Muriel Boutefeu

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since Mar 05, 2002
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Recent posts by Muriel Boutefeu

I'm studying for Test 296 - MQ Solution DESIGNER.
Some topics overlap with 297. If we can help each other...
Has someone already started to prepare for this certification?
I wonder what is the best way to prepare.
Is this certification similar to the one of IBM ?
In the document explaining the coverage, OMG refers to UML 2.0. Specification.
But where is this document I only found version 1.5.
The only test in UML is the one from IBM: test 486- Object Oriented Analysis and Development with UML.
It is a challenging test.
What is nice is that it's a test which is part of a certification path to be IBM certified Entreprise Developer or BEA Entreprise Developer.
See
  • IBM test 486 - Objectifs
  • JCert - Entreprise Developer
  • IBM Certified Entreprise Developer
  • My recommendations
  • Otherwise I've heard that W3C would like to set up its own certification test. Wait and see.
    Same level of difficulty.
    Congratulation if you succeed the ICE test in the first attempt.
    Be sur you understand which answers were wrong and why.
    Have a look to ObjectbyDesign forum. There's plenty discussion about the ICE question on the IBM test on UML and OO.
    The only forum who does as well as JavaRanch (but only for one test)
    Websphere test 158 contains about 70% questions on JSP, EJB, ... and only 30% questions on WebSphere itself. So it's possible to pass the test without knowing the product.
    JSP, servlet, ...
    If you pass SCWCD, you should already know quite well servlet and JSP specifications.
    EJB
    If you have already some knowledge of EJB, I would recommand you put the focus on the first book in IBM education resources:

    Enterprise JavaBeans, 3rd Edition
    By Richard Monson-Haefel
    Publication Order Number: Published by O'Reilly & Associates; ISBN: 0596002262
    Note: Read a thorough explanation of the EJB 1.1 specification, as well as designing and programming EJBs.


    It's a nice book giving first good explanation on the why and then only details of code. For the certification 158, you don't really need details of code. 158 is only on EJB 1.1 and this book contains description of both 1.1 and 2.0. But the separation between the 2 is well marked in the book and you will have only to read half of the book for this current certification. Read it twice.
    You must know perfectly:
  • difference between EJB (stateful session, stateless session, container managed
  • transaction management by container, isolation level, types (mandatory, RequiresNew,...). You will have some scenario questions on this)
  • transaction management programmaticaly. When you can use it.(on which type of bean)
  • LifeCycle of beans
  • how to write the Deployment Descriptor for the different types of beans and the different types of transaction management + some question on JNDI resources


  • Now if you don't have any understanding of J2EE yet, it would be better to start with the book of Marinescu (another IBM education resources but for test 483 - J2EE 1.2):

    EJB Design Patterns
    By Floyd Marinescu
    Publisher: John Wiley
    ISBN: 0471208310
    or
    Download the pdf version of the book from (You may have to register to download): TheServerSide.com
    (http://www2.theserverside.com/
    books/EJBDesignPatterns/index.jsp)


    Websphere And then, for Websphere questions, I recommand posts of other ranchers:
  • Recommendations from Axel Janssen
  • Wee T

  • ICE
    And of course don't forget to understand the answers of ICE test posted on this forum:
    ICE questions and answers
    340: Thursday 3rd April evening (about 10:00 GMT)
    285: Friday 4
    287: Tuesday 8
    Still have received only 340.
    But it's already nice.
    11) Which of the following statements accurately describe the J2EE architecture? (3)
    A. Web components provide presentation logic that works well with anonymous clients over the Internet.
    B. EJBs provide business logic within the context of transactions and persistence.
    C. Web components access EJBs through the same APIs as application clients.
    D. Application servers provide the infrastructure for the J2EE architecture.
    Why is C wrong ?
    Did 285, 287 and 340.
    Received 340.
    By the way, could we share the answers ?
    You can find answers in another JavaRanch Forum:
    Topic: J2EE Recommended Reading
    But the number of correct answers has changed.
    So with the following answers you get 25 correct answers out of 27.
    Who could find the 2 wrong (Probably answer 1 and then ...?)
    The answers:
    1. C ??
    2. ABC
    3. BC
    4. A
    5. CD
    6. BD
    7. C
    8. D
    9. CD
    10. AB
    11. ABC
    12. ACD
    13. BC
    14. ACDE
    15. AD
    16. ABC
    17. C
    18. BD
    19. C
    20. B
    21. C
    22. AD
    23. ABC
    24. ACD
    25. ACD
    26. C
    27. BC
    Define getter and setter in your interface.
    Use any instance attribute in your class.
    getter and setter are public.
    attribute should be private.
    interface IBase {
    void m();
    void setDesc(String desc);
    String getDesc();
    }
    class X implements IBase {
    private String desc;
    public void setDesc(String desc){
    this.desc = desc;
    }
    public String getDesc() {
    return desc;
    }
    public void m() {
    System.out.println("X. " + getDesc());
    }
    }
    class Y implements IBase {
    private String description;
    public void setDesc(String desc){
    description = "Description: " + desc;
    }
    public String getDesc() {
    return description;
    }
    public void m() {
    System.out.println("Y. "+getDesc());
    }
    }
    class Test1 {
    static void amethod(IBase obj) {
    obj.setDesc("sometext");
    obj.m();
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
    X x = new X();
    Y y = new Y();
    amethod(x);
    amethod(y);
    }
    }
    There are some good books. It depends what you are looking for.
    You can start with:

    Applying UML and Patterns - An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and the Unified Process


    It's a starter book for iterative development in OO: Project Scope, Analysis, Design, Coding.
    Its main emphasis is on OO Design:
    -What is the magic to find the right classes with adequate responsabilities ?
    -How to make your classes with high-cohesin and low-coupling ?
    -How to make your architecture protected against variations?
    Craig does not only give the right definition of good OO Design but he explains how the brains of an OO expert reaches a solution.
    To explain that, Craig gives some very simple Design Patterns (Information Expert, Creator, Controller, Polymorphism, Indirection, Pure Fabrication,...). These Patterns are really easy to understand by a beginner. Whith them you can really start constructing quite good OO Design.
    After that, Craig explains some more well-known Patterns like Adaptor, Singleton, Facade, Observer...
    The second version of this books also uses the Unified Process: the book is organised with the first two UP phases (Creation, Elaboration ) and multiple iterations. This gives the reader a good feeling of the iterative process and on when to do each activity.
    Tell me what is your experience and which job you want to perform for other books recommendations.
    'Functionnal' analyst, OO programmer ? Which Programing language do you use ?
    fixed accidental HTML probs in image tag
    [ October 13, 2002: Message edited by: Frank Carver ]
    Manas,
    Creation
    1. You list your Use Case Name
    2. Your write some text scenario for the main Use Cases
    3. You draw a UML Use Case Diagram
    Elaboration. In each iteration:
    4. Your write text scenarii for almost all Use Cases
    5. And in the same time you discover the conceptual data. You model them in a UML Class Diagram (no operation in classes at this step)
    6. You can also write System Sequence Diagrams. These are main scenarii between Actors and [/B]System[/B]. You use UML Sequence Diagram
    7. You refine your UML Use Case Diagram
    Then you apply Design Patterns to simultaneously
    8. Draw the interaction diagrams (either an UML Sequence Diagram or an UML Collaboration Diagram. An interaction diagram show how objects collaborate to fulffill one scenario.
    9. Simultaneously you find Software classes and you create a new UML Use Case Diagram(this time with operations in classes )
    10. You group your classes and collaborations diagrams in Packages(
    11.To explain the architecture of your System, you draw an UML Package Diagram
    12. Draw UML Deployment Diagram
    Construction. In each iteration:
    12. Refine the text and diagrams as needed.
    Last attempt:
    It seems that you cannot nest UBB code.
    So what is missing in my previous Reply is:
    1. If you have to define your shared library then it is in your system. You can model it as a UML
    subsystem
    2. If your shared library has already been defined then you can consider it as external to your system and so is an actor. In UML either you drawn an actor and add the stereotype system
    or you draw a box and add the stereotype actor
    in the CHARACTERISTIC INFORMATION of your Use Case:
    Scope: what system is being considered black-box under design
    It seems that you cannot nest UBB code.
    So what is missing in my previous Reply is:
    1. If you have to define your shared library then it is in your system. You can model it as a UML
    <<subsystem>>
    2. If your shared library has already been defined then you can consider it as external to your system and so is an actor. In UML either you drawn an actor and add the stereotype <<system>>
    or you draw a box and add the stereotype <<actor>>
    in the CHARACTERISTIC INFORMATION of your Use Case:
    Scope: <what system is being considered black-box under design>
    Remark for Frank:

    An "actor" is typically some entity which initiates a process or use case.


    This is not the definition of an Actor.
    An Actor can be:
  • A Primary Actor. It has user goals fulfilled through using services of the System.
  • A Secondary Actoror Supporting Actor provides a service to the System. Often it is another computer system but it could also be a person.
  • Often the Primary Actor initiates the Use Case but it is not always the case.

    Now to answer to Tara, my opinion is this one:
    [list]1. If you have to define your shared library then it is in your system. You can model it as a UML [B][/B].[/list][list]2. If your shared library has already been defined then you can consider it as external to your system and so is an actor. In UML either you drawn an actor and add the stereotype [B][/B] or you draw a box and add the stereotype [B][/B].[/list]
    What you can do also is first define your shared library. And then use it as an external actor. In this case you change the border of your system and it becomes mandatory to precise in what is your system when you write your Use Case.
    If you use Cockburn template (http://members.aol.com/acockburn/papers/uctempla.htm then you have a Scope element in the CHARACTERISTIC INFORMATION of your Use Case:
    Scope: <what system is being considered black-box under design>
    So
  • 1. when you first define your shared library:

  • Scope: shared library YourSharedLibraryName
  • 2. And then when you use it as an Actor:

  • Scope: system YourSystemName