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David Kane

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Recent posts by David Kane

Here is what Orion claims:
http://www.orionserver.com/benchmarks/benchmark.html
However, I'm not sure that the question really should be what is the most scalable. I think the more important question is which tool is scalable enough for what you need. Are you talking 100's, 1,000's 10,000's or more simultaneous connections?
Dave

Originally posted by Pres Brawner:
I can run any of these servlet engines on my own box, but which are most scalable? Has anyone tried using Orion in a production environment? JRun... I've heard it's ok for some things but stinks for others. I suppose I should also ask about WebSphere and WebLogic. I've actually used WebLogic and it seems to work great.
What are your thoughts?



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
16 years ago
You could close the browser window that contains the applet.
Dave
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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
16 years ago
It's worth noting that at the time, there were many different competing OO methodoligies and notations. And while there wasn't necessarily agreement on what methology should be used,
UML was an attempt to at least standardize the notation.
Not have such standards was a real pain. I remember working with a "meta" case tool, that could be instantiated for any one of a number of notation styles. It was a much more complex and expensive than would be needed today.
Dave
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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Folks,
Thanks for the stories. (And if you haven't posted yet, please do). It is because we have heard and experienced many similar stories that we thought it would be worth writing our book.
One thing that intrigues me from some of the stories here, is the question of nationality. All of our direct study was of companies in the US and Canda. G mentioned his experiences in Portugal. Do you folks think there are significant differences in how people interact in north american software development organizations versus those in other countries? Have any of you worked in both situations?
Dave
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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
These are the kinds of questions that are at the heart of the book.

Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
Dave does your book address these questions as well



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
It depends on the context. The essential characterstic though is that components, API's and the like are shared.
Dave

Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
hi
Dave how would you define significant size of software architecture. what size is significant



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Well, that was about the time that they got a new CEO :+)
Dave

Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
Loss of 1billion $ Nortel must have gone mad at its software architects and the related staff



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
The short answer is yes. The firm rebounded. In part because they took made a substantial investment in their architecture. What is interesting is how the experience colored the experience of the engineers, architects and managers we met.

Originally posted by FEI NG:
Story on a $1 billion loss, does it have a happy ending?
What usually happened after a $1 billion loss? What happened to the software architecture people?



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Folks,
The question you cite has not even been posted 24 hours yet, and this thread has been up all week. So on a per/day basis the posting rates are comparable.

Originally posted by G Vanin:
Anybody,
can explain me why this thread has a record number of posts and nobody shows up to answer Dave's question in http://www.javaranch.com/ubb/Forum9/HTML/000822.html?? Just VERY curious


While I'm not Carl, I'll take a stab at your other question. Obviously, architects and managers have much more at stake, and much more control over some of the issues I've mentioned. However, I think that folks who today are "just programmers" today need to understand organizational issues if they want to extend their influence beyond the code they are directly writing.
Dave

Originally posted by G Vanin:
Carl,
after reading your review in the Bunkhouse Design Patterns UML and Refactoring, I would like to know if this book is useful just for programmer (I am not inside mentioned positions and prefer blowing up the current experience)?
[This message has been edited by G Vanin (edited November 15, 2001).]



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Bilal,
My apologies. I thought I had, and while I found I had posted that quoted you, I didn't find my response. I must have mistyped something. Let me try this one again.
We believe that the organizational principles are complete. In our paper in Computer in which we first widely published the model, we had a 6th principle that focused on risk, but we realized the management of risk was at the core of all the principles, and so we folded it back in. We've tested the model with multiple case studies, and by validating with experts such as Grady Booch and Robert Charette.
However, if there is a principle that you think is missing, I would be interested to hear your thought on that.
Dave

Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
hiiiiiii
Dave did you answer this question. if yes than yyy cant i find anything


Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
Dave
you said that ur book is organized around 5 principles. does there exists any more principles .If yes can you mention them. Further more can you briefly describe as what these principles really are



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Of course, you can use patterns to express solutions to architecture problems.
Dave

Originally posted by BILAL HAMEED:
dear Dave
do software architectures also have patterns???



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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Folks,
Many of you have been keeping me busy the last couple days with your many questions. Allow me to turn the tables a bit, and ask you a question or two.
I'd be interested to hear about your experiences with organizations and software architecture. Have you witnessed any of the following, or similar problem?
* Develop a new architecture, but the folks who were supposed to use it, never adopt it?
* Friction between two groups wanting to go different directions with an architecture?
* Develop an architecture, but by the time you wer able to start using using it, conditions had changed, and it was not longer as useful any more?
I'd be interested to hear your stories.
Dave

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David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com
Doug,
Architecture becomes important for projects of any significant size. In particular, architecture is important whenever you have software that is being shared. These days, at a minimum, virtually every software developer is a consumer of some third party's architcture or framework.
Dave

Originally posted by Doug Wang:
So who and when should care the architectural issue in software development? Does a team really need that?
[/B]



------------------
David Kane
david_kane@houseofyin.com
Author of Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns
http://www.vraps.com
http://www.houseofyin.com