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Code generation using Class Diagrams in Rose

 
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A client is asking us to generate Code (Java) from the Class Diagrams in Rose. From my previous experience using Rose, I find that generation of code from Rose, kind of tends to messy, especially if the design/class hierarchy structure changes, then code would have to be re-generated.
Has anybody used Rose to generate code and found it useful for further development / construction of the entire application(s)? If yes, please share some of your experiences/gotchas and also did you encounter the scenario described above ( code re-generation ).
Please throw some light on this topic.
Appreciate your input.
Thanks.
 
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I am only slightly familiar with Rose's code generation capabilities. IMO, it would take a really sophisticated user of Rose to get the full benefits of the code generation it provides. That is, you really have to use Rose as more of a CASE tool. This would imply having a higher level of formality and definition of your development process, perhaps an organization with a CMM level 3 or higher.
If you are working in an environment where the development process is not at that level of sophistication and/or using Rose merely as a tool for making UML diagrams and not going into the fine details of the design, then I would recommend that you just use to it generate the initial skeleton code for your classes.
 
Suresh Ray
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Thanks.

I have another question which is with respect to the steps for systematic approach for designing an entire system.
In my opinion, given user requirements, one would start with the following :
Using VISIO, High level Functional Flow diagrams ( broken down into Level 1 thru 4, depending on the complexity of the system, level 4 being most detailed ).
Then start with (specific to ROSE) in this order :
Use case Diagrams
Sequence Diagrams
Class Diagrams
StateChart Diagrams
Collobaration Diagrams
Please suggest if the approach can be different at any of these steps and the possible alternative to this approach.
Appreciate your reply.
[ January 10, 2002: Message edited by: Suresh Ray ]
 
Junilu Lacar
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Suresh,
Do you intend to generate all those artifacts for each aspect of the design?
Don't get carried away with making diagrams. What's important is quality, not quantity. Remember, diagrams are only a means of communicating the important aspects of the system: the ones that lead you to make major design decisions. Leave the nitty-gritty details to the code (from XP: the code is the design).
Read Martin Fowler's "UML Distilled". In it, he says that he favors lightweight techniques with less ceremony. To paraphrase Fowler: In the end, what the client really needs is code, not piles of documentation. Of course, the larger your organization, the more ceremony you will need so try to find out just how much (or how little) documentation you can get by with.
Craig Larman's book "Applying UML and Patterns" also provides a good outline process and tells you what artifacts are produced at various stages of development.
HTH,
Junilu
 
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Hi!
ArcStyler, an Architectural-IDE that
encapsulates Rose (etc.) meets all of your
requirements: http://www.ArcStyler.com
Also see: www.ConvergentArchitecture.com
ciao!
 
Suresh Ray
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Thanks Junilu for the suggestions.
ArcStyler seems to be a good product. Thanks Richard, for the link. I will try to explore on using this product in the project.
Regards,
Suresh
 
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