Win a copy of Hello World this week in the Python forum!

Jon Ferguson

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since Sep 05, 2007
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Recent posts by Jon Ferguson

There seems two key areas to address when looking at Hadoop.. First, the nuts and bolts of just getting it up and running on various hardware. Sounds like EMR might address a real need here since much of this is being done in the cloud anyway. Second, the 'why' of doing this in the first place. To this end I'm looking forward to perusing this book further. There's lot's of ways to attack a problem and Hadoop provides the framework to do this heavy lifting. However we still need to understand how to write the algorithms to get the knowledge we are looking for. In this regard - you've listed using Mahout for document classification with naive-bayes in your chapter on Text processing. Can you describe roughly how you approach this problem with Hadoop and Mahout?
6 years ago
Multi-threading appears simpler and more scalable. Reduction of code bloat with fewer reasons for template code. Adding functional programming to your arsenal for problem solving.
7 years ago
Hey Chris,

Thanks for the link from the Guardian.. it was quite enlightening. 2 things struck me: 1) the ability to keep all your production deployments the same as with Java, and 2) the massive code reduction. Since every line of code introduces potential bugs this is very cool. Their REST API for accessing data across the enterprise is also just the kind of application I'm looking at. Interesting how they started with test then felt they had to build the whole think in Scala.
7 years ago
Hey Nilanjan,

Scala looks interesting with respect to scaling out services. Multi-threading does indeed introduce a load of hard to find problems. Working with software like RabbitMQ which is Erlang based seems to bring benefits but at the risk of lack of internal and community expertise. I've heard similar queries regarding scala. That's a big issue when companies are planning to invest a lot on building scalable web-services - and don't want to create code that will be hard to find maintainers for in the future. So there are two questions here really: 1) what sort of scalability improvements might we expect over Java services? and 2) what's your read on the future popularity of the language for multithreaded systems?
7 years ago
I wondered that too. In the end I mapped it to the jsps and elements of the JSF framework (my choice). I included these in my sequence diagrams. Unfortunately, I'm still waiting for my results.

I did feel that by the time I finished I had done things in much more detail than I would normally. There is a statement somewhere to guard you against overkill.. but I find I keep thinking of ideas they might want shown!!

All the best,
Jon
Hi there,

I think the details about the 3rd exam say its essay. I would suggest you know you're design from part 2 and Why you made those design decisions.

Cheers,
Jon
Hey guys. Thanks for all the congrats. I've been away from my desk and just managed to get back on after a busy 2 weeks. The positive vibes in this place rocks!

Cheers,
Jon
11 years ago
Hey guys,

Harder than I expected but managed a 75% score.

I've been working with J2EE for 9 years and have worked experienced the changes. Finally bit the bullet with v5 since there are significant benefits compared to EJB 2. Mostly driven by popular demand and the likes of Spring.

I spent quite a lot of time re-reading and studying things like:
*Go4 (no surprise there)
*J2EE patterns (I already had the original version but bought version 2 as it has web-service related stuff - well worth it.. I think they even have updated the best practices, etc. - found myself enjoying a second read).
*Mastering EJB3.0 (another good read)
*I also used Whizlabs SCEA5 to get in the testing groove... it's ok but has some serious faults.. partly still stuck in pre-v5 stuff, partly poor english, partly programming errors that caused it to crash.. however.. the 3 full length tests were helpful.. and I have to say that although the quick review sheet was obviously written pre-v5, it has some good input.
*a review of the latest J2EE tutorial
*general Sun website reading on aspect of JAX-WS etc.

The best thing about all this was tripping over some new stuff I didn't know much of it just cool tech... And of course working the logic of enterprise design issues.. really enjoyed looking again at J2EE patterns.. and GO4.

So I guess this will actually improve my designs! Surprise!

All the best,
Jon
11 years ago
Awesome! Thanks! And thanks to the Authors for their great input.

Congrats to the other winners.

Jon
11 years ago
Hi again. I did take the advanced course. I see where you're coming from but don't entirely agree. The did have some practicals though not as many as say some of the Learning Tree courses I've taught or QA ones I've taken. The quality proposition came from talking the the guys who were actively building the stuff they were teaching.

I would agree that the docs are often the weak side, (always thought that was a culture thing). But I have to say I've noticed a big difference since Red Hat took over. As a case in point, I find the Seam docs really good.

Cheers,
Jon
11 years ago
Just saw that Spring and Pitchfork allows you to use Spring to do dependency injection of resources and interceptors on EJB3 beans. That seems powerful in that you could then presumably test all this stuff outside of the server. That seems to be what Seam is providing in the way of testability, is that right?

Cheers,
Jon
11 years ago
I would second that.. playing with Seam, conversational state management seems to be the fundamental 'out-of-the-box' thinking that excites. On the surface of it, it seems to be contrary to some J2EE pattern thinking. But I'm inclined to think it's right. Also Seam leverages JSF and IMHO takes it to a new level. Though I'd like to see more on how scalability really stacks up.

Jon
11 years ago
Thanks guys. I have looked at the documentation.. and a bit at the source code .. but need to spend the time to push this forward. They did mention this in the Advanced JBoss class and notes.. which might also be the best way forward.
11 years ago
One of the things I like about the JBoss configuration approach is the use of JMX Beans to build a server to match your needs. Having said that I haven't delved too deeply into that realm. Part of the reason is that I find getting to this level fraught with frustration. Does your book bring out solid examples in this area? Also with lightweight containers such as Spring about.. how would the microkernel compare? Finally.. just how lightweight can this be (of course you have hardly any services at that level)? Do you have any extreme examples of deployments say on limited or embedded hardware?

Cheers,
Jon
11 years ago
I think I agree with Ronald that the route to the goal is probably the most important part. However, it is nice to show you've done the work.

James' comments on the difference between old and new exams is interesting.. I'm wondering why the new approach? Thinking about it though, how do you measure architectural ability in a multiple choice type exam? Does anyone have a handle on Part II? That's supposed to be project based exam - has it changed significantly?