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Gauthaman Ravindran

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Recent posts by Gauthaman Ravindran

Originally posted by bduncan:
Thanks for the advice!
I guess it must have worked, because I got an offer for a Java Developer position today. Woo woo!
Brooks


Nice work! It occurred to me after my original reply that QA and programmers are sort of natural enemies in the software development world. But now that you're a developer, you'll be able to find this out for yourself!
21 years ago

Originally posted by kwame Iweg*:
Thank you. This is exactly the answer to my question. But what about the issue of job opportunities for web developers/programmers? I hear a lot about how there is a shortage of information technology professionals in Canada, and then on the other hand one also hears of how there are fewer job opportunities than in the US! How does this work out.


There is a "shortage" of IT professionals in both Canada and the US. Unfortunately, this is probably as much a matter of companies being rather picky instead of any genuine shortfall in the number of qualified people. However, if you have 2+ years in Java, you should have no problem finding a job in either Canada or the US. It's true that there are more jobs in the US, but then again, the US has more people than Canada, and a larger number of technical companies. But there are definitely jobs to be found in Canada. As a matter of fact, I'm looking for work right now (although in Unix system administration, not necessarily Java). I posted my resume on three web job boards on Sunday night, and I've already received calls from a half dozen recruiters with jobs in Toronto (where I live).
The major obstacle is experience -- if you have it (and I do, nearly five years) then finding a job is much easier than when you're starting afresh.
If I may ask, where are you based now? What is your job experience like?

[This message has been edited by Gauthaman Ravindran (edited September 13, 2000).]
21 years ago
The fact that there are people who make their careers out of doing QA should be a warning sign -- QA is as much of a career track as programming is.
If you "sold your soul" to Microsoft, would you be able to get a job as a programmer more easily? You said that you were a new graduate, and it can be tough to get that first job.
You might want to consider keeping your eye out for really small companies that are just starting out. The pay won't be good, but the important thing is to get that crucial first few months of programming experience. Then you can parlay that into something better.
[This message has been edited by Gauthaman Ravindran (edited September 13, 2000).]
21 years ago

Originally posted by kwame Iweg*:
Also how would a person making 60k in say Toronto, compare with someone in a major US city making the same income, factoring in things like cost of living, taxation, exchange rate? (Average rent in suburban N. Bronx, NY >= $1,100 for two bedroom apt), Tax approx 18-25%( Fed + state); Transportation/ mth approx $70.00;


In general, taxes are higher in Toronto, but rent is cheaper, although it depends on which city you're comparing it to. In general, if you're making $60000 CDN in Toronto, you'll live about as well as if you were making $60000 US in New York. Canadians who move to the States usually do so when they can make an extra $20000 US (that is, a person making $60000 in Toronto would want to make $80000 US in the States), or if the job they can get in the States has better opportunities for career development. And as I mentioned above, it depends on which region or city you're comparing it to -- New York is expensive, San Francisco is extremely expensive, and Texas tends to be rather less expensive.
The other thing to consider is the exchange rate. Even though $1 US is about $1.50 CDN, that does not accurately reflect the value of the Canadian dollar (that is, prices are not, in general, 50% higher in Canada. A $900 US/month apartment in Chicago would go for $900 CDN in Toronto). So if you make US dollars and bring them back to Canada, you get more for your money.

21 years ago
Did the exam this morning. Happy with the score, except that I'm starting to feel like an underacheiver with all the 93+ score that get posted here!
In particular, I found the Java Rules Roundup game very useful. Although the questions are not really similar to the exam questions, the concepts they test are absolutely crucial for passing the exam.
The links to the various mock exams were also quite useful.
Gauth

Originally posted by wonda:
Thank you! I'm almost clear now.
But what kind file " does not exist and can not be created"? The existing directory as you said?


Well, a read-only filesystem, or a full filesystem might qualify. In either case, the program could look and see that no such file existed, but would not be able to create a new file.

The biggest omission is GridBagLayout. RHE says that it isn't even covered on the exam, even though there have been many reports of GridBagLayout questions. I've also heard that the I/O section is rather weak.
Gauth
When you override a method, the new method cannot have an access modifer that is *more* private than the parent method. In this case, the parent method is private, and the child method is default, so this is okay. That being said, I'm not sure if this is really "overriding". Since the private method in the parent is not available to the child class, it seems that you would not really be overriding the method here. Instead, you would simply be making a new method which coincidentally has the same name as a method in the parent class. The two methods would not be otherwise related.
I'm sure someone will clarify this for both of us.
Gauth

Originally posted by K2 Joshi:
byte b = 11;
byte b1 = 12;
b = b * b1 ; ( everything is byte then how it is converting to int.)
can any one help me?
Thanks in advance
Ketu


The multiplication you are doing is subject to arithmetic promotion. Bytes and shorts are cast to ints when they are multiplied (also when added, subtracted and divided). So what happens is actually: b = (int)b*(int)b1. Because of this, the result of the multiplication is an int as well. However, b is a byte, so you are trying to assign an int to a byte, which is an illegal assignment.
Gauth


To execute a class you need the fully qualified name. When you type java Test, it is looking for Test with no package declaration in the current working directory. What it finds is Test.class that belongs to com.deepak.jav so, isn't the currect one and you get a classnotfound error.
A fully qualified name is the package followed by the class name
ie com.deepak.jav.Test!


Ah. I understand too, now. Thanks.
Gauth
What happens when you change directory to c:\com\deepak\jav and type java Test?
Gauth
1. c:\com\deepak\jav\java Test would try to run a java interpreter in the c:\com\deepak\jav directory. Do you have one there?
2. Is there a Test.class file in the place you think it is? Is it actually in c:\com\deepak\jav?
3. Since your classpath only mentions \ and . as directories where classes would be found, I don't know if it will find c:\com\deepak\jav\Test.class. I could be wrong on this point, though.
Gauth