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Matt Williams

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since Feb 06, 2008
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Recent posts by Matt Williams

Regarding the configuration -- that truly is the *hard* part about J2EE. Both when I was teaching Java, as well as now, I tell people that the coding's the easy part; configuring it is the hard part.

Why else does J2EE have 5 roles? ;-)

There are some quirks to Ruby configurations, but it is a lot simpler and requires far less time and effort to configure/deploy, not to mention develop!
11 years ago
I, too, would recommend Mr Neighborly's Humble Little Ruby Book. It's quite good, both in the free (and not-free) versions.
11 years ago
Rails is an application framework for developing web-based applications. It works quite well for building websites and/or web applications. Perhaps you've heard of twitter?

Flex works well with it, too -- Manning has a book, Flexible Rails, about that topic.
11 years ago
+1 for Mark

Ruby follows a different sort of OO implementation than Java. In Ruby, *everything* is an object. You don't have pseudo-objects like you do in java (int, char, long).

You communicate with objects via messages -- you send an object the message, either explicitly like foo.bar or implicitly like foo.send(:bar). The arguments are passed (ultimately) as an array. Most of the time you don't need to think of them being passed as such, but it's nice to have available, if needed. Since they're passed as an array, Ruby doesn't really care too much how many arguments are passed (unless you've declared that there are one or more arguments which do not have a default value).

Having the default value, like shown above, really makes more sense to me than overloading. I only need to look in one method to understand what's happening and I can easily create a default behaviour.

When Java came out, I thought it was great. I taught it for Sun for a while, too. My "dayjob" still uses it (at least a chunk of the time). But I've found Ruby to be "fun" and to increase my pleasure in coding.....
11 years ago
First off, what app servers are you using? What JVM? How's your heap allocated? ....

Also, I've found programming ruby as if it is java does not leverage the strengths of the language. I work with someone who was trying to program Ruby as if it were perl, and it's not. The conventions in the language make it easier to develop, imho, and while you can write ruby as though it were just about any language, you'll really lose out if you don't write it like ruby.

Also, for me the main "performance" things are:
1. development speed
2. maintainability
3. satisfaction

Yes, there are environment things which can be done to "speed" it up. But the main question to ask is "how fast does it need to be"? The reduced cost in development and maintenance tend to make up for anything else. And, too, you want to avoid the trap of premature optimization....
11 years ago
Are you looking for a reference manual, an intro to the language, or a cookbook? Also, what do you define as inexpensive?
11 years ago
I'd like to see it. However, I'm afraid that most academics would prefer the "there's only one way to do X" mentality of python.
11 years ago
Yes. Ruby runs very well in an app server, as JRuby. JRuby allows you to mix Ruby and Java code, so you can have the best of both worlds. Also, you can then start developing new features in Ruby if you want. I've found that it's very good for developing web services -- REST can be very nice for that. You might look at Flexible Rails from Manning, given your move to Flex.
11 years ago
Well... Not really. Those would be more like rubygems. The plugins are more application specific (i.e. rails specific) and provide code for the rails environment -- like a forms helper plugin, or something which allows for tagging of posts.
11 years ago
Plugins are "libraries" which provide functionality to a rails application. They could add functionality to models, such as acts_as_list or to controllers or views. Generally they are small pieces of code which do one thing, although some are large and provide much more functionality.
11 years ago
What differentiates groovy from other dynamic languages running in the JVM, such as Jython and JRuby? What are the benefits of choosing groovy over these other languages?

Thanks!
12 years ago
Greetings Venkat.

I am curious what you feel differentiates Groovy from other dynamic languages which run in the JVM, particularly jython and JRuby?
12 years ago
I've been using JRuby; it seems to be a good compromise. That said, one of the ways of getting something in can be via creating a proof of concept and/or demo and showing how quickly you can get something working.

Even so, they're the ones who in the long run have to live with supporting the apps -- if you leave or otherwise are not available they have to find someone who will support it and if they've settled on a particular set of languages that they support, the easier it is to find inhouse resources.
12 years ago
Yes, it is definitely possible.

Here's links to examples:

Calling Java from JRuby
and
Java Integration

You'd be using JRuby and running in the JVM. I've been using rails within a JBoss instance for almost a year at this point....
12 years ago