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Sudd Ghosh

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since Oct 23, 2002
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Recent posts by Sudd Ghosh

Hi Brett,
I am coming from years of C++, Java, Python, and now 2 years in Golang programming, and I have a moderate statistics background. Please tell me how your book is organized for a newbie R programmer, but an otherwise experienced programmer (I tend to dislike a book with too much verbosity around the basic programming constructs). Also I hear that language R is slower than Python, and Python is waayyy slower than everything under the sky. In that case, how resilient is this language going to be in case we have enough ML libraries created for Julia, or Golang (which is Google's rich child), or someday for Java?
Thanks.
Hi author Hanumant Deshmukh,
More than 15 years ago, I was really helped by your SCWCD book, and used that knowledge for many years in Struts/Spring MVC web programming using Servlets/JSP. Now looking forward to recertify in Java 11 (I have Sun cert in Java 1.4), as I have started working in Springboot on OpenJDK 11 (after 2 years working in Golang). Intially, I was thinking about Java 8. So my question is, I see Java 11 has all the good things that came in with Java 6, 7, 8 (like NIO, date/time, stream, lambdas, modules, more on Future, etc). I see it did get rid of some unwanted J2EE APIs that overtime leaked into J2SE. So, mostly API removal from Java 8, and not that many additions (String isBlank(), etc). Is it then too different from Java 8 certification? Is there an upgrade path for Sun Java 1.4 cert holders? Is the overall path similar to Associate and Programmer certification as before?

Good luck with your book sale. Looking forward to earn your book free and get ready for some serious study.
Thanks, Sudd
Thanks for that info. Then what all Java SE components, like JAXB, etc are getting impacted, and any possible alternatives for those? Also Java EE modules and JAXB are used quite a lot in the Java EE world (applications which still uses XML data instead of JSON). So does it imply then, that all the old Java EE applications need to be revisited if moving to Java 11 for SE? I would like to see in-depth information on this in the book.
1 year ago
Hi author of  - Java Projects: Learn the fundamentals of Java 11 programming,
Did you enumerate in the book succinctly, which JEE features (EJB, Servlets, JMS, JSF, and other Oracle memory heavy frameworks, like Toplink/JPA, and others), are removed from Java 11, and what are the best industry frameworks available to the programmer (or best practices) to fill that void? In addition, what new stuff are added to Java 11?
Thanks, Sudd
1 year ago
Thanks for your reply. I will look forward to reading this book.
Hi Kathy, I am getting back to the Javaranch after a long hiatus. Remember, I was a reviewer of the Head First Java and Java 1.4 certification books. It is refreshing to see you back. Will look into the new Java stuff. These days I am developing with Golang and Angular - full stack, and the docker/container/kubernetes orchestration. So haven't looked at all into Java 9 and beyond - the cloud friendly Java 10, 11, I suppose. Time to get back and see what's going on there. Anyways, thanks again for being available here.
Does this book addresses the following items:
1. A discussion on the cloud/container friendly programming languages (like latest Java, Go, Rust), and what characteristics of any programming language can make it more or less container friendly, with reference to stack/heap memory footprint, storage and other resource consumption, etc.
2. Which aspects of the software life cycle should be addressed upfront to make it more practical/efficient for an application to live on the public cloud, and the design patterns to follow. For example, a simple step like regression testing by a QA engineer of a cloud application can result in a lot of cloud billing.
3. Does it go deep into AWS and GCP and talk about pros and cons of each? Does it go into steps on how to optimize the free tier usage?
Thanks much.
Thanks much Steve for the detailed explanation. I am sure it will feel refreshing to read the event handling logic changes.
Realizing, I am still picking pebbles on the sea shore. So many more things to learn..
3 years ago
Hi FRP book author(s),
Is FRP a programming paradigm or a design pattern, involving immutable objects, lambdas, closures, functional programming, etc, or is it some programming language which facilitates the use of all these patterns?  If this is only a paradigm, then --
1. Is the book organised like a typical design pattern book? Does it have enough examples? If so, in which language?
2. Please suggest the best programming languages to implement FRP (please include Java, Scala, C++, etc, in your ranking).
Thanks much, Sudd
3 years ago
With JPA/Hibernate (mainly with Sprng Data JPA packages), the @EntiityManager is by default at the transaction scope, and if the transaction has multiple threads, then it is at the thread scope. The scope can be expanded with some EM options. Google the use of EM, EM Factory, etc.
So createCriteria (CriteriaBuilder, CriteriaQuery, Root) should work. I think you mainly need to set your persistence.xml, PersistenceContext, EM Factory (should be a singleton) and EM (should be per transaction/thread) correctly. You don't want to set the transaction boundaries manually.
3 years ago
I am coming back to Java Ranch after almost a decade.
Very good and useful discussion on the performance of ArrayList versus LinkedList. So, as I  understand, LinkedList is good for adding/removing to/from the end or beginning of a list, and "get" from the end and beginning. For any other indexed get, add or remove operation, ArrayList is still better, since LinkedList has to do the indexed get first for any operation, which is expensive.
Just got this link today from somewhere with the note:
"The Democratic National Committee and Organizing for America have openings for several technical positions in our New Media and Technology departments -- and we'd like to invite you to apply."

This is for Washigton DC IT jobs.
http://my.barackobama.com/page/s/techjobapp
11 years ago
To the author:
I got my answer to the first question on Struts1 versus Struts2 from the Apache site.
However, I am still curious to know to what extent your book goes into the details of the Structs/Ajax interface?
Thanks, Sudd
12 years ago
To the author:
Does the book provide an explanation of the conceptual reasons for the enhancements in Struts 2 from Struts 1 ?. Like thread safe action class - eliminating the need to pass the arguments in the execute() method, etc.

Does it provide details into the Ajax related Structs 2.1 enhancements, like the retriveUrl() method? Last time I read a book on "Struts with Ajax", the Ajax was mentioned in only one chapter - 12 pages (out of which 8 pages are just code). In this book the responseXML was generated in the brute-force way. I guess Struts has some inherent support for Ajax, where the action invoked from a form, after doing all the business logic and getting the updated form attributes, updates/renders the form with the responseXML - without much work for the developer to parse the responseXML and repopulate the form. Please advise if your book goes into this.
12 years ago
I was kind of getting impressed by the architectural changes in EJB3.0 compared to EJB2.0, after going through Mike Keith's JPA book, but then I came across the complexity in annotations - so many of them. I think if there was a way to simplify this, that would have been of great help. I understand it is a framework specs and it has to accomodate everyone's needs, has to accomodate all kinds of relationships, etc.

I definitely liked the conceptual changes in EJB3.0; in a way these changes aligned EJB3.0 with other event-driven framework's backend, like keeping one request in one JVM (no need of remoting), having only POJO entities (no entity beans), etc.. Hence the learning curve will not be that steep if one is familiar with any such framework's backend.