Fergus Flanagan

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since Jul 13, 2015
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Recent posts by Fergus Flanagan

Getting The value of the local variable line is not used for "line". No idea what I'm doing wrong here??

4 years ago
Not that this will help you much but I'm wanting to do Android development too and I'm using the resources at Cave of Programming to learn java basics, the course is based on Java 6. I've used other resources that teach Java 8 but found them lacking esp for a real beginner like me. But the COP Java is so well taught and down to earth I will worry about catching up with the new developments after I've grasped the ideas. There is of course the Java resources at Oracle which I'm referencing in parallel.

My advice from a beginner for what it's worth is to use the most digestible material and then worry about picking up the updates later.
4 years ago

Paul Clements wrote:

Fergus Flanagan wrote:I've never used OO languages at the coal face and TBH never had a proper understanding of the methodologies around OO. Which is why I'm now finding Java a tough challenge.


If you spend time hammering home the basic constructs i.e. Classes, Objects, Inheritance, Polymorphism etc with loads of clear/fuss free examples then you should get it eventually. The worst thing you can do is plough on without a sound grasp of a language's building blocks i.e. focus on semantics not the minutiae of syntax.

Even though it's far from perfect, I would thoroughly recommend Head First Java as a great intro. Explains the basics very well.



I'm using a combination of HFJ and the Oracle Java resource.

I did start out with a video tutorial course on Udemy by Tim Buchalka but was put off by the challenges being obtuse, I don't mind challenging but when you don't even understand the question!!

Also tried Thinking In Java but found myself getting bogged down in minutiae. Excellent resource though and very insightful but maybe something I could come back to a year down the line.
4 years ago

Paul Clements wrote:My experience of a few weeks on this forum as that there are essentially two distinct groups of "newbies" on here:

  • Experienced IT professionals (i.e. multiyear experience of the entire project life-cycle, including coding/development, testing, deployment, maintenance etc)
  • People new not only to Java but new to programming and a formal IT career

  • I count myself in the first group. As such I have zero anxieties about actually learning Java. My underlying worry is getting taken seriously due to age and lack of commercial Java experience. However, I am determined to give it a year and see what happens.

    Personally I think to be part of the second group must be difficult. IT is a trade/skill - I'm not sure some people realise that. You don't just become a programmer. You need to have a logical, problem-solving mind which is capable of breaking things down into component parts. You also need patience and determination. Giving up on a problem isn't an option if you want to succeed in IT. People will be relying on you to come up with a fix. In short, it's not a job for either the faint or half-hearted.

    All the best,

    PaulC.




    Excellent post Paul


    My underlying worry is getting taken seriously due to age and lack of commercial Java experience.


    Same here I'm 51 and hoping to re-enter the IT sector after many years doing non-IT work. I'll be starting at the bottom, that's if someone will give me a chance. IT teams are generally made up of developers in their 20s & 30s so trying to fit in will be another challenge. One wonders where do all the twenty something developers from the eighties go, they can't all be or even want to be promoted up the management ladder. Is the IT sector ageist?


    You also need patience and determination. Giving up on a problem isn't an option if you want to succeed in IT. People will be relying on you to come up with a fix. In short, it's not a job for either the faint or half-hearted



    That is so true, many late nights eating crap food and drinking coffee to stay awake!! My only saving grace is the fact I'm genuinely interested in technology and unlike others who are in the sector one comes across I'm developing my skills not just to get a pay cheque but because I like technology and making things work well for users. Though with the financial pressures and time constraints imposed on projects the idea of quality being a factor in the end product is rare. Either that or the developers are not skilled enough.
    4 years ago

    William Barnes wrote:Everyone is different.  If someone finds Java easy, and they post that, that is their opinion.  How many different languages have you used?  

    > I don't believe there are any easy languages especially if you want to be a good developer.
    That is a bit of a strange statement.



    I done a bit of Assembly, Pascal, C, C++, PL/SQL, SQL, HTML. None were taken to a level where I would consider myself skilled (novice level). I've never used OO languages at the coal face and TBH never had a proper understanding of the methodologies around OO. Which is why I'm now finding Java a tough challenge. If you are a skilled developer esp in other OO languages then sure yes Java is going to be so much easier. But I think for any newbie to OO or just programming it's no cake walk and will be very tough unless you are a fast learner.
    4 years ago
    Okay got it sorted beginning to understand how Eclipse organises it's classes and libraries.

    I hadn't linked my linked my project with the projects I'd built (for the TIJ code) using the above very helpful link.

    Henry Wong wrote:
    Well, it kinda varies with version to version, but for the most part ... it is ...

    Right click (project) --> properties --> Java Build Path --> Libraries --> Add external Jars ... if you want to add a jar archive to the build. And, at the same submenu, add class folder, if you want to add a directory of class files to the build.

    Henry



    TBH I'm following blindly. I think what I'll do is have another go hopefully this week, but will go through it with you folks step by step so I know what it is I'm doing and maybe track down what I did wrong last time.

    thanks

    Knute Snortum wrote:Tell us what you tried and how it failed.



    Oh dear wish you hadn't asked that. I followed the instructions through to the end and after completing step 3 I still had errors so I ended up deleting everything I'd done. As those instructions were 6 years old and Eclipse has obviously gone through many changes since.

    I was hoping there would have been more formal instructions somewhere.
    Bruce has his own libraries which I'd like to use as I work through his book TIJ 4th ed.

    The problem is I was hoping to use the latest eclipse IDE instead of something like Notepad++ and the console. I've no idea how to implement his code so it will work within the Eclipse IDE and I've tried this but failed to get it to work.

    Would appreciate any help or suggestions.

    Campbell Ritchie wrote:You will also find that the 2nd edition of Bruce Eckels's book is now horribly out of date. The most recent edition is the 4th, which covers the new features of Java5. Probably still worth reading, though.



    Yes have downloaded it and may go through it. Pity Bruce didn't keep updating it as it was so successful.
    5 years ago

    Junilu Lacar wrote:

    Fergus Flanagan wrote:
    Am I too late to join?  


    Considering that this thread is from 15 years ago and that Yahoo group no longer appears to exist, I would think that, yes, you are a little late to that party.

    On the bright side, there are a lot of people around here who are happy to help.



    I guess better late than never just isn't always true  

    Hell when I saw this post earlier on today I was really curious to see if that group existed. I wonder how successful it ended up being.
    5 years ago

    Joseph Russell wrote:Hey if your interested a group of us are studying Bruce Eckels book together online. Currently our schedule is to read and discuss one chapter one week and then do & discuss the chapter's excercises the next week. We also post our solutions to get more out of what were learning.
    Here is the URL ---> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JavaThink
    Currently were doing the Ch2 exercises and will begin Ch3 Monday April 2nd.
    Anyone is welcome to join.
    Joe



    Am I too late to join?  
    5 years ago
    Saw this video yesterday and it really helped me to realise there are a lot of people in the same boat especially when it comes to being a new developer. I think for new budding developers it's important to watch this as for most of use this is a solo journey and we don't have mentors on hand. I am finding learning to code in Java a very real and often difficult challenge and I'm so angry at the people out there who I'd read on the web previously saying Java was an easy language to learn. It most certainly isn't and I don't believe there are any easy languages especially if you want to be a good developer. Let's dispel this myth of the easy language it doesn't do anyone any favours and will just heighten peoples insecurities when they hit the many brick walls one encounters when learning to program in that first language. But I know from experience if I stick at it, it will reward, so hanging on in there is the game plan

    Anyway here is the link...Becoming a developer, the good, the bad and the ugly

    Hope you find it as helpful as I did.


    PS. due to a technical issue they had during recording you will have to turn up the volume to max for the first 5 minutes.
    5 years ago
    The last few days I've covered static/non-static inner classes, anonymous classes and abstract classes and tbh everything is feeling abstract right now. I have a feeling I'll only truly understand this stuff when i've been coding properly for a fair bit. Now it's all just theory so forgive me if I'm a bit woolly in my understanding.


    I presume you have read the Java™ Tutorials about nested classes.



    Found it very dry so chose to do online video tutorials. But will have to start referring to it eventually I know but just easing into it at the moment.

    Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel;


    [Moderation comment] Link has been removed

    Incidentally is this still a worthwhile read considering we are on Java8?

    You will see that inner classes shou‍ld always be instance members of their surrounding type,


    Well that's the text book definition of what an inner class is, right?

    You will see that inner classes shou‍ld always be instance members of their surrounding type, so they only exist as part of an instance,


    May be I not understanding what you are saying here. But are you saying an inner class can be instantiated within the class it's been declared in or equally outside of the class it's been declared in since in either case it's existing only because the outer class instance exists?
    5 years ago
    I'm speaking about non-static classes here not static.
    5 years ago