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Sunny Dai

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since Sep 29, 2003
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Recent posts by Sunny Dai

Hi, HS Thomas:
Go to google, and search by key words "father of deep blue Feng-hsiung Hsu". Many links will come out, and I list the first few below:
http://pup.princeton.edu/titles/7342.html
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0691090653/103-8139760-1439041?v=glance&vi=reviews
16 years ago
The following information is for those people who don't have a clue of Microsoft Research.
Microsoft totally has 5 research labs worldwide: three in US, one in UK, and one in China.
Many researchers in Microsoft Research China (they re-named it Microsoft Research Asia now) are world class scientists. Just name two here:
1.) Ya-Qin Zhang, former director, became an IEEE fellow in his late 20s (it's still a record in IEEE history now).
2.) Feng-hsiung Hsu, senior researcher, is the founding father of IBM's Deep Blue project.
BTW, this is actually not the topic that I was originally interested in discussion.
[ March 17, 2004: Message edited by: Sunny Dai ]
16 years ago
Microsoft hopes for return on costly investment in China
Microsoft did make a very good point here:
"They'll pay for our software when they come to the conclusion they have to pay for their own software. China will ultimately determine they must have a local software economy and create a legal environment where people pay for software."
[ March 17, 2004: Message edited by: Sunny Dai ]
16 years ago
Your salary looks consistent with ComputerWorld's Salary Comparison Report on April 28, 2003.
Based on that article, the average salary for a systems programmer in the U.S. is $63,331, and it's $8,952 in China.
[ March 10, 2004: Message edited by: Sunny Dai ]
16 years ago
I just started looking for a Sr. Java Developer/Software Engineer position (which is clearly stated as my objective on my resume) a few days ago. I selected several target companies to send my resume, and meanwhile posted my resume on the Internet too. Until now I already got 7 inquiry emails from different recruiters who found my resume on the Internet. The things that amazed me is 5 out of 7 emails were asking whether I was interested in a Java Architect position, and a phone interview will be conducted next week.
I don't understand why this has happened. Am I overqualified as a Sr. Java Developer? or is the market desperate of finding qualified Java Architects? How many chances will I get to be hired as a Java Architect without previous architect experience? What questions will usually be asked for the Java Architect position?
Thanks in advance!
16 years ago
Will I get a "certificate" for part I if I pass it?
My company is willing to reimburse all my exam fees. I don't know how far I will (and am able) to go for the SCEA exams. After reading some postings on this site, it seems to me that passing part I is not very difficult. Will I get a "certificate" for part I if I pass it? So that I can get my exam fee from my company even if I decide not to take part II and part III (or fail on them) later.
Another stupid question:
If I pass the part I but fail on part II and part III, do I have to start over again from part I?
Thanks
Sunny Dai
SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, and IBM XML