Sue Spielman

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since Apr 21, 2003
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Recent posts by Sue Spielman

If you use the var attribute, the value of the action will be stored into the variable only. It will default to a page scope variable.You can change the scope by also using the optional scope attribute.
FYI, there are samples of all of the JSTL action in use in the free download that accompanies my book, 'JSTL: Practical Guide for JSP Programmers'
HTH
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Hi all. I am travelling today, so I won't be able to respond to questions during the day. I hope whoever wins the book today enjoys it and will let me know what you think! Thanks for having me in the forum this week.

Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Manoj:
I agree with Bear, if your tags are causing you more problems, then chances are that they aren't designed well. They probably contain business logic, which is why when your UI requirements are changing; the business logic is also changing. Try thinking of the tags as a way to help with presentation logic, not business logic. Business logic is better in a Bean or Action class.
Sue
[ October 02, 2003: Message edited by: Sue Spielman ]
14 years ago
JSP
Charles:
<c:import> provides more felxibility to the page author by allowing content to be specified from other web applications (or contexts) or even other web servers. You can't do that with <jsp:include> or <% include %>. You can also have content in a scipe variable as either a String or a java.io.Reader object when using <c:import>. There's also some performance improvements regarding buffering when using <c:import>.
HTH.
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
They all really compliment each other. Here's how:
-Struts is a framework, or better yet, it's an implementation of the MVC design pattern
-JSF is collection of objects for creating server-side GUI components
-JSTL is used for presentation logic
All of them can/will work together.
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Well, I am busy on my next book, but never to busy to answer questions .
I feel that the performance issues related to using the JSTL are minimal. If you are adding any code, regardless of what it is, obviously you will have some addition of runtime instructions. However, the additional overhead is not even worth the consideration. Usually there are more pressing issues in an application that can be optimized (such as in business logic) that will get more bang for your buck. What is worth much more is the time spent coding, the amount of debugging required, and the easy of maintenence in your application View files. That is worth more to me and the development teams I work with then 1 ms in saved page execution.
my .02 cents!
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
It's important to keep a perspective here. So I'll give you mine on the points of that article concerning the disadvatages.
Disadvantage: Overhead
I highly disagree here. There are ways (like precompiling JSPs) to mitigate this. As other implementations of the JSTL make their way into app servers they will be highly optimized, so I think this point is not really valid
Disadvantage: Not as Extensive as JSP Scriptlet
I also disagree. I have seen the most horrendous code in JSPs all in the name of Scriplets! 99% of the time the scriplet code is doing some business logic (not presentation logic) and just added a maintenance headache into the application. You have access (very easy access) to objects in the JSTL that make it easier and cleaner to use.
Disadvantage: May Seem Burdensome for Experienced Programmers
I also disagree here. If you are working with JSPs, you are probably also using custom actions. If you are using custom actions, I know I'd rather learn a full-featured set of actions once, This is usually the case because a different developer wrote yet another iteration tag. I think your productivity goes way up after you've spent a very short time with the JSTL.
14 years ago
JSP
Hi Vasu. JSTL is the JSP Standard Tag Library. It's a collection of frequently used actions that make creating JSPs much easier, more readable, and more maintainable. The Expression Language (EL) was first introduced with the JSTL, but the support of it has now been moved to JSP 2.0. It allows for easy access to objects, and a much cleaner way to deal with presentation data. It should help eliminate the need for using Scriplets in your code. Overall, the JSTL is a technology that most any JSP developer will want to become familiar with and use in their development.
You asked what my motivation was for writing the book? If there is a technology that can make a big impact in a developer´┐Żs life, I'm usually on it when it comes out. The JSTL was one such technology, so I decided that the practical guide would be a very helpful and useful way to come up to speed very quickly. You'll have to let me know what you think of the book if you get a chance to read it!
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Thanks all!
14 years ago
JSP
While book is primarily based on JSTL 1.0, it covers the features of the EL using JSP 2.0. Since the v1.1 wasn't out when the book was being finalized, I made sure that I tested everything with Tomcat 5.0 (which is where the JSP 2.0 support is). There are some bug fixes in JSTL v1.1, as well as the support of functions. Other then that, everything that is contained in the book is applicable to JSTL 1.1 and you should be 99% of the way there. I'll probably write an article on the function support, since it is pretty easy and then the material will be 100% there .
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Well, I guess I'll start by just saying that the word 'practical' is in the title for a reason . As a developer myself, I tend to write books that a developer would really want to use. I like my books to be open on people's desks, not on their bookshelf. So the entire book includes code samples for every one of the actions in the JSTL with a detailed explanation of ways to do things. It also includes ways not to do things, which is just as important. The code samples can be cut and pasted from the download. In fact, I just checked, and in the entire book there's nary a page without code on it. There's also a quick reference guide that can be used during development that has all of the actions with all of their attributes and a quick sample. I'm not aware of any other resource that has it.
Hopefully, all of this combined has made you want to run out and get a copy .
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
Thanks Ko! I hope that many developers find the book helpful in their daily development. The best thing about writing books is when someone tells you that it really helped them!
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
John, most of the default scoping used by the JSTL is page, not session. Are you explictly setting the scope attribute to session? If not, which actions are you talking about?
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
While you can use Struts without the Struts taglibs, using the Struts taglibs (for some of the actions) might require some coding on your part. The Struts framework is setup to take advantage (under the covers) of objects that might be created from the taglibs, so the information is pulled out in the framework. You'd probably need to look at the actions you're thinking of using and see if there are any further action needed on your part in your application. Some of them will probably work fine though.
Sue
14 years ago
JSP
The EL also has a number of advantages over Scriptlets. Such as
[LIST]
[*]cleaner syntax
[*]implict objects
[*]ability to access data structures
[*]operators
[*]automatic type conversion
just to name a few. Besides which, if you are using scriplets in your JSP code you are probably performing some type of logic that is better served in an Object.
Sue
14 years ago
JSP