Ashish Sarin

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since Nov 20, 2000
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Recent posts by Ashish Sarin

Congratulations to all the winners !!
And, thanks to everyone for participating.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Pete,

This the 'best' time to get into reactive Spring. Reactive support for JDBC will be there once reactive JDBC drivers (which are being developed) are available. Btw, these days many applications don't even use typical JDBC databases.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Chintan,

The book doesn't cover Spring Boot/Microservices.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Afrim,

The only prequisite is that you are familiar with Java and with basic design patterns (like, Factory and Singleton). If you have developed applications using JSPs/Servlets that interact with a relational database, then the book is very simple for you to follow.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Durim,

The only 'Hello World !' example that you'll see in this book is in the first chapter. The rest of the chapters aim to help you build real-world applications.
With this edition of book, we've introduced fresh content on functional programming, reactive programming using RxJava 2 and Spring Reactor, developing reactive RESTful web services using Spring Data MongoDB and Spring Security, developing reactive web applications using Spring WebFlux, accessing RESTful web services using WebClient, and so on.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Pete,

Whenever a new release happens you should read the release notes to find out what has changed since the last release, what things are no longer compatible, and so on.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Pete,

Good question !
I've focused only on topics that are relevant to *most* Spring developers. For this reason, I haven't covered Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and other projects, that are not relevant to most Spring developers.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi,

The books are different in how the authors present the topics. I find that Getting started with Spring Framework books goes into the depth and width of the Spring Framework, and provides numerous simple examples (close to 88 sample projects) to get you started with Spring Framework. It is also the first book currently that discusses function/reactive programming support in Spring 5.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Vyanktesh,

The book talks about what has changed since Spring 4. Yes, its easy to migrate from Spring 4 to Spring 5.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi David,

This book is 'ideal' for someone who has never worked on Spring Framework.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi David,

The first chapter does mention about what has changed in Spring 5. It points to chapters where you can find details about those changes in the book.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Anthony,

It's true that currently we don't have JDBC drivers that provide reactive access to the databases. There are no limitations with using Spring WebFlux with a blocking data acess layer, at the same time, there are no tangible advantages either.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Keith,

The book has a specific chapter on AOP that covers all aspects of Spring's support for AOP. If you read the chapter, you'll get the idea that AOP is used wherever there are cross-cutting concerns.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Kim,

You are bang-on at "this book could be useful in keeping various papers and receipts I have on my desk from flying around". This is one of the most sought after use of the book. It doesn't just keep the receipts but also protects them from dust and sunlight. Some readers have gone to an extent to say that their receipts were looking much better after they were kept in the book for more than a day.

Regards
Ashish
1 year ago
Hi Divya,

You don't need to know Java 9 features to read the book or learn Spring 5.

regards
Ashish
1 year ago