B Davis

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Recent posts by B Davis

Are they teaching Groovy in colleges and universities, or will a company have to rely on finding a Java programmer who has migrated himself/herself to Groovy on their own? If an organization begins including Groovy code in their software they'll want to be sure they can hire someone with the knowledge to maintain it.

Barbee
12 years ago

Originally posted by Sherif Mahmoud:
Hi,

I always hear the buzz word "Agile Programming". I have the white book of Kent Beck "Extreme Programming". What is the difference between Agile Programming and Extreme Programming? Am I mistaken to think that they are the same thing but Agile Programming is just another name instead of Extreme Programming?

Thanks,

Sherif



In English, the word agile means very flexible or able to adjust to change easily. For example, an agile athlete could easily switch paths to avoid another player while running down the field.

Agile programming is a concept in which software developers stay very flexible in what and how much they will actually code in each "iteration", usually just a week or two. This is in contrast to a more traditional approach in which the entire project is carefully laid out before any code is written.

The idea is that this allows the customer more opportunity to change and adjust to changing business needs, or at least get the most important parts of the software developed before time and money run out.

There are many specific methodologies used to be "Agile" or flexible in software development. Some are Extreme programming, SCRUM, or other names you read about. Those are subsets of the concept of a more flexible, business directed approach to software development. The Agile Manifesto was the written start of this idea. Google for it for more information.

B. Davis
[ December 04, 2007: Message edited by: B Davis ]
Kudos for a wonderful book. This is a very new learning design. Can you point us to articles or references elaborating on the adult learning theory behind this break in tradition.

B. Davis
In A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide), the definition of Critical Path is, "The longest path through the project, showing the shortest time in which the project can be completed with no slack or float".

This may be what #5 refers to. The Critical Path is said to be the right way through the project, as it is the fastest way you can do it taking into account all the activities and their relationships to each other.

B. Davis
[ December 04, 2007: Message edited by: B Davis ]
Every three years you are required to prove that you have received hours of additional education and/or certain types of service to your local PMI Chapter, teaching in project management, etc. These hours are called PDUs (Professional Development Units), and at www.pmi.org under their Certification Handbook you can read the specifics of how to earn them.

So, you certification is good for 3 years unless you renew it.

B. Davis
You don't have to have the title of project manager in order to count your work as experience to qualify for the PMP Certification Exam. However, you are asked on the application to list the company, manager, address and phone number of the person who will verify that you did the project management on the projects you claim.

So, that's good news for you, right?

B. Davis
This is a great book for PMP Prep. Go to www.pmi.org for sample exam test questions.

B. Davis
I studied with James Lewis (in person) and have great respect for him. However, the book on which the PMP Exam is bases, A Guide to the Project Manager's Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) has changed since Dr. Lewis wrote his Fundamentals book.

There are many new things that are different and would lead you to make errors on the PMP Exam.

The Head First PMP book, followed by a thorough examination of the PMBOK may be your best bet.

Many local Project Management Institute Chapters have low cost review sessions for you after you have read these books and done some studying on your own. Check out a local chapter (they have them internationally) at pmi.org.

B. Davis
I'm extremely familiar with the Head First PMP, the PMBOK, and Rita's book.

If you are looking to prepare for the PMP Certification test, or just understand project maangement best practices in general, the Head First book really helps you get your mind around the whole process and have it make sense. It also uses the most advanced adult learning theory to help you retain the information without a lot of rote memorization.

Then, you will need to move to the PMBOK (A Guide to the Project Manager's Body of Knowledge) for the nitty, gritty of details that could be on the test. But without the Head First PMP knowledge, the PBMOK can be very confusing.

Rita's book is a more traditional approach to project management.

B. Davis
I also agree. You may want to look at some of the posts on Agile, which is compatible with traditional PMP best practices, but is more realistic about the challenges and unknown issues inherent in software development.

B Davis

Originally posted by Conrad D'Cruz:
There are several ways to do estimates ... analogous (gut feeling), expert judegment (very strong gut feeling), parameteric estimating, and then PERT (3-pt estimates).

Some organizations have come up with very good "science" for estimation (especially the outsource and contracting companies).

Estimates are import (both time and cost) but during execution and M&C of a project the EVM (earned value method) is more important to track the health of the project against the baseline.

Conrad



With respect to your good list of ways to do estimates, let me add that Analogous estimates may also include using past, similar projects to get the Activity estimates for a current project. In this example, they are not "gut feeling".

B Davis
The PMP certification is an internationally recognized designation for people who have identifiable experience in project management, 35 hours of formal training, and who pass a computer based test on project management based on A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide).

You can go to www.pmi.org for more specifics.