Igor Mechnikov

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since Feb 13, 2011
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Recent posts by Igor Mechnikov

Junilu Lacar wrote:Thanks Igor,

Very interesting to learn about the automatic insertion of semicolons. I may like this "feature" after all when you think about not having to worry about the trailing commas when you move lines around.



Exactly right, I saw this very point lauded in the discussion above.
6 years ago
Go

Junilu Lacar wrote:A couple of other things:

Just went out to http://tour.golang.org and the example above now seems to be #22 instead of #21 -- [EDIT: I see what it is now. I downloaded the tour for offline viewing. The difference is that the offline version doesn't have the #2 page that the online version does, so offline version has all the pages shifted down by one]

Something strange about the fmt.Println() in main(). If you keep the original formatting given in the example, the comma after the second parameter is required; deleting it will give you a compilation error. However, if I reformat the code and put everything in one line, removing that last comma is fine. That's a bit surprising. What gives here?



I found an explanation "Composite literals require trailing commas before newlines because of how semi-colon insertion works: http://golang.org/ref/spec#Semicolons" in this discussion: http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.go.general/64463
6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield wrote:Hi Igor,

I think it depends on how much experience you have in general, and with the language your using and the problem domain in particular. If you're new to the language or problem domain I suspect that you'll find it hard to maintain a mental image of the program no matter what language its in; and easy if you are very familiar with the language and the domain.



Food for thought.
Thank you again.
6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield wrote:
If you want more specific ideas then I think a good starting point are the Unix classics: grep, find, ls, and so on---the first two could be made concurrent.



I will attempt this today. And I believe someone at the University of California already tried to redo Unix utilities in Go, so there is something to compare.
Thank you Mark for answering all my queries.
6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield wrote:
I don't use an IDE at all for anything: instead I use gvim (with all the menus and toolbars hidden:-)



I am interested in trying GVim, actually installed it awhile back but kept getting lost in windows file systems to do anything useful with it and returned to Linux.
I usually boot my thinkpad into Ubuntu but the battery life and wi-fi performance is pretty sad compared to Windows.
Is there a guide to programming Go using GVim under Windows?
6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield wrote:
You can do functional style programming in Go, but it certainly isn't a functional language. In fact, no functional language has proven to be successful outside academia.



Could Erlang be an example of a functional language successful outside academia?
6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield I know that some very high traffic sites are using Go.[/quote wrote:

Could you be a little more specific about successful use of Go at these sites?

6 years ago
Go

Mark Summerfield wrote:
I would advocate learning Go by getting a good book and writing some Go programs. By the end of that process you'll have much more of an idea of Go's strengths and weaknesses in relation to the kind of programs you are interested in.



What would be some good beginning programs/tasks to learn Go?
6 years ago
Go
I took a look at Go Tour.
Are there any exercises, perhaps with walk through solutions, that are a step above 'Hello World'?
Maybe a simple word game, math puzzle ala Project Euler, all written in idiomatic Go.
6 years ago
Go

John Todd wrote:

That's why I think there has to be some sort of killer app/demo if Clojure indeed wants to be more of a general language.


So Java, Ruby and Python aren't general programming languages?
Killer demo isn't a requirement to success, what was the killer demo of Python when it was released?



I imagine "general" here meant "popular", not "for general purposes".
7 years ago

Sean Corfield wrote: I will encourage folks to watch this wonderful talk by Temple Grandin at TED: http://www.ted.com/talks/temple_grandin_the_world_needs_all_kinds_of_minds.html




Thank you. The best thing I've seen or heard in some time.
7 years ago
I came accros this account of Fritz Kunze conference talk: http://lispy.wordpress.com/2008/10/23/lisp50-notes-part-iv-fritz-kunz-enters-the-lisp-mine-field/

"he then delved into the link between aspergers, autism, emotional immaturity and programming ability. He had a slide outlining some personality traits and a collective hush fell over the room as we all realized that we were part of some sort of incomprehensible evolutionary programmer-genius phenomenon. Okay, okay… I’m exaggerating. But the slide was interesting: it included stuff like “uncomfortable at parties” and “dislikes travelling”. (Are you a misunderstood genius? Take this quiz!) He talked about some of the problems in managing Lisp guys: “There’s a limit to the number of smart people you can put in a room. Things will break down and they won’t talk to each other.” After some more anecdotes and also some unscientific speculations, he concluded that therapy was the only solution… therapy, that is, for the normal people that have to work with the “asperger” guys! After a while, the managers and salesmen begin to emulate the smart people, he explained. If the company culture as whole absorbs too many “aspergerisms”, then the business ceases to be able to talk to its customers!"

How common is this "Lisp profile" among Clojure programmers?

Regards,
Igor
7 years ago

Dan King wrote:does it make to start my learning with Clojure or some other 'functional' language?


Yes!
There is a wealth of freely available high quality lispy and functional learning materials online, you might really like one of them.
http://learnyouahaskell.com/ is fun, and there are other sources available from haskell.org
For something more academic, I just discovered http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/matthias/HtDP2e/
7 years ago