. He has written two epic volume , which are must read for all the pattern enthusiasts.
What you mean by " Howdy Bartender " ?
Shailesh.
[This message has been edited by shailesh sonavadekar (edited February 01, 2001).]
 
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Hi,
I noticed that nobody mentioned the book "Applying UML and patterns" by Larman. I have it and (bowing to GoF and other great people around)I think it's an overall best! He carries a case study through most of the book showing OO method, UML and patterns in all their glory. He also comes up with General Responsibility Assignment Software Patterns (GRASP)which I have printed out and glued on the side of the monitor. If you have time budget or a strong desire to learn - get this book!
Kathy Shkarlet
 
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Linda,
That sounds great - I agree that the web is probably the best medium for such a book. I have not heard of your book before, but it sounds very interesting. I can hardly believe that you have identified and catalogued over 2000 patterns!
The only books I have are the classig GoF "Design Patterns" and Mark Grand's "Patterns in Java Vol. 1", even though I have not read this yet. I really liked the GoF book, which I read a few months ago. I have not had a chance to apply many of the patterns yet, but I do recognize them here and there.
Apart from the GoF book which probably everybody interested in patterns should read, which pattern books would you recommend specifically to Java developers, or possibly for web application developers?
-Mirko

Originally posted by Linda Rising:
...
A book like the Almanac has to be created in an eXtreme fashion. I should only be a mirror of what's out there. Tell me what you think and I'll try to reflect that as best I can. Then you can look in the mirror and see what work needs to be done on the current state of the world. For this really to work, of course, it must be on-line, it must be open source. That is the next step and Addison-Wesley has promised me that this will happen. You'll still need the hard copy (interesting statistic -- on-line books sell better!) for a quick look-up but the on-line version will let the reader see how patterns are related, how they work together, that's the ultimate goal!
Enjoy!
Linda
[/B]


 
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Now, there's a book I actually own. He also is an excellent speaker!
 
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GOF Design Patterns - but I've been told that as an OO beginner, I will get very confused if I try to tackle it yet. :-)
 
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Originally posted by William Brogden:
In addition to the GOF book, I just bought the architecture book that inspired the GOF to start their project, namely
The Timeless Way of Building
Christopher Alexander
Oxford University Press, 1979 ISBN 0-19-502402-8
and
A Pattern Language 1977 ISBN 0-19-501919-9
Very thought provoking books indeed - read them if you are thinking of buying or building a house.
Bill


Thanks for mentioning these, Bill! These are wonderful books! I know, I know, you're thinking you don't have enough time to read the technical books you need to read -- but these books are treasures you'll keep and read your whole life.
Christopher Alexander is a building architect who was a keynote speaker at OOPSLA '96. Check out:
http://www.agcs.com/supportv2/techpapers/patterns/papers/goodsoft.htm
for a paper I wrote after that conference. Imagine -- an architect giving the keynote to a couple of thousand OO developers :-)!
Enjoy!
Linda

------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Mirko Froehlich:
Linda,

Apart from the GoF book which probably everybody interested in patterns should read, which pattern books would you recommend specifically to Java developers, or possibly for web application developers?
-Mirko



Hi Mirko,
After the GoF book, the POSA1 book -- which presents architectural patterns is a good choice. After that I would concentrate on patterns in a particular domain. The Almanac is a good way to find those patterns -- they might be found in a book or a series of articles.
The PLoP books have been mentioned but they contain collections of patterns from several domains and are not as useful for beginners. I'm working on a collection of patterns for telecommunications software that should be out soon. This is the wave of the future for patterns -- text books that target a specific domain. For instance, James Nobel and Charles Weir have a new book on patterns for systems with limited memory.
So, in summary, get the GoF or a GoF clone, then POSA1, then a domain-specific book, if it is available. In the meantime, there are lots of papers on patterns in specific domains -- study those to see how developers are using patterns to solve problems in your area.
Thanks for the good question!

Linda


------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
Mirko Froehlich
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Linda,
Thanks for the tip - I'll definitely take a look at POSA1 next.
-Mirko
 
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Hi Linda Rising,

Im new to patterns.I heard that good OOA & OOD can make us to draw Object model using patterns. Is it enough to enter into patterns if we have good OO stuff. How long it will take us to adopt all the pattern behaviours to apply in real time projects.How far all these 23 patterns present in GoF book is applicable in prjs.
Is there any resource, book or site(i prefer site link) which gives description along with the example(i prefer Java as a lang.) of each of 23 patterns or more.

Anil


[This message has been edited by Anil Vupputuri (edited February 01, 2001).]
 
Linda Rising
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Originally posted by Anil Vupputuri:
Hi [b]Linda Rising,
Is there any resource, book or site(i prefer site link) which gives description along with the example(i prefer Java as a lang.) of each of 23 patterns or more.

Anil
Hi,
Here are a few sites you might find interesting:
http://www.meurrens.org/ip-Links/java/designPatterns/ http://www.labsoftware.com/Patterns/
This is a web site with pointers to several other places where you can find more information:
http://hem.passagen.se/gumby/cs/patterns.html
If these are helpful, you might share that with the others on this thread -- what you like is a good guide for others!
Enjoy!
Linda

[This message has been edited by Anil Vupputuri (edited February 01, 2001).][/B]



------------------
Linda Rising
Author of The Pattern Almanac 2000
 
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Thinking in Patterns!
But I'm hoping to be the lucky one to win your book!
 
Anil Vupputuri
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Originally posted by Linda Rising:


Thanks Linda Rising
Its really good links to have.How often u visit this site.Is there any discussion form where u involve and clear doubts on patterns.
Thx
Anil
 
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Originally posted by Anil Vupputuri:

Originally posted by Linda Rising:
[b]


Thanks Linda Rising
Its really good links to have.How often u visit this site.Is there any discussion form where u involve and clear doubts on patterns.
Thx
Anil
[/B]


There's a listserver devoted to patterns topics of all kinds called "patterns discussion." For more information on this and other patterns listservers see:
http://hillside.net/patterns/Lists.html

Enjoy!
Linda


------------------
Linda Rising
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Volume 1 of Mark Grand series is very good. The second one really isn't design patterns per se. It seems more like a best practices book. I mean "The Lookup Table" pattern? I don't know how useful that is, except that repetition is the mother of skill, so it can't hurt to go over things you already know.
 
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Instant UML is an older interesting book. I've read it twice and still can't figure out how it is supposed to be organized!!! Don't buy it.
 
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Thinking in Patterns is a good book.
I really like the title of the book "Enterprise Java with UML" by CT Arrington which seems to deal with real world problems even though I don't have the book yet.
Faisal
 
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I have started reading "Java Design Patterns" by James Cooper. But it looks as though I would be in the need of a couple of good books to get a thorough understanding of design patterns.
 
Anil Vupputuri
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UML Distilled by Martin Flower is good one for UML.
Object Oriented Analysis & Design by Grady Booch,Robert C Martin is very good book for OOAD and UML.
Anil
 
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Originally posted by Linda Rising:

I'm working on a collection of patterns for telecommunications software that should be out soon. This is the wave of the future for patterns -- text books that target a specific domain. For instance, James Nobel and Charles Weir have a new book on patterns for systems with limited memory.
Linda


Linda,
When is your book/article on "patterns for telecommunications software" going to be available ? Are there any existing links?
Can you please provide links/books for patterns in the other vertical industries like Finance...
Looking forward to read your book.
Thanks
Gul
 
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I am troubled:
I am thinking of buying two OO Design books and while considering which would be the best to start off with considering I have beginner/intermediate knowledge presentyly, I found this review on Amazon regarding Design Patterns:
"Reviewer: A reader from India
If there is one single book that covers a wonderful topic and is absolutely unreadable, this is the one. I saw so many favourable reviews of this book that I almost started thinking that there was something wrong with me. Then I met some guys, who like me, attempted to read the book umpteen number of times and then gave up.
This is one of those 'classics'. You know what a classic is: books that everybody praises but nobody reads. Trust me, most of the people singing praises of this book here never read more than 5 pages. They were not able to.
Still this book continues to sell. Why ? Because there is no alternative. It adorns millions of bookshelves, remaining one of the most rarely read software books."

Does anyone agree?
OP
 
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I have to laugh when I read reviews like that. He is basically saying that he didn't understand it so he gave up. Yes, it is a difficult book... in fact it is extremely difficult. The way I attacked this book is that I spent a day with each pattern trying to work them into real life examples from my experince and coding up some Java samples. By the end of this excecise I felt transformed. Suddenly I was seeing patterns everywhere. The fact is that if this book was an easy read I would never have spent so much time on it and would never have learned it so well.
 
Thomas Paul
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"Still this book continues to sell. Why ? Because there is no alternative. It adorns millions of bookshelves, remaining one of the most rarely read software books."

He may be right. Everyone owns a copy of Knuth's books but how many actually read them? Oh well, more's the pity. If we treated our profession as a serious profession, books like "Design Patterns" would be required reading for every apprentice.
 
We find this kind of rampant individuality very disturbing. But not this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
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