Tim Murphy

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since Apr 11, 2002
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Recent posts by Tim Murphy

I think the SCWCD Study Kit that Javaranch sent me was most definitely the best book for my study.
Thanks for the help Javaranch
17 years ago
John, I'm taking it tomorrow actually. That SCWCD Study Kit book has been a big help.
Question ID :1021099602992 on JWebPlus from the SCWCD Exam Study Kit:
Which element under the <tag> element in the TLD specifies the type of body that a custom tag expects?
I answered
but the correct answer was .
When I have used custom tags before I have used .
What would be the correct answer if a similar question came up in the official Sun exam?
Thanks that was exactly what I was looking for
With the Programmer Certification there was a strict list of requires needed to pass the exam. Is there a similar list for the Web Component Developer exam?
I'd like to thank all the people who helped me with my queries relating to the Java 2 Programmers exam.
18 years ago
I just tried this:

And it compiled and run without exception ??? I though thi swasn't allowed ???
also Vinita, the output is defabc, which seems to mean it is 'First In Last Out'
Hashing uses the String, in this example "abc" and "def" as unqiue identifies. When a String comes along that is the same as a previously added String, it replaces the old String. Therefore in your HashSet you add the two objects, then you replace them with the same objects again.
Brent how do you know that?
It's an Interface.
You can refer to the online API documentation at:
http://java.sun.com/products/jdk/1.2/docs/api/java/util/Collection.html
Hello Tina,
answers a and c create new instances of 'a' and pass it in to Thread as an arguenment. answer b does not create a new instance. The constructor for the Threads used in the original code is: Thread(Runnable a)
When the interrupt() method is called on a Thread it enters the ready state. When it resumes running it will throw an InterruptedException. Thus in Brent's example the exception is caught and t is set to true, therefore ending the run method.
Thanks Brent,
Were I went wrong was thinking 3.5-6 = -3.5, doh.
And then I though rounding -3.5 made -4.0, but it doesn't! This is important it would equal -3.0