Isaac Liu

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since Nov 29, 2003
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Recent posts by Isaac Liu

Thank you very much for your replies!
I am clear about the remote and local bean instances now. But in a typical shopping web site design there is a shopping cart stateful session bean. This needs to be accessible from both EJB side and web server side. How should I model the session facade?
TIA,
[ December 22, 2003: Message edited by: Isaac Liu ]
Can a session facade have both local and remote interfaces at the same time? In particular for a stateful session facade can I access both the remote and local bean that hold the same state?
In the pet store sample application, both the web server and the EJB container are assumed to be running in the same virtual machine. If the web server runs in another machine, then the ShoppingClientFacade needs a remote interface to make it accessible to the web server side. In the mean time this facade also has to be accessible by the EJBController, which resides in the EJB side. So a local interface is also needed for this facade.
The Core J2EE Pattern book only talks about remote session facade. But from a pure OO point of view it is quite reasonable to have a facade to encapsulate some components so that others (either remote or local) access these components through this facade alone.
TIA,
Can a session facade have both local and remote interfaces at the same time? In particular for a stateful session facade can I access both the remote and local bean that hold the same state?
In the pet store sample application, both the web server and the EJB container are assumed to be running in the same virtual machine. If the web server runs in another machine, then the ShoppingClientFacade needs a remote interface to make it accessible to the web server side. In the mean time this facade also has to be accessible by the EJBController, which resides in the EJB side. So a local interface is also needed for this facade.
The Core J2EE Pattern book only talks about remote session facade. But from a pure OO point of view it is quite reasonable to have a facade to encapsulate some components so that others (either remote or local) access these components through this facade alone.
TIA,
I am using Visio for the diagrams. I can get GIF / JPG image files in different resolutions. I am having troubles to get a reasonable quality for both display and print with either IE (6.0) or Netscrape (7.1). If I choose a higher resolution, I could not make it print within one page from the browser. The printout from Visio looks so pretty while the printout from the browsers looks kind of fuzzy.
This might be very easy. But please do help.
TIA,
Thanks for your reply! But I am wondering why it is not even mentioned in the Core J2EE book (2nd ed), at least I can not find it in the index. Is it still a good practice to use it? I am asking this question because I am planning to use something similar to the catalog for the assignment.
Thanks,
In the sample petstore application the code (version 1.3.2) uses the fast lane reader pattern for the catalog while the two documents do not even mention this pattern. The document actually talks about using a stateless session bean for the catalog. The Core J2EE Pattern book does not mention it either. Anybody know why?
TIA
My question is about Figure 14 in the Petsore doc titled "Sample Application Design and Implementation". I am not clear why there is an arrow from TemplateService to the Servlet Filter and then another arrow going out of the big box. This is related to SCEA II because I am trying to follow the petstore approach.
Thanks.
In Petstore .do uses MainServlet while .screen uses TemplateServlet. What about the servlet filter? Does everything go through the filter first and then branch out to the MainServlet or TemplateServlet?
TIA