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Stian Almaas

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since Sep 22, 2005
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Recent posts by Stian Almaas

Thank you so much!
This is a book I'm dying to read. I am so ready to be a badass!
5 years ago
Wow, thanks for that response, Kathy. It was a lot more than I expected.

Kathy Sierra wrote:
I have always said that if we took out everything that makes a Head First book a Head First book, the two things that absolutely are necessary are the heavy use of visuals (especially the diagrams) and the annotated code. The annotated code is a dramatically powerful way to help reduce the cognitive load experienced when trying to learn how things work in code. Part of that annotated code (not Java-code-annotations -- I mean the way we make 'notes' on the code) is also that we are able to keep repeating parts of the context in which the code we're discussing lives. A code snippet without repeating its context is a very difficult way to learn because very few people can see the original context just once and then remember it perfectly on the next page.



That certainly feels right. Another of my favorite technical books is Steve Krugs "Don't make me think!". His book also has very effective use of visuals.
I also agree on the annotated code. The notes made me re-read the parts of the code that were annotated. When I think about it, having code in a paper book feels a little off. It is a little like having dried flowers in a herbarium. Code is much easier to grasp when it is alive in the computer and you can play around with it. The annotated code and the "Be the compiler" excercises was better in that they made me think through the code more. I find in other java books it is easier to just skim the code sections.

Kathy Sierra wrote:
I'll answer it this way by revealing something NOBODY knows (until now ;) -- my current project is working on a form of interactive learning for Java 8.



OMG! That is a scoop for the JavaRanch! We heard it here first. Really exciting news!


Thank you again,
Stian
5 years ago
Hello Kathy!

I have enjoyed several of the Head First series and I like the way the books presents the material. I wonder, how has your delivery changed since you did HF Java all those years ago? What have you learnt that makes this book more engaging than HF Java?

I see on forum comments and such that even though I like the HF style there are many that find it distracting. Have you explicitly decided to write to a special kind of reader? Do you think that there are different modes of learning that fits to different people or is there a "best" way?

Another one; personally I find that I learn best through doing and one of the good things about the HF books is that they break up the material with frequent excercises. Do you think that the content of this book could be even better delivered through some kind of interactive experience? I'm in two minds myself. Sites like Khan Academy and Codecademy etc. are already very good and has very good potential. On the other hand, books are standalone packages and probably live longer.

Thanks for your time (and your books)
Stian
5 years ago
Hello Fernando and thanks for taking the time to answer our questions!

I would like you to describe how your workflow is for making Web apps. I'm kinda new to javascript development and I haven't quite landed my workflow for that. As a Java developer I'm used to compiling code a lot. I find that TDD can help shorten the feedback loop and things like hot deploy on Jetty helps but there is still a lot of compilation and restarts going on. In Javascript this is easier since you only have to reload the page to restart the application.
Do you have other tips for making an effective development environment?

Thanks,
Stian
Excellent!
8 years ago

Do you know if there will be any video in addition to the slide decks? I'm trying to watch as many videos of Mr. Hickey as possible hoping that some smartness will transfer by osmosis.
8 years ago
Good news, Sean!

I have actually already purchased the MEAP version and I was wondering when the paper version would turn up. It has taken quite some time now.

8 years ago

Wow, really?!

Too bad you didn't make it. I would say it is pretty cool to get your stuff published by the pragpub guys, even if it is just a smaller article. I hope you will get the opportunity again later.
9 years ago
Hello everyone!

Pragmatic publishing has a monthly magazine that I read regularly and this month they have a special issue on Clojure. It is out now (http://pragprog.com/magazines) !
Haven't had time to read much yet but there's an intro article and what seems to be a bit deeper articles.

Worth a look...
9 years ago
Manning has started converting books to more e-reader and mobile friendly formats. And one of the books that have been converted to epub and mobi is Joy of Clojure. So now it is possible to enjoy this book on Kindles and smartphones. Excellent!

I just hope they follow up with Clojure in Action as well.
9 years ago

Wow, using Hibernate with Clojure! I guess you can get into some very interesting debugging scenarios mixing those two up...

This doesn't sound like a beginners book. Am I right? Still, this is exciting. Christophe Grand is a personal hero of mine. I bet he has sneaked in some moustache and enlive in that book.
9 years ago

Matthew Lucas wrote:Check out

http://4clojure.com

It's an addictive site with a ton of Clojure challenges.



Thanks Matthew. I believe I have heard of it before but you made me go over and have a look. Great fun!
9 years ago
Sorry, I clicked the wrong link.

This link: https://coderanch.com/forums/how-to/java/BeClojurian is wrong and I tried going to the clojure FAQ via that. My mistake, sorry!
9 years ago
It is gone again...
9 years ago
Thanks John!

That was actually more than I asked for, which is wonderful!

The link to the assembla-wiki was perfect. Exactly what I was looking for. Copying what the api developers are doing is probably best. And I can see that they do have a preferance for short names, like x,y for numbers, pred for predicates etc.

I also prefer longer names for functions and vars. I am used to camel case so I don't read that any differently than the dashes used in Clojure. For me it would have been just as easy to go with camel case but I guess it is nice to explicitly see where you call down to Java code.
9 years ago