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UML tools, XMI import/export

 
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Three multi-part questions:
1) Which UML diagramming tool do you use?
2) Do you use it to:
a) diagram, then write Java code in an IDE and use the diagrams for reference
b) diagram, then use it to generate Java source to work with and use the diagrams as reference
c) diagram, generate Java source, then round-trip-engineer it using a Java IDE and maintain up-to-date diagrams
d) diagram, generate Java source, and use built-in IDE to code, build, deploy, etc. (all-in-one-tool ala TogetherCC)
3) Do you have and do you use/have you used an XMI import/export feature to move the model between various tools? Did it work?
My answers:
1) Describe at work, ArgoUML at home
2) b. - eventually will reverse-engineer code for final diagrams
3) No - that's why I'm asking *you*! I've heard Rational's XMI is bad. True?
Thanks!
 
Gerry Giese
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Additional interesting question: which software process do you use with your UML tool? Do you use Rose/RUP, Agile/XP, old-fashioned waterfall, or a roll-your-own corporate process?
 
Gerry Giese
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Weird. I had expected at least a few people to reply to this thread. What's so uninteresting about it? Is it me???
 
Gerry Giese
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OK, I've decided that I'm not getting any replies because I'm too late to the game with UML -- nobody uses it anymore! All these new 'agile' and XP techniques advocate just getting a buddy, writing tests, and coding, so there's never any need to do a UML model. I just can't seem to stay current on the newest techniques. Everyone else moves on just as I figure out what the last great thing was! Right??
 
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Originally posted by Gerry Giese:
OK, I've decided that I'm not getting any replies because I'm too late to the game with UML -- nobody uses it anymore! All these new 'agile' and XP techniques advocate just getting a buddy, writing tests, and coding, so there's never any need to do a UML model. I just can't seem to stay current on the newest techniques. Everyone else moves on just as I figure out what the last great thing was! Right??


I would guess it is becauseof the subject you choose. I haven't read this thread till now simply because I know nothing about XMI import/export at all...
To answer your questions:
1) Whiteboards/Pen'n'Paper. Didn't find a good tool for persisting diagrams yet; tried Rational Rose, Together and ArgoUml. Heard good things about Whiteboard Photo.
2) e) Communicate design issues whenever pure prose isn't effective enough. Never used automatic generation either way.
3) no
AIQ) moving from no process to agile/XP
 
Gerry Giese
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THANK YOU for replying!!
I was going to single-handedly make this thread a 'hot topic' until somebody said SOMETHING.
So you thought that the comma meant that the topics were one and the same and you didn't know anything about it? I had meant the comma to show that there were two separate yet related topics. Next time I will post two different messages.
Interesting answers. I suspected as much. I'm noticing a trend away from using tools. I just read an article suggesting 10 reasons to dump your IDE and just use a text editor. Do you feel that automation 'gets in the way' of true understanding and productivity, as that article proposes? I think that it can in some cases, but not all, and the baby can be thrown out with the bathwater. A good UML diagramming tool with decent code generation seems like something worth starting with, but not necessarily something to finish with (except for reverse-engineering code to product documentation for the managers...).
Thanks again!
 
Ilja Preuss
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THANK YOU for replying!!


You're welcome!

So you thought that the comma meant that the topics were one and the same and you didn't know anything about it? I had meant the comma to show that there were two separate yet related topics. Next time I will post two different messages.


Yes. That would probably help...

I'm noticing a trend away from using tools. I just read an article suggesting 10 reasons to dump your IDE and just use a text editor. Do you feel that automation 'gets in the way' of true understanding and productivity, as that article proposes? I think that it can in some cases, but not all, and the baby can be thrown out with the bathwater.


I read this article, too, and I think the author is wrong. Though I am not a fan of automatic generation of code from diagrams or a GUI builder, there are other ways an IDE can help.
I am currently a user of the Eclipse IDE (http://www.eclipse.org) and it definitely is boosting my performance. This is because of the many *tiny little* things it automates - features like the refactoring browser (e.g. to extract a method), code assist, quick fix (for correcting a misspelled identifier or creating a called method), powerfull language-aware search facility (e.g. searching for all write accesses to a field), instant compilation and easy navigation (e.g. hot key for "go to declaration"), to just name a few.
I have to agree, though, that you probably should *start* by using the plain JDK and a text editor, just to get a grip about the basics of the language.
The author is also right that my working style is getting somewhat dependend on the IDE - in fact, I would miss it heavily. That is why I use it, after all...

A good UML diagramming tool with decent code generation seems like something worth starting with, but not necessarily something to finish with (except for reverse-engineering code to product documentation for the managers...).


For me, the most effective diagrams are those only partly reflecting the code, focusing on the abstractions I am currently communicating about. It seems to me that the creation of these diagrams *cannot* be automated.
Regarding documentation for managers, I once heard a tale of a software engineer who just reassembled the documentations of previous projects into one for the current - and got awarded for his exemplary work... :roll:
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?UnifiedModelingLanguage has some interesting links on the subject, btw
 
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