Rogers Cadenhead

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Recent posts by Rogers Cadenhead

Does that mean I'm no longer a legend? :-)
6 years ago
I prefer Java over .Net because I do coding on a variety of platforms -- Windows desktop, Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP web server, Android phone and Mac multimedia desktop -- and I want to be able to write code for all of them. Since Java became my programming language of choice I never looked very seriously at the Windows-heavy development options.

In the early days of Java it didn't do a great job of presenting user interfaces on Windows that were competitive with what you could do using Microsoft's programming tools. It was always obvious you were running something written in Java.

But I don't think that's the case any more.
6 years ago
I love hearing about kids learning Java. I was around 12 when I began coding on a Timex Sinclair 1000 in the '70s.

There's a special edition of my book coming out exclusively at Barnes & Noble in two weeks that has a bonus chapter on using Java to create Minecraft mods. The release date is May 27.
6 years ago
The publisher offers the book in several ebook formats and it may be available as part of an O'Reilly Safari subscription, but there are no plans to put the whole thing online outside of that.
6 years ago
My book would be good for someone who didn't get too far into the basics of Java programming and wants a refresher on that *plus* some coverage of more advanced topics.

The next book to read depends on what kind of Java programming you most want to do. If you're interested in creating Android apps, I recommend the new edition of Sams Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 Hours that came out in October. (ISBN 0-672-33444-5.)

My book doesn't cover JavaFX. I'd like to cover it but haven't found room for both it and Swing yet. I may be able to get it in the next edition of Java in 21 Days, which I'm about to start work on.
6 years ago
This book has no prerequisites. The goal is to help people with no programming experience and people who have some experience and want to get up to speed with Java pretty quickly.

To make it easier, the book uses the free NetBeans integrated development environment in the development of each hour's programs (though other tools can be used as well). I think NetBeans is the easiest programming tool to learn the language on, especially since the user interface has stayed the same for a long time.
6 years ago
The book's chapter on JAX-WS covers how to create a client and all the components of a server -- the server interface, service implementation bean, and service publisher. There's also an activity where the reader creates a simple weather reporting web service.

The XML covered is an examination of WSDL files.

As for the JVM, the book doesn't get under the hood. It's a bit beyond the scope of a beginner's book.
6 years ago
If you feel like you're past the beginner's stage of Java, a lot of the book would cover the same ground, but there's one notable exception: Closures are a killer new feature you wouldn't have learned about in Java 6. Programmers have been asking for this feature for a long time.

I am writing another book to come out later this year that gets further into advanced topics, Sams Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days. As for others, I like what Bruce Eckel does in Thinking in Java and I'm a huge fan of Elliotte Rusty Harold, but I'm not aware of either doing a new book specifically for Java 8. Harold's Java Network Programming came out last fall and is sitting on my desk begging to be read.
6 years ago
The book teaches by example. I'm a big believer in lots of simple code examples (and making sure they all compile!).

There's an interesting essay by Peter Norvig that says it takes 10 years to teach yourself a programming language:

http://norvig.com/21-days.html

I think more highly than he does of the Teach Yourself X in 24 Hours (or 21 Days) concept, naturally, but there's a concept in his essay that I've used to motivate my kids. It's the idea that it takes 10,000 hours of practice and effort to be great at something. I told my kids they'll never have more time to become great at something than when they are in their teens. My oldest son is devoting himself to becoming an animator. When I was his age I was writing software (mostly BBSes) on my Commodore 64.

The goal of the 24 Hours book is to leave no beginners behind. A reader who spends 24 one-hour sessions with the book will progress through the fundamentals of the language by creating working programs and writing some of their own.

6 years ago
I've covered them in past editions of Sams Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days, but haven't found room in the 24 Hours book.

The advanced material covered includes Swing (four chapters), JAX-WS, Java2D graphics, Android apps, data structures, reading and writing files and the biggest new addition to the book, a chapter that covers closures.

What about servlets and JSP has your interest? I used to run websites with them, but gravitated towards PHP (in a LAMP environment) because deployment was easier and LAMP uptime is so great.
6 years ago
I added a double-length chapter on Android to the book because so many people are learning Java specifically to create apps. I wanted to give readers an introduction to app development that's compatible with Sams Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 Hours, which has a new edition that came out last fall.

Java 8 itself doesn't change much in regard to Android, but Android itself has been enhanced since the previous edition of my book.
6 years ago
Hello, jolly ranchers!

I just finished this book and it comes out in around two weeks. I am prepared to discuss Java 8, World Cup soccer and news stories that begin with the words "Florida Man."
6 years ago