Granny's Programming Pearls
"inside of every large program is a small program struggling to get out"
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Paul Pullman

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since Jun 28, 2003
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Recent posts by Paul Pullman

Shay and Tim,
You were so right!
Over the many years, I have been changing and trying to find the right ass(es) to kiss whereever I worked.
Paul
16 years ago
Just read in my hotel room that the local economy of this state was growing last month, including the job market. Even though the best-performing sectors were business services,IT was not one of them, and they were office assistants, dating services, dry cleaning, and home repair. If that will be trend, it is not encouraging at all!
Well, let's hope they were hiring those office assistants to greet us when we all come in for an interview in the months and years to come.
Paul
16 years ago
L-1 was intended to grant to foreign executives of US international companies to work in the US for a short term. However, many foreign, in particular Indian, consulting companies have been using it to bring thousands of software developers as co-CEOs, VPs and the likes into this country to do consulting work for US companies. Dishonest? Immoral?
Paul
16 years ago
The Middle East???
No way! They are paid handsomely by foreign petroleum companies. They also have four wives to entertain or are busy trying to score four of them. They get not motive and time to do programming.
Don't worry about them.
Paul
16 years ago

As to the outsourcing of interpretation of medical tests, I have never heard of this, doubt it ever happens,...


Something like this was reported on either BusinessWeek or Time late last year or very early this year.
Paul
16 years ago
A few years ago, we were discussing the same thing with the same excitement as the people in this thread do NOW:
https://coderanch.com/t/28019/Jobs/careers/much-Salary-should-expect
Do you think we have another chance in our life, even at much more moderate scale? Maybe two or more genrations later?
That was a wonderful time!!!
Paul
16 years ago

Dr. Kellner wrote:
You can see this in the jobless rate for managers and professionals. They now account for almost a fifth of the unemployed. At the end of the 1990-91
recession, they were 11 percent; 20 years ago little more than 6 percent.


Unfortunately, if the stat is correct it confirms what I have been speculating and afraid of --- the pie is getting smaller, the wage is going down, we need to do something (unionization, lobby, and so on) to try to keep what we have for as long as possible.
Do the numbers imply that MBA and management path is not an alternative afterall? On the other hand, my neighbor has been having a hard time to find someone to mow his lawn. I don't think this kind of jobs can be offshored just yet.
Paul
16 years ago
You should if you can get into the top five business schools or you are asked to get ready to take over a family-owned multimillion dollar business. Over the past years, many new graduates of top schools could not land a job at the time of graduation and had to move back homes. It is a fact reported in business magazines, like BusinessWeek.
When the pie is getting smaller, how many people we need to look after it. The oversea high tech (and other) markets are a threat to us, because their own pies have been very small and are not getting any bigger internally in the near term while those nations have been pumping out tons of undergraduates and graduates (high tech or not) over the years. The American corporate is going to take advanyage of it. Our pie will be getting smaller.
I am open-minded and is willing to listen.
Paul
16 years ago
To large IT or non-IT corporations, the number, 10%, appears to be way too conservative. For instance, recent reports showed that 1/3 of Microsoft's 5000 new jobs this year would be going to foreign countries.
Paul
[ July 29, 2003: Message edited by: Paul Pullman ]
16 years ago

Originally posted by Andres:
The only way to prevent offshoring (from any country, not only US) is to demonstrate that we are proactive, productive, generating new ways of doing things (in terms of software developement (applying things like continuous integration, testing, MDA, AOP, etc.., anything that shows innovation and productivity). In essence, that we are different from the others, and that we are worth the money we're getting.


A few months ago, Scott Ambler had a piece discussing some of these on Software Development magazine. I wasn't convinced. We have the talent to develop new ideas, new products, and all the new stuffs. Most of the times, however, other people had the ability to fine tune those stuffs and we started losing grounds. Two exceptions on top of my head are NASA and Boeing. They are in the industries that are so capital intensive that no country or countries have the financial resouces to support their competitors like US government can provide them.
Paul
16 years ago
There will be no way to stop the train or preventing the train from moving. The pie is going to getting smaller and smaller. The average wage is going to go down and level off. The population of IT students will be decreasing as many 2nd, 3rd, and 4th tierd school's computer sciences/engineering programs will be shutting down. However, the ratio of foreign students will be increasing and most, if not all, of thes CS students will be heading back home right after school or hired by foreign consulting companies to work here. H1B visas will be no longer an issue while L1 will serve its intended purpose, bringing corporate VPs of software development (and other executives) from a foreign country to work here for a period of time. The most recent announcement from MicroSoft that 1/3 of the 5000 new jobs will be offshoring should convince you this scenario. There will be no techies left for any level of management. I am not saying this is going to happen overnight. But believe it or not it is the trend, just starting to climb.
Why should we lobby, unionize or do whatever? We want to keep whatever we have now for as long as it is possible. Every person currently involved in any stage of software development is in the same boat in my opinion. We are all one of the apples, or oranges, or whatever of that same tree.
Paul
16 years ago
Also, please tell your representatives and the administration that they need to clean up their own back yard. They must spend our hard-earned tax dollars on US citizens.
I am working in a federal-funded project, where the US consulting firm (my employer) also has hired tons of H-1B foreign programmers over the past year for this project. In the mean time, many of my friends has had a hard time finding work.
Paul
16 years ago
I believe Carnegie Mellon U has been one of the top, if not the top, overall in CS.
Paul
16 years ago

Well, my upcoming book comes to mind... :-)


Mark,
Look forward to it.
Paul
16 years ago
Mark,

What was the Chrysler Project? I'm not familiar with it.


It is considered to be the birth place of XP. I saw it being mentioned from time to time in articles talking about development process and XP in particular. Kent Beck could tell you a lot more in this recent interview, link:
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-beck/
No disagreement on your comments on the soft side of the software development, which differs from the traditional manufacturing. Is there something
in the cooking to better tackle this? The MDA speccification from OMG came to mind. Thoughts?
Paul
16 years ago