Bjarki Holm

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Recent posts by Bjarki Holm

Anil,
<code>BatchUpdateException</code> extends <code>SQLException</code>. How did you find out that it was throwing <code>SQLException</code>? I mean, does it say so in the stack trace, or anywhere else?

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Bjarki Holm
Suzanne,
well, they do not assume any EJB knowledge, if that's what you mean. However, they do build up on the reader's knowledge, and get to some pretty advanced issues, but the reader doesn't need any particular EJB knowledge priorhand.

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Bjarki Holm
Congratulations, guys! I hope that you like the book.
It's been a pleasure for me also, this is a great site, and I will most likely hang around the ranch in the future!
Cheers everyone,

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Anil,
as this information is dynamically changing (as new drivers become available), I suggest that you consult the Drivers database at SUN: http://industry.java.sun.com/products/jdbc/drivers.
Regards,
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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Anil,
that seems to have been taken care of...

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Vipul,
well, as an example, we have one case study of a visitor tracking system for websites, using servlets and PL/SQL to store and retrieve data from an Oracle instance. Another case study deals with a web portal, that reads XML data from remote data sources (content providers). The portal system provides general interfaces for data access, that are implemented to suit each content provider's different needs for transport (XML-RPC, HTTP, etc.).
These are just two examples. To get more information, you can look at the table of contents for the book... or just buy the thing and see for yourself
Regards,
Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
[This message has been edited by Bjarki Holm (edited June 15, 2001).]
Well, it really depends on what drivers you are using, and what DBMS is targeted. There is really no simple answer to this. In one place, a type 2 driver might be the best choice, whereas you could have a type 3 driver somewhere else.
Hmmm... how my name is pronounced? Try "Bjaarghi"... this is Icelandic, which is probably hard for everyone to pronounce (except for, maybe, Germans)
Regards,
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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Vaibhav,
yes, Pro Java Data does discuss all types of JDBC drivers, including type 3 and type 4. But I don't think these are any more "advanced" than type 2 drivers, they're just implemented differently.
Regards,

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Shivani,
I'm not sure if I understand you correctly, but one possible approach is to load a stored JavaMail program in the Oracle database, and have a trigger call a PL/SQL wrapper procedure that invokes the JavaMail, and effectively sends an e-mail message.
P.S. I covered this topic in detail in a book called Professional Oracle 8i Application Programming (ISBN: 1861004842), published by Wrox Press.

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
I replied this question in another post called How is your book different...
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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Hi Vipul!
Well, before I started writing for Wrox, I had already bought a few of their books for my personal usage, both in relations to my work as well as other private studies. What I found best with the Wrox titles, is the fact that they contain vast amounts of information, which is actually interesting (and even fun!) to read, due to the fact that they are written by a group of people (still) working in the field - programmers like you and me.
Having many authors on a single title can both be a strength and a weakness. The strength of this is that the book becomes diverse, and each author gets a chance to cover his or hers most experienced topic. Of course, this diversity can be a weakness too, if the chapters are not integrated enough with the overall theme of the title.
With Professional Java Data, I must say that the editors have done an excellent job integrating the work of some 14 authors in a solid title on data access with the Java language. The book is rich with examples, and real-life case studies, that take the concepts introduced in previous chapters and illustrate how they fit together in today's programming environment.
You are absolutely right, when you say that this book covers basically the same material as so many others on the same subject. But then again, this isn't something new. How many books are there on Italian cooking, for example? They certainly all contain one or two lasagne recipes, don't they?
The key difference between Professional Java Data, and other similar books on the market, is its emphasis on real-life scenerios, case studies and examples. Wherever possible, the authors share their personal experience with the reader - warning about potential bottlenecks, bug holes, and such - all within the context of a solid reader on data access with Java!
Let me know if you have more questions.
Regards,
Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
[This message has been edited by Bjarki Holm (edited June 13, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Bjarki Holm (edited June 13, 2001).]
Andrew,
in fact, it does.
Chapter 4, Data Modeling, covers database design and data modeling; chapter 5, Database Concepts and Techniques, covers the fundamentals of relatonal databases; and, finally, chapter 10, Java and the ODMG 3.0 Specification, talks about object databases.

Regards,

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Carklin,
first of all, registering a driver with Class.forName() is a JDBC 1.0 practise, which is now mostly obsolete, with the introdcution of DataSource in JDBC 2.0. I've never registered a driver with System.setProperty(), so I'm not sure how it differs from Class.forName(), if it does so in the first place.
Carklin, if you need more information on using the new features of JDBC 2.0, and especially the JDBC 2.0 optional packages, you can start your search in the JDBC Learning Center at Sun, at http://java.sun.com/products/jdbc/learning.html. There is also a lot of information on this topic in this week's book giveaway (I'm playing a salesman this week, so forgive me if you're shocked ), Professional Java Data.
On the other subject, I don't see the (dis)advantages of using multiple Statement objects - not if they're all closed after usage in the first place - except for the obvious added garbage collection and memory usage.
Regards,

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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
Hi Sachin,
there is a lot of devotion on connection pooling in the book. I am a little familiar with the DBConnectionBroker packages (although I have never used them in an enterprise scenario), although they are not mentioned in the Java Data book. The book puts emphasis on connection pooling with the JDBC 2.0 optional packages (ConnectionPoolDataSource, connection caching with Oracle, etc.), which means that it should benefit everyone using a JDBC standard pooling mechanism.
If you're having problems with the DBConnectionBroker, you should maybe try go get a JDBC 2.0 compliant JDBC driver, which provides an implementation of the ConnectionPoolDataSource interface. Once such driver for My SQL, JDataConnect, is available from http://www.j-netdirect.com, at least with a 30-day trial. As I'm not much of a My SQL enthusiast, there might well be other, better drivers available (some of the other cowboys around might give you tips on this).
Let me know if you need more information on this.
Regards,
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Bjarki Holm
Author of Professional Java Data
[This message has been edited by Bjarki Holm (edited June 13, 2001).]