Alenka Shtykel

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since Oct 24, 2003
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Recent posts by Alenka Shtykel

For guys a suit with a tie is usually a standard. However, for girls it's a little more complicated. Should she wear a skirt or pants? How about jewelry, cosmetics, etc?
17 years ago

Originally posted by stara szkapa:
There is a major difference. Accounting is a profession and programming is not. Profession meaning there are certain quality standards, liability, ethics, education requirements. A professional has to conform to those standards, or otherwise he will be not allowed practice. A professional needs liability insurance. If he makes too many mistakes his insurance will go up an ultimately he will not be able to practice. In IT there are no quality standards, no ethics, no liability. For this reason it is easy to outsource or bring in foreign workers. People involved in IT never recognized the need to regulate this occupation and make it a profession, and therefore they pay the price.
[ November 25, 2003: Message edited by: stara szkapa ]


Why would you say that IT is not a profession? If you apply principles of software engineering, then programming is a science with quality standards, ethics, etc.
17 years ago
What can I do so that sessions were not getting confused? Has anyone ever encountered this problem. Thanks!
17 years ago
JSP
I am currently working on development of an application in jsp/java. However, I have a problem, which I am not sure how to solve. If I open two browsers on the same computer and login into application as two different users, after some clicks, one of the users becomes the other user. In other words, both browsers will now display his or her name at the top.. and both will have access to the same functionality. This is very dangerous as I want to restrict certain users from accessing certain functions. Refreshing the page doesn't work, so I was thinking that maybe it's a server-side caching. Does anyone have any ideas? Please help! Thank you very much.
Best,
Alenka
17 years ago
JSP
Yep, definitely, if I am going to mention it at all, I'll mention it at the end of my interview. It's just I don't want them to think that I do not want them.. since I already have an offer. I am thinking to tell them about it at the end when asking about the next step. I'll say something like "when can I expect to hear from you?". After I get a reply, I'll tell them that I really want to work for their company (and I do), but that I have till Dec 1 to accept another offer. So, I'd greatly appreciate to hear a reply from them before that date. Do you guys think that's a good strategy to take? Thank you very much.
Sincerely,
Alenka
17 years ago
I just got an offer from a nice company, but I have only 2 weeks to accept it. I have an interview at a different company in a few days. I am afraid that I might hear from them too late and loose a great opportunity. So, I thought maybe I should let that other company know that I am pressed for time. However, I do not want to offend the other company in any way by letting them know about this. I was wondering if you guys have any suggestions as to what I could say and how. I'd really appreciate it. Perhaps I shouldn't say anything and hope that they'll reply fast? Thank you very much.
Sincerely,
Alenka
[ November 22, 2003: Message edited by: Alenka Shtykel ]
17 years ago
Yep definitely. I hear Cobol programers have an easy transition to Java. So, best of luck there!!!
17 years ago

Originally posted by Svetlana Koshkina:
You know people,
I ran into job announcement at U of Chicago that said:
blah-blah (no problem) required
Java, Perl, C/C++ knowlege *preferred*;
MySQL, JDBC, Tomcat *preferred*...
blah-blah (no problem)
....
I applied because I know Java and have everything: MySQL, Tomcat and much more at home. Have it or it has me? on daily basis. I know basics of C and Perl programming. Lately I gave to C much more thought.
I applied naturally. I was given 'technical' interview. It was laughable and did not do anything with daily programming and above all bioinformatics (how to print word in Perl or in Java - no kidding).
The guy who did the interview said that "strong ability" in C is essential. It'd thrown me off track right away. What the heck? Look at your job announcement - right?
Afterwards, i gave phone call to the 'would-to-be-boss' (she has no idea about programming' and asked her to give me some trial assignment, so while she was looking i could at least test my skills and my ability and do some useful stuff. She was rude, did not acknowlege that she gave wrong and misleading announcement (i did not asked her about that - i was polite and very tactful), she said that all most talented and gifted programmers from coast to coast are just lined up for her and i can shove it big deal and i eat up her precious time just by calling and bothering her.
I was so insulted, guys, i was near to puking after that 'chat'.
Just experience.


Ahh, I am so sorry to hear that. I have had some not pleasant interview experiences and I know how you feel. It's really their loss. I wish you to find a better position and become top programmer in the field. Show them! If I ever be interviewing someone, I'll be nice and courteous with them.. and I'll make them feel comfortable. Good luck!
17 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

Yes! I think people are afriad to change jobs now. I also think anyone underpaid, which will often be top people, will flee as soon as the market turns around.
--Mark


Do you ever hire entry-level people or only experienced? :roll: From my understanding you generally require people with a lot of skills.
17 years ago
I wonder if I'll ever be in the position of conducting interviews with potential employees. hm..
17 years ago

Originally posted by Carlisia Campos:
Programmer: average growth
Software Engineer: much faster than average growth
Apparently they see a world of difference between the two...


nowadays, companies outsource more and more to countries such as India, where they get a lot of programming done. However, in US they will always need good software designers. That's why software engineering is a crucial skill to have (besides programming). It'll be probably much more easier for a software engineer to find a job, than for a programmer.
17 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

Never. No two people are ever that similar. :-p
--Mark


heh that's good It would be tough to having to make such choice.
17 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

As noted by others, two otherwise equal candidates who differ only in age will require a coin flip. I will not choose one over the other based on age.
--Mark


I was just wondering, have you ever faced a situation where you couldn't choose between two candidates and you flipped a coin to decide who will get the job?
17 years ago

Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

This is very important...
You must learn to do this! Not necessarily the raise itself, but you must learn to be proactive about your needs. Many managers out there do have pointy hair. You cannot rely on them to handle your career development (one of the reasons I left an old company was because of what I saw the manager doing to the junior engineers despite my repeated requests that he provide better growth opportunities for them). You must learn to stand up for your needs. This does not mean fighting, but it does mean proactively communicating with your manager.
I liken it to boating on a river. You can sit in your boat and see where the current takes you, or you can choose to paddle, working with the current (and occasionally against it) to get where you want and to get there faster. Don't just float through your career.
--Mark


Yep, I certainly agree with you, that it's very important to be able to ask for a raise. I'd have to work a lot on myself to be able to actually do this though. However, in my current situation I couldn't possibly ask for a raise, even though I know that I am underpaid. My company is not doing so well and they are planning to fire 300 very soon. They just do not have the money.
17 years ago
I don't think I could ever ask for a raise. I don't know.. it's probably not good, but I feel I would never find it in me to ask for more money. I'd just be working very hard and waiting for my manager to give me a raise if he or she feels I deserve it.
17 years ago