Leon Webster

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since Dec 06, 2000
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Recent posts by Leon Webster

JDK 1.4 added a preferences API, and according to the Design FAQ "It is intended to replace most common uses of Properties, rectifying many of its deficiencies, while retaining its light weight."
I was coding a small database application, and decided that I should put the url for the database driver and four or five other bits of information into a properties file so that a) they weren't hard coded and b) they could be easily moved from my development enviroment into a production environment and modified for that environment. since I knew that there was this new API, read about it in Gregory Travis' _JDK 1.4 Tutorial_ and most of the online Sun documentation. But I am unconvinced of its usefulness.
First, I can't find an easy way to hand-code preferences files. Admittedly, as the design FAQ says, properties files are "brittle" and easily broken by careless editing, but it seems a bit much write a program to store a few strings. Secondly, once I have a preferences file established, I have to have another program to export them from one enviroment and into another enviroment. In many ways the whole point of properties files is to make this sort of portability easy.
But I also know the preferences api was written by Joshua Bloch who wrote _Effective Java_ a book that i liked a lot. So I am not willing to write the preferences api off with out thinking about it for just a bit.
My question for the forum is: "has anyone migrated system configuration information from properties files to the preferences api, and what have the results been?" Were you pleased with the experience? How do you migrate from one platform to another?
Thanks for any input.
Leon Webster
15 years ago
Great. I will have a look at infopop and jive.
The help is much appreciated.
Leon
17 years ago
I am working on a small web application that needs to have a "bulletin board" function similar to the the Big Moose Saloon. Being sane people, we would prefer to either use open source software or pay a small fee for the software (this is a really low low budget operation).
am I correct in assuming the saloon uses cgi/perl? I had hoped to use Java, but not a big deal... Is it based on some other product?
thanks much
17 years ago
Thanks for all the good wishes and good luck to all of you.
Leon
17 years ago
Peter,
I took the Architect exam a year ago -- the format has changed since then. The reason I took them out of order is that I do mostly architecting -- which is to say, I only get to write code when I have been very good, or when I can disguise it as a "prototype for something I am thinking about". I really spend most of my time working with Rational Rose and UML and attending meetings. So, in some ways the architect exam was more relevent to me. On the other hand, I dislike "architects" who have no experience with the technoligies they are specifying. So I keep my hand in coding wise.
I know 2 or three other people who took the architect exam first. As a matter of fact, I decided to take the architect exam when I found out that a co-worker was a certified java architect and I thought "well if he can do it, so can i". As far as i know, there isn't a required order to the exams...just a suggested one.
The architect exam I took a year ago struck me as a poor test. too much opinion, and many poorly worded questions. At some point in the RHE book they say something to the effect that the programmer's exam is not an exercise in rhetoric, and they don't have many "trick" questions. I didn't feel that way about the architect exam. It reminded me of the radio show "whadda ya know" where "ambigious or misleading questions are par for the course"
Also, there wasn't much information about the exam and what to study. Jaworski's book had some stuff, but it was a poor reflection of the actual exam and I wouldn't recommend it.
Having said all those bad things about the previous architect exam, the format has now changed (but I am not sure I want to do it over again), so hopefully it is a much better indication of what your knowledge is. So I am not sure my comments above are really relevent any more.
Hope this helps.

Originally posted by Peter Tran:
Leon,
I thought the JAVA certification exams had to be taken in the following order: Programmers -> Developers -> Architect. You're the first person I've read that did it out of order(?). Did you find the Architect exam difficult? Why did you choose to take the Architect exam first?
Regards,
-Peter


17 years ago
I had three or four fill-in-the blank. Several(10-12) multiple choice with 2-3 answers. The rest were radio buttons.
17 years ago
I passed the SCJP this morning (89%). I thought that it was a good test -- much better than the Sun Certified Java2 Architect Exam (which I passed about a year ago). The questions were relatively straight-forward (although not as straight-forward as I think -- else I wouldn't have missed any).
I studied for about 6 weeks, using the KAM and RHE books, and lots of mock exams from Java Ranch. Even though I have been working with Java technologies for several years, I still learned a lot. For example, I usually don't deal with GUIs, so I didn't know much about the AWT framework. So the process was beneficial to me.
The time allowance was 120 minutes. I didn't need near that long. I reviewed every question at least once. Lost at least one question when I tried to be too clever in the review.
I think the advice given at Java Ranch on how to pass the exam is very good -- study and take mock exams.
Thanks much for the Java Ranch site and all the help I got from here.
17 years ago
Here's what the Java Language Specification has to say about this:
"If a class declares a static method, then the declaration of that method is said to *hide* [emphasis in the original text] any and all methods with the same signiture in the superclasses and super interfaces of the class that would otherwise be accessable to the code in the class. A compile-time error occurs if a static method hides an instance method. In this respect, hiding of fields, for it is permissible for a static variable to hide an instance variable.
"A hidden method can be accessed by using a qualified name or by using a method invocation expression that contains the key word super or a cast to the superclass type. In this respect hiding of methods is similar to hiding of fields."
I know more now than I did before...
17 years ago
OOPs.
I saw (and coded) "c += i" rather than c = c+i;
Here is the code:
public class MyTest{
char c = 'c';
int i = 10;
public static void main(String[] args){
MyTest mt = new MyTest();
mt.c += mt.i;
System.out.println(mt.c);
}
}
Sorry for the confusion.
Leon
17 years ago
Here is the question:
Question 48)
Given the following variables
char c = 'c';
int i = 10;
double d = 10;
long l = 1;
String s = "Hello";
Which of the following will compile without error?
1)c=c+i;
2)s+=i;
3)i+=s;
4)c+=s;

Marcus says the only correct answer is 2. However, I am also able to successfully compile and execute answer 1. When I run it, I get the answer "m". Am I missing anything here?
17 years ago