Ron Moddesette

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since Jun 19, 2000
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Recent posts by Ron Moddesette

Great story. I hope the father makes a full recovery.
15 years ago
My training in business/economics agrees with you Mark. However as a software engineer, the short term affects of the current job market are quite scary to me. I see fewer jobs and less pay in the American market.

However, I have to admit in the long run we may all be better off, albeit in different capacities/careers. I think most people with some motivation will be able to adapt. Change can be scary to some people, and the pace of globalization is scary to me when I consider my family and the possibility of having to switch careers at this point in my life. Then again, as the economy picks up, my fears hopefully will prove to be unfounded. ( sorry for bad grammar, it's late )
[ July 24, 2004: Message edited by: Ron Moddesette ]
16 years ago
I didn't read the article, only the quote. However I wouldn't call IT the first wave since this has been happening to manufacturing jobs for decades. However as applied to "white-collar" jobs, I think this may be the first wave.

Service jobs have also been outsource, just look at all the call centers in India. I don't think all of American jobs will be located, however I don believe corporations will continue to take advantage of labor arbitrage which will result in lower wages and fewer jobs.

I'm no expert, but it makes sense.
16 years ago
Tim, the previous replies are all valid.
You're definitely not too old, considering you have at least another 20 years of work (unless you become wealthy).
I would consider going to a company that needs your mainframe skills but also use Java. You could get your foot in the door as a Cobol guy and perhaps after a year or so (once you've proven yourself) the company maybe willing to train you in Java. The advantage of this approach is you won't initially have to compete with other out of work Java developers - many of whom already have direct Java experience.
I did something similiar myself. I started in configuration management and moved over to development after a year. I now have been developing the past 3 years.
I would also consider broadening your scope. You may want to invest some time learning the .NET platform - learn C#. If you can get in early on the Microsoft.NET bandwagon, you may have more opportunities.
Just my 2 cents.
Ron.
17 years ago
I can understand your frustration with the job situation. I would suggest working on your communication and people skills. If you can't convey your technical knowledge to the people who are hiring, they'll never know what they're missing.
Your comments on the Polish guy are irrelevant to finding a job. The office politics you are describing are present in every industry as politics are just part of the human condition.
Good luck.
17 years ago
I agree with this post. I've been playing around with Java the past year (I even took a couple of classes) with the goal of getting my SCJP but now I'm not going to bother.
The Java market is flooded, and I'd have to take a pay cut. I'm currently a Smalltalk programmer, and I'll bet the Microsoft bandwagon is going to take off. I plan on getting on their bandwagon since I've already missed the Java bankwagon.
Just my 2 cents.
18 years ago
If you're desperate for a job, testing may pay the bills. I'd ask about the chances of moving into development from testing.
At my work a few testers have moved to development, but most move on to something else. Testing is a very tedious job and you may want to think long and hard about settling for this position. If possible I'd wait for a development position, because you may get stuck in testing for along time(year+).
I hope this info helped you,
Ron
18 years ago
Sorry everyone, I just read a previous post here that answered my question.
Thanks, anyway.
I saw a post yesterday - can't remember where, but it implied IBM was going to start pushing another Java IDE and let VAJ stagnate.
Has anyone else heard of this? Thanks,
Ron.
Hi, Tony is definitely correct about Java in e-commerce, but I wouldn't write off Telecom.
I know several people that work at a major telecom co - headquartered in Kansas City area that is making the Shift to Java. Currently they are using Smalltalk ( OO dev language)on a huge project - hundreds of developers, but are looking/currently shifting to Java as the main dev platform. I'm guessing that other Telcos are either doing Java now, or are gearing up to do Java.
19 years ago
Congratulations.
You mentioned books used, but what is JLS?
Thanks.
I can appreciate your frustration with your original salary and your perception someone might think a Masters isn't worth it, but I believe you may want to consider some other factors.
My experience (I'm currently a Smalltalk programmer)is that employers don't hand out raises like candy. You have to ask for a raise. In your case, you were hired in at too low of a level IMHO, but after you had proven yourself, were given a substantial raise. Obviously your boss thought you were worth more, but I'm guessing primarily due to your educational background. You have to be aggressive with your career, which means you ask for something if you think you deserve it. I'm glad to see you recognized your worth and got what you deserved.
Regarding the worth of a degree in the IT market, that all depends. I know several collegues who are making 100k + as contractors with no Masters. This is because of experience, not education.
A Masters will give you a good foundation, and perhaps give you more options, but the most valuable programmers, architects, etc. get that way from experience.
I'll get off my soap box now, and just want to say It's not as bad as you may think.
Ron.
[This message has been edited by Ron Moddesette (edited August 03, 2000).]
20 years ago
Lori, I'm from K.C also, but currently programming in Smalltalk, but am learning Java to make transition later this year. I spoke with a Headhunter and he gave a good tip. If you are new programmer, do not go through headhunter/contracting firms because Employers do not want to pay premium (headhunter fees)for junior employees they will have to train. You should go directly to the employer and eliminate any middle parties.
Bottom line is as Junior developer, you want to keep your hiring cost as low as possible.
If you have already been going directly to perspective employers, all I can say is keep trying.
Good luck,
Ron.
20 years ago
Al, I am a former CA resident - Bay Area and Sacramento. I haven't lived there in five years - I moved right before the Dot Com explosion. I do know in San Jose (Silicon Valley) the average home price is over $400k. That basically is a starter home. I have also read that family income of $50k still qualifies for gov't assistance.
It would appear that 115K in Silicon Valley isn't close to 70K in OH. My friends that live in the Bay Area cannot afford homes and they make good money.
Several people opt to commute - live in a more out-lying area - but then you have to fight the unbelievable traffic.
I would do some serious research before moving there.
Just my 2 cents.
20 years ago
Thanks for the info Paul.
I guess it's time to learn Java,
Ron.
20 years ago