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Carlisia Campos

sanitation engineer
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since Aug 22, 2001
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Recent posts by Carlisia Campos

Is it possible for a web app to read files that are stored on a directory outside of the web server? These files need to be viewed over http. If so, what should I be using? I figure that there should be some type of mapping between the app and the directory.

Thanks,
15 years ago

Originally posted by stara szkapa:

Can one have a life in Boston on $45? Let's say someone wants to support wife and two children.


If you have no debt and a modest life style, then yes. Since, your biggest overheads would be car and hoursing, you should at least check the price to rent or buy a place at bostonapartments.com to have a better idea.
16 years ago
If you're asking if you can get away with not wearing a suit, I'd say yes, unless you're interviewing for a job in which you'll be meeting with clients. Even if suits are not required when meeting with clients, it will show your best presentation and it counts.
For all other jobs, you probably can get away without wearing a tie as well. Americans are pretty laid back in general, and very much so with clothing. That said, when I interview, I dress my best always. Even if the job looks so-so, since it might turn up to be better than the job description. And if I go in to talk salary, I dress even better! That's because, in my experience, offers are always below what you expect and negotiation is always necessary. Just in case people are even for a second going to judge how much salary I should need based on what I'm wearing. You don't think it happens?.... ha! Plus, I'm more confident when I weare my best clothes. On this note: I've given up wearing suits. I usually wear a nice skirt/blouse/jacket combination that makes me really confortable, and that makes a lot of difference.
16 years ago
I might have an offer coming soon. I like the job, the only remaining factor is the salary. It's a public company (~400 employees). Right at the beginning they told me what the salary range was. I am qualified and then some. They loved me, and there is a unique attribute combination that I'm bringing in for the position that would be hard for them to find. The thing is that I would like to make at least 10% more than the top of their range. Being that they already told me what the range is and the fact that they are a reasonably large company, do you think there is room to negociate? I've never ran into a situation where they tell you the range even before the real interviews, it's a little puzzling to me how far I can go here. I am expecting that they will play hard ball and the first time I say I would like more they will inform me again of the top of the range. If it comes to that, should I press?
16 years ago
Depending on what kind of biz you want to be in later on, the consulting gig might give you great experience for that.
16 years ago
There are so many things to take into account that we don't know about. Some that I can think of right now:
-will you like working at home, without the contact of other adults during the work hours?
-do you see yourself with enough flexibility in your career that if the consulting goes caput you will not have a problem waiting for another job?
-how concerned are you with professional growth, and which company best fif with your goals? Think about trainning, possibilities for transfering to other positions/locations, etc.
-what's the level of responsibilities you will have?
You should evaluate on the basis of what's best for your current AND long term goals.
Try not to let the fame of a big name lure you if it's not an ideal POSITION for YOU.
16 years ago
I would wait until you have at least your first interview, since it seems that it's going to happen before your two weeks are up. If the interview goes well, then mention the things you liked about the second company and the benefits that you'll be bringing to it, and that you have an offer for a compatible position (if it is) else where and that you have x number of days to accept/decline. When you are searching for a job, it's completly normal to be in your situation, and letting the interviewer know only **helps** them make the correct decision at the correct time. But they'll only change the pace if they see a potential in you, and before you have an interview they might not feel motivated to do anything since at that point you are only one more resume.
16 years ago
If one started earning x at some point, no benefits, at job 1, and afterwords I acquired a MsCS plus 2 years experience, how much of a salary increase should one reasonably expect for job 2 (a new job, with benefits)? Suppose the job requirements could be different a little, and that one was fully qualified for both? 10%? 40%? More?
16 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

If most people don't want it, they will simply not buy it and the producers will stop selling it. That's how the free market works.
--Mark


We have GM products here in the US. But when and where was the last time you saw it advertised as so? Even if GM were to be labeled, would I have to get a PhD on the subject, or would I be able to be educated as the differences and potential dangers of GM? Whether 10 years is enough to prove that the consumption of GM is safe is a matter of opinion, so those who are of the opinion that more time has to go by for them to be sure, and that they don't want to be guinea pigs in the process, have the right to want to regulate the market.
16 years ago
They might ask 1...3 thing(s) you learned in your last job(s)/school.
16 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

Um, don't you?
--Mark


In terms of what people actually do, no. Many software engineers don't know a thing about anything related to the software engineering process but code. But I see how the s. engineer title would atract more competent programmers, so actually it makes sense that the demand for the later will surely be much greater.
16 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

Lack of competance. One guy with 12 years experience couldn't explain a hash table. Another had communication issues and lacked technical curiosity. Another just wasn't impressive.
--Mark


Can you give us an idea of what the average technical experience in terms of years for these candidates is? And what was actually the number of years that you advertised you wanted?
On a similar subject, do you think that there are a lot of employed people waiting for some good positions to open to change jobs? Perhaps they are not in the market yet?
16 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
I'm finding lots of software engineers, but most aren't who I want to hire. They seem unqualified. Perhaps they are better than I think they are, but they just don't come across that way.
It'll be interesting to see what happens if this continues for an extended period of time.
--Mark


If most of what you are finding are not fit for what you are looking for, there are many things you, as management, can do, such as training and offshoring. If you were not able to find a perfect fit today, how long would you be willing to wait to find it until you decided it's time to pursue another course of action, and which would it be?
16 years ago
Programmer: average growth
Software Engineer: much faster than average growth
Apparently they see a world of difference between the two...
16 years ago
I got the book yesterday, and I love it! I wasn't even planning on taking this exam right now, but since the book is sooooo funny, I just want to keep reading it, so I thought I better as well study it seriously and take the exam. Seriously, it is the funniest technical book you'll ever have seen. I think Kathy and Bert were right on target with the choice of style and tone for the book. After this one, I'll never want to read another boring technical book ever again!
Besides the funny drawings, pictures, and notes, the content is really well organized and focused on what you need to know.