Venkat Dabri

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since Dec 17, 2015
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Recent posts by Venkat Dabri



I am handling a file with 1 million records and my customer creates this file from his code. I might receive hundreds of these files. I have to read these records and ingest them into a database. It is possible that some of the records might be incorrectly formatted and lead to parse exceptions. What should be the exception handling philosophy here?

   I could handle the incorrectly formatted records and store them in a queue while processing all the other correct records in a file. This would require me to write extra code but once the customer fixes this error in his code the error handling code in my application will not be used ever and I would have wasted time writing and maintaining error handling code that might never be used or used sparingly.
   I could fail the entire file by letting the RuntimeException percolate upwards and let the customer correct his code and then re-submit the file again. This would keep my processing simpler but would mean that I am not processing the correct records even though I could handle it in the first pass.

1 year ago
Hello,<BR>
   I am working on a ReST based service which calls other ReST based services and also deals with Persistence in a database. So a typical call might look like

1. Get some data from the database.
2. Make a call to an external service using a ReSTClient to create a record.
3. Persist the response to the database.
4. Make another call to another service.
5. Return a response back.

The problem being that both the ReSTClient and the DB persistence layer throws only their own custom RuntimeExceptions. I don't want to pollute my code with try catch blocks around each step and so wanted to have a high level exception mapper that basically returned back a 500 error code to the caller with a basic message that the call failed. Some developers say we must put a try catch block around each step and catch the RuntimeExceptions and return back a 500 error code but also the exact reason for the failure. My experience has shown that exact error messages when shown to the user doesn't add much value since the user doesn't actually understand our system and doesn't really know what it means to have the service call fail vs a failure in the database layer, he just knows the operation has failed. Also there is no guarantee that the client calling our service is a human user, could be another service. <br>Also during development certain situations can happen like for eg. step 2 is successful but step 3 fails because of a database failure. In this case the system is in an inconsistent state where the successful call is not recorded in the DB and if the human user doesn't know this then he make execute the operation again to create two records in the external system. There would be many such cases with regards to DB and disk failures etc. that we can't predict. So do you catch these exceptions at each step and write code and error messages to handle these situations.
Hello,
I am a software developer and I am trying to find resources to research the salary and stock options offered for a new job. I usually went to payscale.com but the past couple of times I found it being pretty unhelpful. What are the other options?
4 years ago

Bear Bibeault wrote:

Venkat Dabri wrote:Most of the internet posts seems to suggesting that developers want to move from Java to PHP.


This is not something I've ever seen a trend for. But that has nothing at all to do with whether it would be a good career move for you or not.


Sorry I meant that most of the posts seems to suggest that developers want to move from PHP to Java not the other way around
4 years ago
Hello,
I have 16 years of experience in Java/J2EE. I also have working knowledge of other languages like Python, Scala etc. Recently a recruiter came up with a position in a company that is doing very well however 90% of the work will be in PHP. I was wondering as to is it a good career move to go from Java to PHP? Most of the internet posts seems to suggesting that developers want to move from Java to PHP.
4 years ago
Hello,
My concern is not of being promoted. I could easily have gotten promoted in my last job but I didn't want to continue working there. I dislike talking with my boss about promotions and my main concern is to get good interesting work. Also in the back of my mind I think that if I do a good job then promotions will come automatically without me asking for it(maybe not always trues) or else I will move. My question is how do I handle the question by some recruiters as to "If you got any promotions?" Is this a common question to be asked. In my experience about 1 in 15 do? My answer is just a simple "No". But should I explain in more detail that I did get promoted in my earlier jobs and promotion is not always my main concern. Is not being promoted considered a negative thing for software developer in the bay area or is it a common enough occurrence?
4 years ago
Hello,
It's been 7 years and I have not received a promotion in the two jobs that I held. I am a software engineer in the bay area. I was promoted in the jobs I held before that. In the first company, I am not exactly sure why I wasn't promoted even though I had never received a negative review but I never spoke with my manager about my career goals and thought if I do my work well then I will automatically be promoted. In my next job in a big company I was in 4 different teams in 3.5 years because of internal changes and managers moving out as well as priorities changing. Some job interviewers do ask this question as to if I was promoted and I was wondering as to how should I handle this?
4 years ago