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What UML books would you recommend?

 
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Obviously, "Enterprise Patterns" is at the top of the list (and I'm definitely interested in reading it).
But what other books would you recommend for somebody interested in UML? What do you think about Martin Fowler's "UML Distilled" or Craig Larman's "Applying UML and Patterns" (for somebody interested in "the basics"), or "Eclipse Modeling Framework"?
In other words, for those of us interested in "Enterprise Patterns", what other books might you recommend as supplemental reading?
 
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UML Distilled is good one. UML patterns by Craig Larmann talks more about patterns rather than UML diagrams.
 
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Fowler's book UML distilled illustrates the basic UML diagrams; while Larman's book Applying UML and Patterns illustrates the OOAD life cycle and interations using an example over his book. He gives details explanations for each steps and each iteration in his book.
In addition, you may consider the book:
Core J2EE� Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies, Second Edition, By Deepak Alur, John Crupi, Dan Malks
It covers most of the enterprise patterns.
Nick
 
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This is a good book, too, though it doesn't cover UML2.0.
Remember that I have found there some good explanations about the more subtle points of UML:
... and its by authors.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0201770601/qid=1082544083/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-7179032-5676959?v=glance&s=books
This book is a lot more UML-focussed than Larmans book (which I like to own, but I found difficult to follow during first read).
Its more detailed than Fowlers book.
[ April 21, 2004: Message edited by: Axel Janssen ]
 
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Obviously, "Enterprise Patterns" is at the top of the list (and I'm definitely interested in reading it).


Great! This is quite an advanced book, and it is about patterns modeled in UML rather than UML syntax. You should find the patterns useful - even if a pattern only saves you a man-day of work, the book has paid for itself!
For straight UML, there are a few books that I reccommend:
UML and the Unified Process - this is our first book. Before writing Enterprise Patterns we wanted to write a really good book on how to use UML effectively. It currently supports UML 1.5, but that's OK as most tools still only support UML 1.5. We will have a UML 2 edition out later this year. We also have a complete training course based on the book that is available for commercial licensing or free to Universities.
Advanced Use Case Modeling - I think this is an essential book. I really wish I had written it!
UML 2 Toolkit - if you want to know about UML 2, this is much more detailed than UML Distilled. It is also syntactically more accurate. A minor problem I have with UML Distilled is that it contains a suprising amount of non-standard syntax clearly labelled "non-normative" so that you can ignore it. I don't see the point of including non-standard stuff.
 
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Hi Jim,
I am quite interested in your book: Advanced Use Case Modeling.
Could you tell me how advanced it is? Up to now, I know there are 2 pharses for Use Case Modeling. The 1st pharse is the specification pharse, which tries to model to system with real life objects, without any implementation/coding/performance issues.
The 2nd pharse is the design pharse, which try to modify the specification use cases into design use cases, and update those UML diagrams.
Which pharse your book focus in? or even both? In addition, what is the difference between your book and Use Case Driven Modeling?
Thanks.
Nick
 
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I am currently reading "Developing Enterprise Java Applications with J2EE and UML" (ISBN 0201738295), which is helpful to me as a UML newbie for 2 reasons. First, it introduces a lot of UML concepts which are opening my eyes to the power of UML. Second, it shows how to use UML to diagram J2EE constructs like Servlets and EJBs which goes beyond simple class diagrams. This is a nice book for UML beginners.
 
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Using UML (Perdita Stevens) is a really good book for learning UML. In addition to the syntax, it walks you through several case studies.
Applying Patterns and UML (Craig Larman) is long winded. While it does explain UML, more energy is spent walking you through the Unified Process.
 
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