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Mark Donaghue

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since Apr 01, 2001
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Recent posts by Mark Donaghue

Great job, Skip. The most important thing is what you learn, not the score.
Regards,
Mark
Great job, Amanda! Fantastic score
I found your comment about the sequence diagrams being too detailed quite interesting. Could you comment on what your thought process was in deciding what to include?
Also, what level of detail did you include on your class diagram(s)?
Thanks and congrats,
Mark
Scott,
This is a very useful conversation, because it's helping me clear up some fuzzy concepts I've had about security.
Heres what I think is happening: the keystore contains certificates, each of which which contains the public key of a trusted source, and which is named by an alias. These are certificates imported into keystore to run someone else's code.
Keytool can also be used to create your own public/private key pairs. Presumably, the private key would used to sign your own jar files, the public key what you would export to others who use your code.
When a java class executes, the security manager checks in the policy file to see if that codebase has permission to do what it wants to do. Also, if the grant entry has a "signed by" entry, then the security manager uses the "signed by" entry to look up the public certificate in the keystore (matching on alias). If it's there, then it's from a trusted source. The keystore to check is named in the keystore entry of the relevant policy file.
Regards,
Mark

[This message has been edited by Mark Donaghue (edited May 17, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Mark Donaghue (edited May 17, 2001).]
Scott,
If it's in the keystore, doesn't that mean the certificate is trusted? I think that a class must still be granted specific permission do an operation that would normally be restricted. If it's local code, then all bets are off anyway (unless a security manager was specified when the app was started).
Regards,
Mark

Hi Scott,
If there is a class X in a signed jarfile, but there is no code entry for it in the policy file currently in effect, then what permissions does it have? The "keystore" entry doesn't specify permissions.
Regards,
Mark
Hi Scott,
Regarding thislast statement,
"The keystore contains public keys which have security policies."
I did not know about this. I thought that only classes are granted permissions in the policy file. However, my understanding on security is incomplete, so I could easily be wrong.
Regards,
Mark
No, you don't need to study those for the first part. Take a look at them at some point, though, they are very important for EJB design.
Regards,
Mark
Hi Dan - congratulations! Way to go. Great score, too. Send me you spare Tums - I hope to submit soon myself
(p.s. how many certifications does that make now? 47 and counting?)
Best regards,
Mark

[This message has been edited by Mark Donaghue (edited May 07, 2001).]
Hi,
When I try to run Sun's deploy tool, I'm getting this Swing-related problem:
java.lang.NullPointerException
at javax.swing.text.LabelView.syncFragments(LabelView.java:110)
at javax.swing.text.LabelView.getPreferredSpan(LabelView.java:290)
Any idea why?
Thanks very much.
19 years ago
An interesting subtlety here is you could suggest that since the you're using IIOP as the underlying transport protocol, why shouldn't the client be able to talk the C code on the server? After all, isn't the point of moving from RMI-JRMP to RMI-IIOP to allow a pure java solution to talking with non-java code? Unfortunately, RMI-IIOP supports only a subset of IIOP and so doesn't necessarily provide whatever piece of IIOP that particular client needs to run as a distrubted service. A good link explaining this is at: http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-1999/jw-12-iiop_p.html
Regards,
Mark


[This message has been edited by Mark Donaghue (edited April 27, 2001).]
I agree keeping them together is a good idea for the time being. You like to see a little activity, and if it were strictly part 2, there wouldn't be much going on.
Mark
I agree the answer is B, and it will read the committed data, because that's what "read_committed" says to do.
Mark
Hi Skip,
I'm not really sure. I tried running the mdl files separately, but they didn't work. I suspect it has to run with the intalled application, but I'm not entirely sure about that.
Mark
In line with that, the latest reference implementation of the Java Pet Store almost completely removes java code from JSP, relying on tags. The bluprints recommend using JSP for the view portion, and Servlets for the controller portion.
Regards,
Mark
19 years ago
Hi Skip,
I'm using Rational Rose 98. I got a trial copy of it (30 days) on the back of Mark Grand's Java design Pattern's book. I learned it using the excellent movie-based tutorial that comes with it (although that part has to be downloaded). It makes generation of sequence diagrams trivial. Also, it runs on my limited 64 meg machine, which the newer versions don't. You may have to export it to gif or jpg format (whichever one is smaller) to upload it.
On the sequence diagrams'low priority in the scoring, my guess is that Sun just wants a very general overall feel for the program flow, just the very major messages. A programmer will probably have a lot of latitude for manipulating all the exact messages.
It looks liek ithey just want to make sure that you follow along
with the MVC architecture, and properly divide components between
the various tiers.
Regrards,
Mark