margaret gillon

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since Nov 12, 2008
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Recent posts by margaret gillon

Is there any way to stop another web site from loading my site into a frame on the calling web site? In other words the user finds a reference to my site on a third party site. They click the link and think they are coming to my site but instead they stay on the original site that loads my site into a frame designed to mimic my site. Does that make sense?

The CMS does seem logical because I agree at some point the managers are going to want to cut the costs of having all documents converted by coders and they would be happier if administrative staff could modify the web site. But CMS seem to have many added costs. Say we are talking about Drupal. I have seen vendors quote for up to 120K to set up the Drupal. A vendor has to set it up and design it for the company. Many vendors that do the set up also provide the hosting. I have looked at pricing and a hosted 30GB Drupal site is around 400 dollars a month. I have seen quotes of 1,000 a month for 50GB Drupal hosting. Then the vendor has to be retained in case there are issues with the Drupal that require tech support. Normally it runs on mysql and I although Drupal is open source not all of mysql is open source and I think there are license fees now at some level.

Also I still can't find out if Drupal is accessible. I see threads about accessibility on their web site in the support rooms but not much on the main site.
2 years ago
Consider a large web site for a city that adds as many as 100 documents to the site each month. The documents will not change after being posted, they are things like council meeting minutes, meeting schedules, resolutions passed to manage the community, clubs, summer events, community resources , etc. The city wants the documents to remain even after they are no longer current so they can be searched for historical information -- for instance the users could see when a resolution passed, who voted for it, and how long ago it was applied. It is critical that the web site stays light for old machines. It is critical that it is fully accessible to disabled users. It would need to be searchable by all engines.

I think there is merit in writing a site like this in plain HTML with CSS3. Other techies I know debate and think a CMS system would be better.

If the site were being supported by a developers (and techies to convert the documents) , not by non-technical people, do others think HTML would be better ?
2 years ago
Is there any kind of certification by some standards organization, like ISO, that developers can earn to prove their talent for creating accessible friendly WCAG 2.0 web sites?
Luke suggested

Terry Goodkind's "Sword of Truth" novels

The kindle version of the first novel in this series is on sale today at Amazon for $1.99 (regular price $8.99). Better yet you can buy the Audible audio version of the book for only $0.99 (regular price $27.97) if you buy it with the Kindle version. I buy the Kindle + Audible books all the time because of the amazingly low prices. There is an Audible app for playing the files on Android phones.

Amazon Daily Deal Wizard's First Rule (Sword of Truth Book 1)
3 years ago
Chris you said

I enjoyed the fantasy novel The Scar by China Mieville.


This book is the second book of a series. It looks interesting. Did you have to read the first book or does this book work as a stand alone novel?
3 years ago
Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden, and Bobsey Twins are children's books with a reading age beginning around 6 to 7 years old.
3 years ago
Fantasy , one of my favorites, by author mentioned already:
Dragonsong (Pern: Harper Hall #1) by Anne McCaffrey is one of my favorite books about a young girl who loves music but lives in a fishing community that thinks her talent is frivolous. Her father goes to great measures to stop her from playing music and she eventually runs away and bonds with a group of miniature dragons. This is the first book in a trilogy.

For mysteries --
Nevada Barr's Anna Pigeon mystery series is good. Anna is a national park ranger.
Alafair Burke's Ellie Hatcher series. Ellie is a NYPD detective.
Joy Castro's Nola Cespedes Mysteries. Nola is a crime reporter for a post-Katrina New Orleans newspaper.
Tess Gerritsen's Rizzoli & Isles series. The TV show is based on these books but the books are much richer, and darker, than the tv series.

Deborah Crombie's Duncan Kincaid & Gemma James series. Both protagonists are British police Inspectors at Scotland Yard. They eventually marry. At different times they work under each other. Both want a good personal life but both are career oriented and love their work as detectives. Interesting dynamics between the relationship, the work, and the politics at work when they find internal coverups in their investigations.

Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta series. Scarpetta is "Chief Medical Examiner for the Commonwealth of Virginia at Richmond. She is also known as one of the top forensic pathologist in the country. " These are dark and sometimes stark.

3 years ago
For fantasy novels with female protagonist here is a list of strong female fantasy on with approximately 3,662 books. The list is described as

Best "Strong Female" Fantasy Novels. List of fantasy novels featuring strong women.
This includes: general fantasy, urban fantasy, young adult fantasy, fairy tale retellings, etc.... These women kick ass!

3 years ago
Vonda McIntyre has many great science fiction novels and series with female protagonists. My all time favorite by her is "DREAMSNAKE". She wrote Star Trek novels as well as her own series. If you will read books in ebook format she is part of an authors cooperative that has other authors also writing science fiction and fiction. Some of the ebooks are ebook editions of books originally published in paper. Others are ebook originals. The cooperative is Book View Cafe .
3 years ago
I remember reading this series from 70's or 80's but I cannot find it. Here is what I remember.

It is sci-fi not sci-fantasy. The protagonist ends up as a space ship captain. She may have been one when the series starts but I don't remember.

She works and/or lives on a planet covered with some kind of fog or mist. People on the planet travel on horses. To navigate it when traveling people follow strings. Learning how to read the strings is a skill that is learned.

A some point a tool is introduced that lets a person alter their body. The person envisions the alterations and then twists the tool which is in the shape of a bar. I do not know if the tool can change gender. What I remember is that it only changes physical characteristics like hair, muscles, skin color, etc.

The planet gets taken over by a fundamentalist group and all the women loose rights to work or travel. They must wear dresses and may be chained. Their bodies are altered by the men in power so they look like Barbie dolls (exaggerated playboy bodies). The women must stay at home and raise as many children as the men impregnate them with.

It turns out that the fog that covers the planet is generated by a computer system to protect the planet. The strings that are physical objects on the planet, are representations of computer strings (algorithms) that the computer generated as navigational devices for residents.

Eventually the planet is freed from the fundamentalists through an uprising the protagonist is involved in. I believe this happens by the rebels finding the computer system that is creating the planet's environment. By the time this happens the protagonist has a young son, I think between 3 and 7 years old.

The protagonist goes back into space with the body altering bar that all people now have access to. She alters her body so that she is a warrior, strong muscles, finger nails the strength of claws that can release poison, enhanced eyesight, etc. Her son goes with her but is still adjusting to the fact that his mother, and the other women on the ship, are now warriors not barbie dolls in dresses.

I would like to re-read the series. Does anyone remember the series or the author?
3 years ago
My PBS station has been broadcasting the series "Shakespeare Uncovered." The station also has the full length PBS versions of the plays mentioned in this thread online so they can be streamed. I am watching the Uncovered episodes and then finding the full version of the plays the episode discusses and watching them.
3 years ago

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Only if they would have bought the book.


I don't think the library buying the book changes buying patterns of readers. Like you I use my library quite a bit and only spend dollars on things I go back to.

Another thing about libraries, they work hard to support small publishers. I had librarians that had budgets for special collections. They would use the budget to buy from presses like mine. It helped us to get that kind of support and exposure at some of the universities they represented.
3 years ago

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:
One of the objections to the library is that it "doesn't help the authors." I don't get this. The library paid for its copies. How is this any different than me buying a copy and selling it as soon as I am done. Or me buying a used a copy. I keep my computer books for reference. I keep very few novels or other books. Even a series I bought (because the library doesn't own it), I'm giving away when I'm done.

In publishing authors are usually paid royalties based on number of books sold. Since there is no sale in kindle unlimited, or prime, I don't think a royalty is paid. Publishers control distribution rights so the publisher would decide if the kindle edition was speech enabled or can be loaned. Authors self-publishing may be pushed to be involved. Amazon can be heavy handed. When I was a book publisher I took a loss on books I sold on Amazon but I sold books there so people could find the author and hopefully, next sale, buy from a store that took less of a fee.

The library question is an old debate. An author gets huge exposure when a library buys their book and the book finds new readers. But does the library owning a copy stop someone from buying it instead so losing the author sales? If 100 people get the book at the library the author has lost royalties on 99 books.

I have many friends that will buy the new book because they don't want to wait months for the library book. I think the exposure in the library outweighs the possible lost sales.

The Canadian PLR program is great. It would be nice if other countries did the same.
3 years ago