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Andrew Hamilton

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since May 12, 2004
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Recent posts by Andrew Hamilton

I have been a developer for a long time. Too long to mention, probably. I was putting FORTRAN on punch cards in the early 80's. I love doing development and always have. I've done it professionally since the early 90's. I don't get to do it anymore. I've become a Systems Engineer and Architect for very large scale projects. There are jobs out there for you if you have the right kind of experience. I gave up on being a professional developer a few years ago. Most places that want developers, don't want to pay you for your experience anyway. They can get developers with less experience at a far lesser rate that can do the job. Perhaps not as well, but the bean counters believe that the costs associated with the bugs and lack of reliability are less in the long run. Not sure I agree with that but I'm not a bean counter. I only do development now for fun. To keep my skills sharp. I have the experience to do other kinds of things. I think you should probably look at other types of IT positions that take advantage of the experience you've gained. Good luck.
15 years ago
I wouldn't think that this would be an ethical problem. But don't expect to get a good reference from them if you leave them "high and dry". One thing I try to do is give as much notice as I can and try to work with them so that they can get a replacement or can decide for themselves what their options are. If that requires you to work the 15 days and let them pay you for the annual leave then that's probably the best you can do for them. If your new situation requires you to be there quicker than the 15 days, which is unreasonable in my opinion, then you probably don't have a lot of other options. Not knowing what the new situation is, it is difficult to offer more specific advice. Good luck.
15 years ago
Generally speaking, some experience is better than no experience. Companies tend to want folks that have proven themselves. Occasionally they will take a chance on an unknown quantity, but that is fairly rare and I wouldn't bet my life on it. I guess for me it would depend on what "Production Support" meant. If it means writing utility code or documents then that would probably be a good opportunity. If it's help desk type stuff, that would probably be ok too. At least you are in the door and working. You have something to put on your resume. I remember when I had no experience and was looking for a job. I would have taken anything that got me in the door somewhere. After that you make your chances. Take the job. Good luck.
15 years ago
Again, your best bet would be to consolidate the logs at log time instead of trying to get them together at a later time. Small udp packets don't make much impact on the network, but large files going across do. Use a good logger to consolidate to a log host. This is just a good practice in general. If you cannot do this via that method there is a way to do this maybe via RMI but that would depend a lot on your network constraints. My guess is you wouldn't be able to do it anyway. Your network seems paranoid which is not a bad thing, but that makes it difficult to run the servers and clients you would need to do this.
A better idea might be to have your servers log to a central log host. Then process/monitor your logs on that particular host. There are several loggers out there that will do that such as syslog-ng, even the standard syslog that comes on Unix machines will log to different hosts. You can do this via sockets in Java but it would probably be more work than it is worth considering there are open source tools out there that will do the work for you. If you want to have some sort of Swing interface on the front to look at logs on your central host then that is just a matter of reading in the log files and putting together a useful interface...