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Matthew Webster

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Recent posts by Matthew Webster

Thanx
I had got quite some way into working through all that - things took me away from it. I do, however, understand most of it now, having gone through the logs in detail and playing around with jaws.xml settings.
I'm using JBoss 2.4.4. I don't really have the time to get to grips with the latest version (due to getting to grips with lots of other things) unless anyone thinks it is really worth it- I've not heard good things so far.

Cheers,
Matt.
18 years ago
Hello again guys,
Some time ago I vaguely recall someone posting a question on how to get an Apache or Tomcat session to allow the user to specifically log out after having logged in, rather than simply having their session timeout or closing the browser window.
I've been looking around and probably just not recognised the article, but nevertheless cannot find it.
Question in full: How do you tell Apache and Tomcat (separately) that you want their session to logout? (Is this one of those "can't" or "it's easy, but no-one reaslises it" things?)

Cheers,
Matt.
18 years ago
You are correct, you need to make sure that the environment variable CLASSPATH contains all the pathnames of the Jar's which you are importing classes from. If not, you could put them on the compile-time classpath using:
javac -classpath c:\java\MyJar.jar MyClass.java
Be warned: This will overwrite the known classpath that javac will get from the system.
You might consider using Jakarta's Ant to build your project.
You may also want to reduce all your catch blocks down to one:
catch (Exception e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
}
This will catch every exception you expect to get and output the result of the error to the standard error stream (visible in the normal command line output stream). You can always check for specific exception by adding other catch clauses before the block above. (There are many views on how to catch errors, but if you are currently learning, rather than developing a large application, you might want to make it easier on yourself, for the time being).
Good luck.
Ps: This should probably be in the Java In General forum.
18 years ago
JSP
sorry about this...
...but I cannot seem to find a DTD which defines the tag-file element for the taglib as documented in:
http://java.sun.com/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial/doc/JSPTags6.html#71802
I have looked around (including the DTD listings) and found no support for it, althoug the downloadable Jakarta taglib Jar's do use the format described in the above document.
Does anyone know why this is not covered in any DTD, any useful info would be good...?

Regards,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
Hi guys,
I facing an issue and was wondering if anyone had done the same:
I am writing a collection of TagLibs for various things. Most tags will have attributes with names like 'name', 'value', 'default' etc. Has anyone got a decent way of providing a set of default values for all of these tags and their attributes which can be provided by some method or other from within, say, the initial servlet call?
My problem is more one of having too many options, than not enough.

Thanx,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
In C++ are you writing to a file on disc AND writing to the standard out, or just one of those?
If you are not writing to the standard out you will not receive anything on the Java's standard in.
You may need to flush the output of your C++ output.
If you are writing to a file in C++, then reading the file in Java, is the Java waiting until the file is finished being written before it starts reading? If not it will be trying to read a file which has no content yet.
18 years ago
JSP
Going perhaps a little of the original point, but would you know the best way to provide a JSP name to a custom tag (via attribute or whatever) and then have the handler of the tag include (or even forward) to the named JSP.
Would this even be a good idea or is it better to simply stick with <jsp:include...> ?

Regards,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
Hello peeps, I was just wondering what the (no doubt many and varied) ways people are passing data/objects/thing-ummies-of-use to their custom tags are?
There are the obvious ones, of course, but does anyone use variations, slight modifications or just break the rules completely?
Feel free to note down your ideas here

Best regards,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
Thanx for the help.
I asked because in the past I have used pieces of Java to simply include other JSP's, sometimes in large and complex numbers. This function appeared to disappear when I tried a direct .include() in a JSP under the recent version of Tomcat.
The evidence of this was that the output of the JSP being included appeared before any of the output from the JSP calling the include method.
I am now happy as to an up-to-date methodology, but does anyone have an answer as to why the above happened?

Best regards,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
Maybe try
<jsp:include page="" />
18 years ago
JSP
I have a...
<finder>
<name>findByStartsWithAndLocale</name>
<query>entry LIKE "{0}%" AND locale = {1}</query>
<order></order>
</finder>
block in my JAWS.xml. It works fine. Maybe it was the surrounding characters of your arg.
Good luck.
18 years ago
> Now I want the client in a jar file. What classes do I need to run it on anywhere with a jre 1.4.1? Can somebody help please?
Any Jar's you included in the CLASSPATH when you got it to compile.

Walk first...
Good luck,
M.
18 years ago
Ah, yes, I have just caught on - sorry.
Quite nifty. Unfortunately, I'm not entirely sure it does what I'm looking for exactly. But then, I'm picky.
Thanks,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
Hello peeps,
Could anyone tell me if it is possible to call the include() method (of RequestDispatcher) from inside a JSP, please?
I have found it useful in the past, but cannot seem to get it to work properly at the moment. Only include() from a servlet appears to work, rather than throw an (unhelpful) exception.
My main aim is to have a piece of Java being executed within a JSP which decides at that time which JSP should be included.
I understand this (or something similar) is possible with the jsp:forward tag, but with jsp:include?
Thanks for any help,
Matt.
18 years ago
JSP
When a WAR file is copied into the WebApps directory Tomcat unzips it (war's, jar's, ear's etc are just zip files in disguise) into the webapps directory.
There is one exception, something to do with the server.xml file which you just would not expect Tomcat to not realise there is anything to deploy, but I can't remember what it is right now.
18 years ago
JSP