Tatyana Chinya

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since Aug 16, 2007
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Recent posts by Tatyana Chinya

Who are primary users of Docker - developers or DevOps?  Should developers read this book?
4 years ago
Eric,

I've read that article before, and it looks like most of the content is copied from the msdn.microsoft article. I don't think I've checked the links on the bottom before. Two of them don't work, but the other two have some code, so I will look at that.

One more questions: Did you ever use sIEve? I downloaded the exe and started playing with it, but I can't figure out how to know which line of code has an issue. When I click on "Show leaks", the first column shows the number, so I thought it may be the line number in code. But when I go to that line, there is no tag that the Tag column is referring to.
Eric,

I did see the memory leak first using Task Manager and I also tried Drip, but Drip was crashing on pop-up windows, but it also reported memory leak.

The article that you linked is the same one that I referred to in my post. As I understand, it suggests to use expandoProperty, which I don't know much about and not sure if it works for FF and Mozilla.

Is using expandoProperty the only way to solve the problem?
In my web application, I have a lot of javaScript functions which, as I leaned recently, leak memory because I�m creating closures, but I don�t understand how I can create DHTML without them. For example:


According to the articles I�ve read on the internet (one of them: Memory Leak in IE, IE does not free up the memory for those objects because DOM objects is referencing javaScript object � � and function has the reference to the DOM object, so there is a circular reference.

In all the articles that I�ve read I can�t quite understand/find the solution to this problem. I think I saw a suggestion of declaring the function in the global scope and then assigning it to the element.onclick property, but doesn�t it still create a circular reference?

Can any one point me to the working solution?
Thanks guys. Both of the solutions work. Paul, do you have any idea how the browsers interpret

I know that it works, but it would be nice to know why.
I'm trying to hide/show the rows of the table when user clicks on the image in a particular row. Here is the code:

var rows= tbl.getElementsByTagName("tr");
for(i = 0; i < rows.length; i++) {
if (rows[i].id.indexOf(rootId + "-") > -1) {

if (rows[i].style.display == "none") {
rows[i].style.display= "block"; // works in IE but not in FF
//rows[i].style.display= "table-row"; //works in FF but not in IE
} else {
rows[i].style.display= "none";
}

}
}

What I found is that the "display=block" value works in IE but not in FF or M; "display=table-row" works in FF and M, but not in IE.

So I was wondering if there is a way to detect if a particular style property value is allowed in the browser, like object detection (for example: if (window.focus) {}). I don't want to use browser detection. Is there any other way of doing it?