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Josh Fox

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since Apr 16, 2013
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Recent posts by Josh Fox

Building Web Reputation Systems by Randy Farmer and Bryce Glass is a fascinating book on the topic. One important point is that reputations are not portable. Your reputation on one site means little on another. But on the other hand, each reputation does say something about who you are.
7 years ago
I'm here to answer your questions, but now I'd like to ask one of my own.

Folks who've contributed to CodeRanch get a Saloon Title like "Bartender" or Sheriff."

Good developers are hard to find, and a title at CodeRanch shows that you contribute to the community and enjoy improving your professional skills. Employers like that.

Do you find that the Saloon Title helps you get a better job? Do you employers contact you on the basis of your title? Or does the Saloon Title help you in some other way?

I could ask the same about karma/reputation at other sites, though mostly I'm asking about CodeRanch.

7 years ago

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:While I'm not looking for a job, I clicked on the form to see what info you ask for. The promo got me curious.

I like that job seekers can list skills without it being a long drawn out process..



Jeanne, glad you like the form. Yes, we built it for people who have the "Itch" to find a new job.

For those who don't know whether they have the Itch, I suggest our fun quiz on the FiveYearItch homepage. It asks some offbeat questions to help you figure out whether you're sitting pretty or going crazy in your current job.
7 years ago

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I like that job seekers can list skills without it being a long drawn out process. Which question do you think is most interesting on the sign up form?



Jeanne, excellent question. I'd love to learn what CodeRanchers think.

From my perspective, the most important field is the "dream job" requirements, in which developers say what the minimum an employer has to offer them in order to contact them -- interesting work, higher salary, whatever.

Most good developers are already employed. They don't need a new job. But they'll move for a dream job.

Employers know that they should only bother reaching out to the developer if they can offer what he or she demands. (At the same time, developers don't as for too much, because they do want to get offers.)
7 years ago

arulk pillai wrote:... Your blog posts will provide inspiration for your next book...


The point here is that no one knows how good your work is except your boss, who has no incentive to give you a better deal -- unless other employers know about your amazing skills!

If you can write a bunch of blog posts, great! You've positioned yourself at the top of the software engineering profession.

But for those who have not get got started with writing, I'd suggest CodeRanch discussions, answering questions at StackOverlow, and writing some blog posts.


And of course, there's FiveYearItch
7 years ago

Bear Bibeault wrote:Or write a few books.



Bear,

Absolutely, writing a book is a great idea.

But there are a lot of skilled, focused software engineers who are not natural writers; or who would prefer to focus on software development; or who don't have the time for that.

Employers still want to hire them, even to poach them. The question is ... how do employers find them?
7 years ago

Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Posting here ... lets you show off your tech knowledge. ... Supplementing that with some technical answers gets the first page on google to be proof you know your stuff.



Jeanne, quite right. CodeRanch forum discussions have the advantage of letting you show technical knowledge in depth. That lets you write more freely than just answering a specific question on StackOverflow, but with less effort than a full-fledged blog post.

It also gives you the advantage of more Google-juice than your own blog would, particularly if you're not planning to write a lot.
7 years ago
Bill,

Bill Clar wrote:I watched your intro video and I felt like it was speaking to me directly.


Good to hear that we're not the only ones thinking this way.

Bill Clar wrote:I've got the 10 year itch at my soulless job.


I'd say: "Run away, run away, escape whle you still can!", except I don't want to be too dramatic

Interest in FiveYearItch is strong and the number of employers and developers is growing every day. We were excited to see it go so well in our beta. Some featured companies listed at the FiveYearItch "About" page.
7 years ago
Bill, interest in FiveYearItch is strong and the number of employers and developers is growing every day. We were excited to see it go so well in our beta. Some featured companies listed at the FiveYearItch "About" page.
7 years ago
Yup, they don't know you so long as you stay in hiding

So, your options are:
1. Go ahead and write some blog posts, articles, open-source, StackOverflow answers.
2. Let some recruiters know you're interested. The market for devs is scarce now, they want you.
3. On your LinkedIn profile (I hope you have one), check the radio button stating your interest in getting offers.
4. Tell your friends and colleagues that you are looking.
5. Join some Users Groups in the area. Really join -- attend several meetings, not just one. People will get to know you. All in all, I think that "networking" is not all its cracked up to be for us developers, but a surprising number of jobs come from some very brief acquaintances.
6. And of course, sign up for my FiveYearItch. That's what we're here for!
7 years ago

Jon Berg wrote:Josh, I've been thinking about this for a while....
Suggestions?



Jon,

Yes, exactly! This is precisely what FiveYearitch was built to solve.

You need to let employers know of your experience, your skills, and your willingness to learn and to find new challenges. They appreciate that, but they don't know how to find you.

We made FiveYearitch anonymous so that you don't look desperate -- because you aren't, you have a comfortable job. This makes you into a more desirable candidate.

Of course, I may be biased towards FiveYearItch, so I should mention alternatives. The top alternative for finding a new job while not searching actively is a skilled recruiter who will devote time to finding you just the match you need -- and there are some such recruiters out there.
7 years ago

Astha Sharma wrote:Hi Josh,
-- I have good command on core java and have experience of developing Java web services for my Android projects. If I want to switch as Java developer, is it must to have knowledge of java frameworks to get good opportunity as 1 year experienced Java developer?



Astha, knowing frameworks is good, but the important thing is to prove your expertise. How about contributing open-source, writing a blog, or getting a certification? At more senior levels, knowing frameworks is not importnat -- it is expected that you can learn new ones fast. But still, you need to find ways to prove your abilities.

Astha Sharma wrote:Hi Josh,
-- I have worked in another company for first 6 months of my job. Now I am planning to leave my current company after working here for 6 months. Will switching companies in such less period effect opportunities for me for getting job even if I have valid reasons of leaving both the jobs?



Yes, job-hopping too frequently doesn't look good. If you're good enough, you can always find a new job, and you don't want to stay in a hellhole. But you don't want to look flakey.

How often do people change jobs in your industry? In the US, a rule of thumb is to work in one place for two years, with three years as an optimum. After five years, you start to look stale (which is where the FiveYearItch name comes from.
7 years ago
Hey, CodeRanchers, thanks for the warm welcome.

If you're comfortably-employed and would like something better -- new challenges, work-life balance, kegerator, whatever ...

If you're tired of CRUD and dreaming of switching to Rails, Node.js or whatever new technology that turns you ...

If you want to learn how far employers will go to hire you ...

... we're here to make that happen.

Check out FiveYearItch and the FiveYearItch blog for more ideas.

Since this is a welcome thread, let's take the discussion to another thread, which I have opened here.
7 years ago
Hey, CodeRanchers, thanks for the warm welcome.

If you're comfortably-employed and would like something better -- new challenges, work-life balance, kegerator, whatever ...

If you're tired of CRUD and dreaming of switching to Rails, Node.js or whatever new technology that turns you ...

If you want to learn how far employers will go to hire you ...

... we're here to make that happen.

Check out FiveYearItch and the FiveYearItch blog for more ideas.

Looking forward to a great discussion!
7 years ago


Tell us what you want in a job. You only get offers that meet your requirements. You, the skilled software engineer, are in charge.

No recruiter spam. With FiveYearItch, technical personnel hire other technical personnel. We introduce you, anonymously, and provide a trimmed-down communication workflow that lets each side know just what they need.

FiveYearItch supports software developers in the US, Australia, Canada, and the UK.

And don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.
7 years ago