J. Yan

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Recent posts by J. Yan

High productivity doesn�t always mean a good thing.

1.) For a country with huge population like China, it is causing some troubles:
China Loses More Manufacturing Jobs Than the U.S., Survey Says

"China is losing more manufacturing jobs than the U.S as productivity surges in the world's most populous nation, according to a study by the Conference Board."

2.) If you are a high productivity programmer, you might be partly blamed for your co-workers' layoff.

Hope nobody will get offended this time
[ July 10, 2004: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago
However, personally I don't believe that US is No. 1 and China is No. 2 (or whatever) in term of productivity.
16 years ago
"Manufacturing productivity in China is nearly a fifth higher than that of leading European countries and almost as high as in the US, according to an unpublished study by the McKinsey management consultancy."


http://search.ft.com/search/article.html?id=040617001277&query=China&vsc_appId=totalSearch&state=Form
16 years ago
Are they a software vender or supplier?
My 2 cents:
Specifications are used to describe software, languages, or protocols. For example, there are CORBA, UML, and HTTP etc specifications. Their implementations are produced by software vendors or suppliers.
Sure, everyone knows HTML and HTTP. However, if the company wants to hire you to develop their own browser, they might hope you know HTML and HTTP specifications very well.
Again, it's just my 2 cents.
[ January 30, 2004: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago

Originally posted by Matt Cao:

When everyone else take hours to solve a specific problem, you need only needed minutes.


How many employers/managers out there really care about this? Please name a few. I will sure send my resume to them
Thanks!
16 years ago
How about let's look at the broader picture? And then make the judgment yourself.
Below are the data I got from http://www.x-rates.com/
1990: 1 US Dollar = 4.73 Chinese Yuan = 16.96 Indian Rupee
2004: 1 US Dollar = 8.28 Chinese Yuan = 45.68 Indian Rupee
[ January 14, 2004: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago

Originally posted by John Summers:

does stuff like mobile phones and software really cost the same in China?


Mobile phones used to (10 years ago) be very expensive, especially when compared with the average Chinese's salary. The one time cost (phone plus activation fee etc) was about Yuan 10000.00 (1 USD = 8.28 Yuan ??? at that time), and the service fees were even more horrible (many people complained that they could afford buying a mobile phone, but could not afford using it). 10 years ago, owning a mobile phone (the old fashion big Motorola junk) is almost the symbol of social status, somehow like owning a car in China today. It must not be that expensive right now (sorry, I don't know the current price), since my unemployed younger brother who lives with my parents now has one . The current two big things are: automobiles and computer chips. Let's see how things will be going.
Software is totally another story. What can I say ? Even the domestic Chinese companies suffer too...
I want to know how many people in UK really paid Pound 200 just for buying Windows XP alone? I bought an official Windows 98 disk from Microsoft for $5 when I was still in graduate school several years back (because my school got a deal with Microsoft), and two years ago I bought a laptop and it came with the Windows XP (so I don't know how much I actually paid for it).
BTW, I have experience living in both a developed country and a developing country. What I can tell you is that not everything in a developed country is more expensive in a developing country.

Originally posted by JiaPei Jen:

It is due to the tariffs that are imposed on the imported goods. The tariffs go to the Chinese Government. That kind of money does not go to the manufacturers.


Yes, that's true. 10 years ago, buying a Lexus at the price of Yuan 660K (including all the fees) in China was considered as a super cheap deal. Many people in southern Chinese provinces got rich by smuggling cars.
[ October 30, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
[ October 30, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago
Hi, John:
I just double checked Motorola's figure for you, and found that one article said actually China was 28% of Motorola's sales (guess the writer meant this year).
http://www.thestreet.com/_yahoo/tech/scottmoritz/10092348.html
[ October 25, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago
Hi, John:
I understand your point, but you seem not to get mine. Many people are misled by the concept "average". "Average" is just one way to compare things. It's good for some cases, but not for all. For some cases, the average is almost meaningless. Consider the two examples below:
Example 1: Student A took 3 classes and got a GPA 4.0; Student B took 30 classes and had a GPA 3.5. Can you tell me which one is a better student if only using GPA as criteria?
Example 2: Suppose you are the CEO of Motorola. Suppose UK's population is 50 million and everyone in UK will buy a Motorola cell phone, and suppose China has a population of 1 billion and only 10% of its population (i. e., 100 million) will and can afford to buy Motorola cell phone. Which market is more important to you? If you are a ruthless capitalist (which means you don't care whether the rest 90% Chinese earn $5/month and half-starve blah blah...), I would say of course it's China. In this case, the number (not percentage) counts. Actually last year nearly Motorola's 1/5 revenue came from China market if memory doesn't serve me wrong.
Do you think Boeing will sell the exact same airplane to China for any less? You know when Chinese travel abroad, what do they buy most? Digital cameras, digital camcorders, and laptops. Why? Because it's more expensive to buy the same brand and the same model in China.
I never said the salary of the Chinese people in China is comparable to the salary of people in UK (I don't think it's even close). What I was trying to say is that don't over-panic on globalization. Rich countries can still benefit from the trade with China (which is rich as a whole, but sucks on everything about average).
Have fun
J. Yan
[ October 23, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
[ October 23, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago

1.) When I see your respond, I imagine the day Chinese frugality portion of their DNA been removed.



2.) Don't be so offended.

Not at all. Most time I am mature enough. Sometimes I am just making fun here

3.) When you live in a huge populations with a very tiny economic pie, you are bounded to be a hustler. Just the human fact.

Good point.
Regards
J. Yan
[ October 22, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
16 years ago

Originally posted by John Summers:

For example, say you are IBM making WebMagic Appserver, and selling it for �3000. Who is paying �3000 for it? Indian or Chinese companies? john


Why not?
Just consider the following facts of China:
1.) World largest wireless phone market
2.) World 2nd largest PC market only behind US (will take over US as world #1 in 2010)
3.) World 4th largest car market behind US, Japan, and Germany (will take over Japan as world #2)
4.) World 8th in term of total IT spending (in 2002), predicted to be 6th in 2006 and 3rd in 2010
5.) World 4th largest importer only behind US, Japan, and Germany (surprise! China didn't refuse to buy anything made in U.S )
.......
The list will be too long if I list everything here
The only problem is that in short-term, western companies may not profit as much as they do in the developed countries. I just read some news a few days ago that IBM will provide Websphere platform for free to some Chinese companies .
16 years ago
I myself also have an English name (not official) which was picked by my wife.
Many of my American friends (whites) who ever visited China and are interested in Chinese culture have a pure Chinese name. Many famous American scholars of Chinese politics have a very classic Chinese name.
I think sometimes it might just be for fun. As far as I know, none of those names are official.
16 years ago
In Chinese, 8.88 is definitely a better number than 8.28 . Numbers like 8.98, 9.98, and 9.99 etc are good ones too
[ August 27, 2003: Message edited by: J. Yan ]
17 years ago

Originally posted by Anupam Sinha:

If India did provided the raw material (which I am doubtful of) then why can't India itself develop the product.
Secondly, I am not doubting your facts.


Very typical ...
If I was not clear, I restate it here: please don't compare Indians with Chinese. It's not for you. It's for all the Indians who have this bad habit. I personally won't take Indians as Chinese's comparison. Let's just keep our current trade pattern and keep it quietly, so that you can keep enjoying cheap inferior Chinese electronic products, and we keep enjoying fresh Indian Mango (I haven't tried them yet and hope it's not curry-smelled ). We can be good neighbors and even good friends. Do whatever you want and say whatever you want as long as don't compare Indians with Chinese...
Cheers!
17 years ago

Originally posted by Jason Kretzer:

My main goal in achieving this is to teach. I really liked teaching and I am even certified to teach high school.


Basically try your best to get into the top ones, so that after graduation the chances you can get a faculty position in big research-based universities will be relatively larger. I think the bottom line might be top 30. If you can get into a top 30 � 50 program, you probably will still be safe to get a position in a regional university where the highest degree to offer is masters, but hard to say for the schools after top 50.
The competition to be admitted to a decent CS Ph D program is pretty strong (stronger than the past three years) this year, and you will have to be fully financially prepared yourself because many schools lost a lot of funding to support Ph D students due to the bad economic situation. It's also a tough and long journey. Here is a good article from Prof. Douglas Comer at Purdue:For anyone considering a Ph.D. in Computer Science

Just my 2 cents & Good luck
17 years ago