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Nathan Ward

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since Jan 21, 2012
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Recent posts by Nathan Ward

Any particular reason that Internationalization is not addressed in the book? Looks like the support for Internationalization has changed significantly in Angular 2. I've just skimmed the docs about it for Angular 2 on the Angular site. There must be a good reason for the changes to it. It was quite easy to use in AngularJS. Now, the Angular website says "You need to build and deploy a separate version of the application for each supported language." That was not necessary in Angular 1, but there must be a good reason for this. I believe that the Angular 1 Translate module was not provided by the Angular team.

Thanks,

Nathan
My company has standardized the scrum process and tools throughout the company including things like the start and end date of each sprint so that all iterations for all scrum teams start and end at the same time. Although they don't always share the metrics with us, it is my understanding that management looks at various metrics that they collect. It seems to me that some metrics are reasonable and some are pretty crazy. I think that comparing team velocity across scrum teams doesn't make much sense since each team calibrates their points a little different. Of course, the company has some general guidelines for small, medium, and large stories (3, 5, and 8 points), but I don't think the sizing of stories can be standardized enough to make cross team comparisons useful. However, process metrics, such as the number of stories planned vs completed per sprint seem to make some sense to me. However, this seems to encourage us on the scrum teams to plan very conservatively. Since we know that management is looking at this, we do not commit to more that we are absolutely sure we can complete in each sprint. This results in us always completing our stories for the sprint early. We then start work on stuff for the next sprint or whatever we think is useful. Maybe that is the way it should work or is not?

Nathan
Online code review tools, such as Crucible, make code reviews much more convenient than they used to be and more efficient but still effective, IMO. I think online code review tools are a must have. Github includes an online code review capability that makes it pretty easy to comment on code when a pull request is submitted. However, Crucible still seems more effective to me, but maybe it is just what I'm used to.