Mike Gage

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since Jan 22, 2002
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Recent posts by Mike Gage

Interesting answers. I had once spent time learning the basics of Scala and found it interesting, but I never really used it in a useful way. I am just picking up Groovy now. It seems that it is somewhat like F# in the .NET world, in that you can write functional or object-oriented code or both.

Your answers are leading me toward putting Clojure on the list of languages to learn.

Thank you for your responses.
8 years ago
Is there an advantage to using Clojure rather than Groovy?
8 years ago
Thank you!
8 years ago
I am trying to get an understanding of what all Hadoop encompasses. It appears to have features useful for dealing with data. My question is whether Hadoop functionality includes dealing with semantics. In other words dealing with potentially equivalent or related data.

Thank you,

Mike
8 years ago
Is there any aspect of Hadoop that involves semantics?

Thank you,

Mike Gage
8 years ago
I have become accustomed to working with Maven. Our company is now widely adopting Gradle in place of Maven. One of the features I enjoy in Maven is dependency management in a parent project to control dependency versions in subprojects. I am sure that there is an equivalent mechanism in Gradle. What is the preferred way to do that?

Thank you,

Mike Gage
8 years ago
It looks to me like RMI is the easiest way to implement the solution as it is posed in the assignment. Since we are not an all-Java company, we haven't used RMI, so I guess this is my opportunity to learn it.
My understanding, from what I have read, is that the normal way to implement an RMI solution is to have a web server deliver classes to the clients so that they can implement the server methods. Alternatively, the client can have the server classes in its own classpath. Many of the examples I have seen take this approach, apparently for the sake of simplicity, but add a comment to the effect that normally a web server would be used.
It seems like a web server is a better solution, since it allows changes on the server without making changes at all of the clients (and apparently vice-versa). Is it acceptable to include a web server, such as Tomcat, as a part of the solution? Is this what they expect?
Thanks.
-Mike Gage