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Jason Ross

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since Mar 12, 2009
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Recent posts by Jason Ross

Thank you, Jesper. Is it considered "safe" to allow the client to do that?
7 years ago
I didn't know where else to ask this. Sorry admins if it's in the wrong place.

I understand that Nashorn is the new Javascript engine in Java8, and Rhino was in Java7. But I don't see any use case for having a JS engine in the Java. I've seen the demos of people doing "hello world" in JS and then running it in a basic Java command line app, but that's not a practical example.

Can anyone give me a scenario where it's useful to have a JS engine in the VM?
7 years ago
Hi,

I'm new to Spring MVC, and the Spring FW in general. My previous experience is with PHP (Zend FW) and C#/ASP.NET MVC.

I'm used to having this URL mapping convention supported in all of frameworks I've worked in:

http://www.domain.com/myController/action/[optional parameters]

The framework would then look for a class named "MyControllerController," and a method in that controller named "Action" and execute it. For example:



I've seen some examples of controllers and read the Spring documentation. It looks like that convention is not supported in Spring MVC. Am I correct? You have to explicitly declare the mapping in either a bean config file or use a @RequestMapping annotation?
10 years ago
Hi guys, I'm still new to Spring and I haven't done Java dev in a while. I'm current a .NET developer.

My question is, what is the proper setup for a local development environment? I understand I need the latest JDK, and Eclipse/NetBeans. But do I also need a web server like Tomcat?

Are there articles about how to wire up Eclipse, Spring and Tomcat together into a seamless development environment?

I'm used to having Visual Studio's built-in web server, Cassini. I just write my code, then hit Debug and it's all up and running for me. With Java, it's a little more hairy. Any help would be much appreciated.
10 years ago
That's awesome, I love it. Thank you, Rose!
I current develop using PHP for contract work, but I'm also learning JSP/Servlets with Tomcat on my own time.

For now, I have 2 directories, one with the Eclipse for JEE, and one for Eclipse for PHP. I would like a single installation of Eclipse that can handle both PHP and Java. Is there a way to do that? Can someone please give me a run down or point me to the right place to look?

Thank you and I appreciate any help you can provide.