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Tom Hennigan

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Recent posts by Tom Hennigan

SDL (Software Development Lifecucle), combined with some OOAD, some UML diagrams, and some RAD (prototypes) seems to be most common in my limited experience. Iterative process has goods points in theory, but many veterans "powers-that-be" that is "managers and directors" cling to old ways.

UML Distilled points out well the combo-approaches commonly used. Newer IT departments (managers, too) try to include more modern design processes. In time, RUP, UP, Agile model will replace RAD, SDL, and combos, I think.
Correction to my post above. Use this click-path to map to external jars from Project -> Properties -> Java Build Path -> Libraries.
Then you have choices: "Add External Jar" or "Add Variable"
14 years ago
Try right-click of your Project, then Properties, then Java Build Path, then choose Libraries. Pick "Add External Jar" then browse to drill-down into eclipse folder of <WSAD-install> to find ibm.mq.jar. Add that jar. It might solve your problem.
14 years ago
Just spent 3 months converting all of my firm's VAJ-developed/maintained applications running on v3.02 WAS to WSAD 5.0 (trial --- no money to buy yet, so hads to reformat and re-install) running on v5 iSeries WAS.
Some pointers. If your old applications used .properties files, you must decide how/where to loacte these. Our applications were simply Web applications, but still need both a WAR file as well as an EAR file. Just to prove concept, we placed .properties files in root of the J2EE Project, but later decided to read them from file system. To do so, use an <init-param>/localeof_propertiesFiles</init-param> in web.xml.
Legacy services like MQ Series and JDBC libraries posed another hurdle. Use WSAD Help to learn about "Using External Jars". A great idea of IBM was to provide WSAD Help on-line at:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wsphelp/index.jsp
Using this site, you preserve resources in your WSAD workspace.
Use right-click on Project -> (and pick) Properties then pick Libraries. There are choices, here. To use absolute path locations, pick "Add External Jar". To specify more of a relative path pick "Add Variable". When moving from WSAD Unit-testing stage to WAS System-test stage, I learned that our AS/400 environment cannot deal with the drive letter specification required by Windows-WSAD. Roughly, on WAS 5 Admin Console, "Shared Libraries" roughly equate to WSAD "Add External Jar" and "WebSphere Managed Variables" roughly equate to WSAD "Add Variable" (sort of like setting a "Windows Environment Variable".
The Help files help a lot. The WebSphere Developer Domain provides plenty of Articles and Redbooks, but I found the Help files most helpful.
So far, I like using WSAD. Next we must install ClearCase LT.
Good luck!
Tom Hennigan
SCJD
14 years ago
If you can afford CodePro Studio, both ramp-up-time-wise as well as cash, then it might offer some automated processes that might prove helpful. IBM does not yet provide extensive documentation and Discussion Groups all too often list only pertinenbt questions --- no answers.
Location of common code and utility classes represented the biggest challenge to my team. We are still trying to find a way to use a legacy version (non-J2EE and WebSphere 5) of MQ without including it inside the EAR file.
Good luck.
14 years ago
Yep, forever registration for SCJD (as long as Sun is still giving it). I purchased the SCJ2D immediately upon passing the SCJ2P four years ago. Since then I have worked for three different companies, taught night classes in Networking and Programming at local technical college, learned J2EE application servers and almost completed a master's degree. Only now I am returning to start my project.
Toughest of times for job-hunting, no doubt. Further certification and/or education can never hurt. I sometimes think that educating in a different field of study might offer advantages ... no easy answers. It often amazes me that some who hold onto programming positions know more about how the company works than about how the technology works.
Determination, stamina, and more dedication seem to be the only prescriptions that work. Then, look for a 4-leaf clover!
16 years ago
I have not had the chance to learn much about webMethods but see it mentioned in job opportunities more often of late. Does anybody know any web-sites that discuss certification in webMethods. One recent job posting required 'webMethods Enterprise Server CERTIFIED'
Thanks
16 years ago
As with most programming tools, the one that you know the best generally works best for you. I have used both JBuilder and Application Developer. If you are developing to WebSphere 4.0, all else equal, I think that Application Developer will make you happiest.
You should find an entry (free) copy of each and try them out. Let your team try them out.
Steve,
As a suggestion, I try to read several different viewpoints on new technology uses, as a conservative measure. Particularly books on Java, are often rushed to completion and sometimes not everything included is well-reviewed or thought-out. I have read many Java books over the past 5 years. Forums like these are a great place to compare notes. And, Kyle Brown is a top-notch bartender as well as Java author.
16 years ago
As in most cases, the best IDE for you is the one that you can use most conveniently.
I agree that early Java learning should start with a basic text editor (even NotePad) and the command line compiler. Mostly for speed.
Sooner or later, though, you will move to a more full-featured development environment. There are many choices --- most of us use the one that our employer provides. In this way, you learn to use several over time.
16 years ago
Check out my response in "Sockets and Internet protocols" for the "good book on network programming" for 3 decent books about network programming with Java.
16 years ago
If you only have time to learn a single language, then you lack the commitment to learn Java. So, I recommend HTML - perhaps using FrontPage or DreamWeaver.
Web programming simply involves a basket of technologies - there is no getting around that. Take a look at the newer technologies grouped under the common veil "Web services" to get an idea, or J2EE for that matter.
Alas, it is fun and worthwhile, but it takes more than a single language.
Good luck!
16 years ago
Forget hard drive - think only of system memory or, RAM.
The compiler for any language must use some runtime data structure for storage of stuff like references to objects in Java or method calls in C++. C++ uses a "stack" for such storage, Java uses a "heap" both of which are dynamically managed at runtime.
The key difference, here, is that different pieces of storage can be allocated from and returned to the heap in no particular order. Whenever something is allocated on the heap, its lifetime is independent of the scope in which it was allocated. Stacks release memory references onces the method or variable completes (returns) or otherwise goes out of scope.
Java uses heap-based storage for variables accessed through references; hence, objects can continue to live even after they go out of scope. Heaps and stacks grow dynamically on demand so most compilers will place them at opposite ends of the memory address space.
This is why you might hear that the heap and the stack grow into the hole between them.
16 years ago
Mahmoud, Q.H. (2000). "Distributed Programming with JAVA".
Elliotte, R.H. (2000). "JAVA Network Programming" 2ed.
Sridharan, S. (2000). "advanced Java networking"
I like these, in the above order, assuming that you are new to network programming. There is a tutorial at Java.Sun.Com that introduces network programming adequately.