gary fong

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since Jun 27, 2007
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Recent posts by gary fong

I understand immutability. I was just curious how spring's autowired constructor injection makes the class more immutable. Again, I've only used field injection and I don't necessarily have to have setters for spring to inject what it wants to into the class. Again, I've heard constructor injection has many benefits so I thought I'd ask the book authors. I'll give it a try myself. It's probably as awesome as everyone has been saying.
7 years ago
Tim, yes, JEE. That's what I get for posting at 3am. I agree about your statement about the benefits of immutable classes. Can you briefly explain how constructor injection makes it possible to write immutable classes?

- Gary
7 years ago
Hello @sharma and @sari, I am starting a greenfield j2ee app and I want to know if I should exclusively use constructor injection. The last app I wrote used field injection. It was very easy. I've read articles, however, touting the visibility of the dependencies when using constructor injection. I didn't have problem with dependencies in my application because it was pretty small as j2ee apps go. I was able to get my head around the system.. This next app, though, will be quite large.

What's your opinion on the matter? Does constructor injection really make the system more comprehensible? Does it offer a technical benefit such as establishing mocks for testing?

The best thing about spring and spring boot is it's simplicity. It doesn't burden us with cognitive noise. I just want to make sure if I adopt constructor injection that I don't loose these kind of benefits.

Thanks
Gary
7 years ago

I've begun writing an app that I want to run both on my 10" tablet and 3.7" phone. Part of the screen will be 2D graphics and the other part a number of buttons. How does one go about reasoning which layout views to use and the proportionality of the various elements/views in the app? Do I just do the simple, possibly naive, big-to-little decomposition? How do I consider portrait/landscape in this mix as well?

Thanks
13 years ago
This is great! GWT experts.

I currently work for a company that has a very complex web app, 40+ screens. This web version has been in the works for about 6+ years, maybe longer. It has a heavy dependence on IE and all of its idiosyncrasies. Way before the AJAX buzz, this app used remote scripting via hidden iframes, and still does. It leverages DHTML, IE behaviors, ActiveX controls, and more. And then there's the javascript. Tons of it. Most of it business logic. This is all mixed together with a homegrown java library which generates JS/HTML components tied to our model.

In the past 2 years, there's a realization that we have a big unmaintainable, rigid, fragile mess. Some attempt has been made to look at overhauling the front-end. So far it has been limited to incoporating JS libraries like YUI, prototype, and scriptaculous and trying to swap in Swing MVC as the front-end controller. But all of us are sort of still trying to grapple how the new frameworks will help us out now and in the future.

I've only read bits of GWT in Action and only a bit more about GWT in general. Our skill base is primarily Java (and Smalltalk), though we know JS very well. This alone is why I graviate towards GWT being a good fit for our company. However, it is so different from the standard paradigm, where the client is coded in JS, that it seems a big risk to pursue this path.

My question is can GWT be used as the cornerstone technology for a large-scale web application such as ours? What are some of the downsides? Also, how can GWT be introduced slowly, over a period of releases?
17 years ago
GWT