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Eric Bruno

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Recent posts by Eric Bruno

Also, the book "JavaFX: Developing Rich Internet Applications" has an entire chapter dedicated to JavaFX and REST, including using XML and JSON-based web services. You can check this out here: http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=013701287X

Also, you can find sample code for all of this at www.jfxbook.com

-Eric
12 years ago
Don't drop your Groovy knowledge yet. Although JavaFX Script is the language for JavaFX development, you can utilize your investment in Groovy code through its Java interface. Take a look at this earlier thread on this site for more information:

https://coderanch.com/t/449926/Swing-AWT-SWT-JFace/java/Would-you-recommend-using-Groovy

Personally, I don't have much experience with Groovy and haven't used it from JavaFX at all, so you'll have to take it from here. But apparently it works. Good luck!
12 years ago
It certainly makes for an easy install. I hear more people complain about applications that are difficult to install than those that are as simple as drag and drop.

EOL
12 years ago
Thanks and I appreciate what you said about download sizes and time. It is indeed easy to get spoiled by high-speed Internet access. Remember also that with JavaFX you can easily build standalone GUI applications that can leverage your existing Java code. This eliminates the RIA-aspect of it. It will also work on mobile devices in the near future, which will be more appealing to those without high-bandwidth Internet connections to the desktop.
12 years ago
It's simply an option. If a user doesn't want the JavaFX applet on their desktop, they just won't drag it there. But if they do want it, they have the option to drag it off of the browser.
12 years ago
No need to argue about it. Download size is a valid point, and knowing this, Sun has made the Java platform more modular so that smaller pieces will be downloaded on demand as opposed to one large JRE as in the past. Going forward, this will be enhanced in the next version of Java. Sun is aware of the selling points of Flex and is working to make sure JavaFX compares well in all aspects. If you're looking for something negative to say about JavaFX, I'm sure you'll find something. However, if as a Java developer you keep your mind open to the fact that it allows you to build Flex-like Internet applications in Java, you might find it works well. My suggestion: give it a try and determine if it's right for you. If it is, then you have increased your tool-kit and knowledge base. If not, stick with what works well for you.
12 years ago
You're welcome. I hope the explanation wasn't too overwhelming, but there's a lot to real-time programming in general, as well as the RTSJ.
12 years ago
JavaFX applications can run on the desktop as standalone applications, via WebStart, or from a browser as an applet. Also, they will run on mobile devices that support JavaFX Mobile. That's the power of JavaFX. Therefore, JavaFX should be ideal for your GUI application. You should give it a try and judge for yourself.
12 years ago
I agree with you 100%. I've worked with Ajax and believe that if it's the right tool for the job, use it. No problem there. Larry was coming at it from the perspective that JavaScript can be difficult to use, and some of the tools to develop/deploy/debug Ajax are lacking. JavaFX, since it leverages Java and its existing tools (such as NetBeans), can potentially make it easier to build similar apps. It's going to come to execution on that promise, as well as personal preference by those who use it. So in short, Larry's comments don't echo my own, but I understand the point he's making about JavaScript.
12 years ago
Yeah, that was only Larry Ellison who made those comments!
12 years ago
I suggest reviewing the posts and replies here since Tuesday, as well as visiting www.javafx.com for detailed answers. In a nutshell, it makes it VERY EASY for Java developers to build GUI apps that run on the desktop, in the browser, and in mobile devices. If you use Flex to build rich internet apps, but wish you could leverage your Java knowledge and code, JavaFX is the answer.
12 years ago
As a general rule, if the device supports the JavaFX Mobile platform, it should be true (even if you wrap Swing). That doesn't mean it will run on ANY mobile device. For instance, the two you mention don't even support Java, so no JavaFX there either.
12 years ago
You can review the web casts from JavaOne 2009 where there was a slide with this information, and it was spoken about several times.
12 years ago
Well, I honestly don't know much about GWT, and have not used it myself. My advice, with any technology, is to try it yourself and draw your own conclusions. Too many times, I've seen comparisons of one technology to the other that were biased, based on one person's (or group's) preferences, that I've always decided to try things myself. For instance, the C++ vs. Java argument that went on for years, Eclipse vs. NetBeans, Windows vs. Mac OS X, and now JavaFX vs. Flex, or SilverLight, or GWT, and so on. They all seem to have strengths and weeknesses and will appeal to different people differently. I like JavaFX because it's almost like an extension to Java, with a powerful language that makes it quick and easy to build GUIs, and runs on desktops and mobile devices alike. Let me know what you think after you've played with it. Try it at www.javafx.com

-Eric
12 years ago