Magnus Stattin

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Recent posts by Magnus Stattin

Thank you for a thorough definition Thomas.

I have a question regarding the granularity of services. At point no 4.( SOA promotes service encapsulation and reuse) you state that individual services with clearly defined functional boundaries can be composed by different parent tasks and that functions, tasks and processes all can be modelled as services.

Do you have any recommendations how coarse grained services that are exposed as Web Services should be. Could even fine grained services be exposed and wouldn't the performance hit for this make it hard in reality?

The reason that a ask is that I believe this to be very important for the re-usability of services. Too coarse grained services would be hard to re-use in different situations with different requirements.

/Magnus
[ June 18, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
16 years ago
Hello Keith
I used both and I found that SoftSCBCD was very close to the real exam. As you say the questions are more straightforward and there are fewer errors. I would highly recommend the tutorial in SoftSCBCD, as it gives a good overview. The score I got on the softSCBCD in the end was close to what I got on the real exam.
Good luck
/Magnus
It would be called from a finder method defined in the home interface like this for example:
public Order findByProductName(String name);
Hope I understood your question
/Magnus
The application exception is regarded as expected and have to be handled by the invoker. As the invoker expect the exception the exception is supposed to be handled more gracefully than by just kill the bean.
The system exception is not expected and seen as something that there is nothing to do anything about. In that case the container tries to limit the damage as much as possible by killing the bean.
/Magnus
To have this access you have to be in a transactional context OR have a client security context.
In ejbCreate and ejbRemove in a session bean you do not have a transactional context.
In a stateful session bean you do have a client security context in ejbCreate and ejbRemove as opposed to in a stateless session bean.
That gives you access in a stateful session bean, but not in a stateless.

/Hope it helps
Magnus
[ January 29, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
The problem seems to be that AdviceClient.class is not found. Make sure it is in the D:\home\projects\advice folder.
On windows you should use semicolons instead of colons between files on the classpath like this:
java -cp %CLASSPATH%;AdviceAppClient.jar AdviceClient
You are very close
/Magnus
[ January 28, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
Please make sure that you have a dot in the CLASSPATH to include the current working directory.
Something like this:
CLASSPATH = "c:\j2sdkee1.3.1\lib\j2ee.jar;."
Hope it helps
/Magnus
You need the ejb spec rather than the j2ee spec.
You can find it here
Be sure to download the 2.0 version.
Best Regards
/Magnus
There is a tool called Workshop for weblogic.
You can find it here
/Magnus
I think this is a bug in the RI, one of several.
Please see
this thread
Regards
/Magnus
I just got back from the real exam scoring 98%
Here is how I prepared for the exam:
1) I read Head First EJB very thoroughly and underlined the most important concepts. I focused on understanding rather than trying to just memorize as much as possible. The book is excellent for that.
2) I did serveral mock exams. I tried serveral ones and found softSCBCD to be the best one.
3) I did not read the spec. I just used it to look thing up that I didn't understand. I read the hole chapter on EJB-QL, as I couldn't find all answers in HF for mock questions regarding that.
I would like to thank everyone here for your help and inspiration.
Best regards
/Magnus
[ January 23, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
[ January 23, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
16 years ago
Yes entity beans do have a client view, the column has just been left out in the answers. The point here is only that Message Driven Beans do not.
/Magnus
Hello Anthony
Thanks for a very good motivation for taking the SCBCD certification. My plans are very similar to yours. I have also read Rod's book and have started to use the Spring Framework in combination with EJB. It is truly a great book and his framework is brilliant as well.
I will take the exam tomorrow and then start working with building real applications.
Best regards
/Magnus
You are right, the missing ejbPostCreate() method is mentioned in the unconfirmed errata for the book.
You are right about the home business method as well.
Regards
/Magnus
Hello Vipin
This is what I know about this:
The TransactionRolledbackException will only be thrown when the rollback happens because of an exception in the called method.
As the rollback must be caused by the exception it must be a system exception.
If the called method is just doing a regular rollback with setRollbackOnly() the TransactionRolledbackException will not be called.
The called method have to be in the same transaction as the client, if the called method is in a transaction of its own it is not necessary for the called bean to inform the client about the rollback. The client would get a RemoteException or a EJBException in that case.
Please correct me if I'm wrong. Based on this I'm unable to find a second correct choice. If the method is demarcated with NotSupported and that is not supported by the application server i think that would be known at deploy time and not come as a suprise at runtime. My guess is that it will not even deploy in that case.
/Magnus
[ January 22, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
[ January 22, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]
[ January 22, 2004: Message edited by: Magnus Stattin ]