Win a copy of Svelte and Sapper in Action this week in the JavaScript forum!

Dorothy Finkel-Laverty

Ranch Hand
+ Follow
since Nov 24, 2001
Cows and Likes
Cows
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
0
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Ranch Hand Scavenger Hunt
expand Greenhorn Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Dorothy Finkel-Laverty

I think XML needs to be embraced by the data base community before it can take the place that many people think it should have. When more and more databases provide easy to use tools with XML, then it might take off.

However, I also think that the days of one "super language" or even "super data-manipulation tool" like XML, are over. COBOL was the last of those big-time stars.
16 years ago
Bubble sort is named "bubble" because the largest value (or the smallest value, depending on whther you use < or > in your comparison) will float to the top of the list, like a bubble in a tank of water.

Assume you have a list of numbers, a, b, and c. The bubble sort is a variation on a swap - you compare two numbers, if a > b, then swap a & b. Next, compare (the new) b to c. At the end of the first iteration, the largest value will be at the top of the list. Simply start at the bottom of the list, and do it again. You are done when you pass through the list and no swaps take place.

There are several variation on it to enhance processing time - such as:
the first time through, loop n times, where n is the number of items in the list - 1. Next time, loop n-2 times (because you know that the largest value is already at the top, there is no need to compare it and waste the cycles). I will leave you to discover the other variations.

Good luck!
16 years ago
Couldn't you use a session object to do this?
16 years ago
JSP
So let's talk about WHY the other lines would generate compiler errors.
"abstract" says that the method MUST be overridden.
"final" says that the method CANNOT be overridden.
Since they are in conflict, the compiler will generate error messages. There were lots of questions like this on the exam when I took it a few years back.
That explains lines 2 & 3 -
Line 4 cannot compile because there is no class B, since the earlier lines did not compile. Also, class B is supposed to be final, so you can't extend it.
[ December 16, 2003: Message edited by: Dorothy Finkel-Laverty ]
The common theme is that these answers all have in common is that you are reassigning NULL to the object. Since we can't have one object reference (variable name) pointing to two different locations in the heap, the existing object is no longer needed, and therefore, can be flagged for garbage collection. Once you understand that, it is a matter of seeing which object is released (has null assigned to it) first in the order in which the statements will be executed. That's why it is [1].
Better?
I can give another reason for taking a certification like this one - I am a teacher, and learn new computer languages to teach the "hot" ones. Without practical on-the-job experience, a certification is a good way to ensure that you know the basics well (you've got to know them real well to explain them to newbies!), as well as to add to your resume as "proof" that you know the language well.
Yes, Marcus, I have some advice. Find "real" work to add to your resume. Volunteer. Develop a web site for free. Write some Java GUI applications that a grammar school can use, and donate to your local school. Put your name on all the work.
There are loads of good, deserving organizations that could use software products that you can develop in a couple of days. The more you develop, the more experience you can claim . . . AND, think of all those networking contacts you'll be developing!
16 years ago
Interesting! I found that if you chanage your a & b to final, then you don't have to typecase the sum of the addition to a short. I guess the compiler says "Hmmmm. The sm of a and b might sometimes be too large to put in a short." in the first case, but when you say they are final, then it knows that they will never be different from the values you assigned to them. Try the final!
17 years ago
Verduka - take a look at the String class' "replace" methods - you can probably handle this in one or two lines of code.
17 years ago
JSP
Are you using Apache Tomcat? If so, then you can look at a folder under that directory called "work", and it will show you the actual compile messages. May help in your troubleshooting. You can also see your source code (servlet), which is a good tool for learning.

Dorothy
17 years ago
JSP
While I won't make suggestions on this scenario, because I don't think there is one and only one right answer, I can give you some questions to figure it out yourself in your specific environment.
How much volume of data are we talking about here? If you do the manipulation on the Oracle side, you could conceivably cut down on the amount of data you have to pass over the communication lines. Is that an issue for you?
Would you be doing the Oracle programming yourself? Where are your skills better?
Could some of these be stored procedures in Oracle, allowing you to take advantage of some of the processing efficiencies Oracle offers?
Will you have to run around to install stuff on client machines if you put the processing in the front end?
Are you doing this project "for real", or is it an academic exercise? If it's an academic exercise, I'd do it both ways.
There are a whole bunch more questions that could be asked, but I think this gives you a start.
Good luck!
I can't say enough good things about this book. The first section is all on setup - care and feeding of your JSP environment, including how to install & use Tomcat. First book I have seen that explains that topic in English, so that I now can do things that I have been trying to do for 6 months, but couldn't find discussed clearly. The two-page format is great for all learning styles - you've got the theory on the left, and the example on the right. I have been able to do all the examples. This book has really helped me to jump start my JSP learning curve.
17 years ago
JSP
Couldn't you go simpler, and pass a serialization of object as a hidden field inside of the form?
If worst comes to worst, you could pass the parameters as hidden text fields inside the form, and reconstruct the object again on the other side.
17 years ago
JSP
It's an SQL thing - the word DISTINCT refers to the entire row, not just one column. As such, it belongs, syntactically, before the list of all columns.
Silly question, but have you thought about using a MouseListener? You can count the clicks and everything. The problem with the solution you are proposing is that even if the user tabs to the text field, the event will be fired. Is that what you want?
17 years ago