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Jon Ellison

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since Jan 10, 2001
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Recent posts by Jon Ellison

Ivette,
For some constructive advice... why not post your resume...
If you do not have your own webspace you can use Yahoo! Careers to post your resume...
http://hj.resumes.yahoo.com/
19 years ago
Lance...
You have a good start... I'd like to give you some pointers about Resume Writing... First, let me say that I am not a professional resume author... I have no experience other than writing my own and reading others for the last decade... So take it for what it is worth...
A resume is an organized written presentation of relevant information and accomplishments specifically targeted toward your work/job search objective. It is not, in my opinion, a laundry list of jobs and duties. It is an overview and should not tell everything about you... gotta save something for the interview... Keep in mind that your resume will be read/skimmed in approximately 25 to 35 seconds... So it needs to be clear, direct, effective, professional and easy to read. Bullet points are good to use to facilitate skimming... but I think that you over did it on this resume. Conversely, you want to avoid long paragraphs and large blocks of text.
Keep in mind that your resume is a Sales Brochure and you are the product. It should be written to illustrate what you can do... It is not a biography. Be mindful of your target market and write the resume in your own words. The language in the resume and your verbal presentation should be similar... Write as you speak!
In my opinion you should not include personal information or physical characteristics... Hobbies or interests unless they are related to your job objective... Leave out the "References available upon request"... They know that already...
Also, FYI, The objective statement is seldom used, if ever on a professional resume. It has been replaced by the Summary/Lead-in paragraph... at least that is what the out-placement dudes told me last time I had my resume reviewed..
You might want to get to a public library and checkout some other examples of technical/professional resume writing books... That helped me bunches when I was figuring out what to put in my resume at least it will expose you to different ways you can format your resume...
Good Luck!
19 years ago
Interesting Thread... Here is some more interesting reading for discussion...
Warning: A very long and involved article that hits on the H1-B subject... "Debunking the Myth of a Desperate Software Labor Shortage, Testimony to the U.S. House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee on Immigration." (updated September 2, 2002)
http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/itaa.real.html
19 years ago
For those of you familiar with Ward Cunningham's Portland Repository Wiki Web... Here is an interesting thread along the lines of this topic...
http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?InternationalOutsourcing
Interesting reading...
Jon Ellison
19 years ago
This job is for Lead Developers... don't bother applying if you don't match the requirements perfectly... This recruiter doesn't want to waste your time and his...
I hate recruiters like this... I/you may fit 90% of the requirments but still aren't worthy of a look according to this guy.
NOTE TO RECRUITERS... Don't Hire DIPSTICKS like this to represent your firm.
Job Description
Telecom Client is looking for Lead Developers-(2-3 positions) Must have 7 years of Java, C++ Unix Applications development. 3 years of Team Lead
exp. Will be key interface to Project Manager and Clients Project Coordinator. Must be able to answer most of the questions from staff programmers.
Requirements
7 years of Unix, Java, OOD, C++. GNU C++ compiler exp. Be able to set up sockets and database clients. Java JNI API's and techniques. REXX and OS/2 exp. Solaris experience and a BS in Computer Science. Ability to mentor, teach and work one on one with clients existing staff. AT&T or Lucent exp. A BIG+Additional Info - Must have excellent communications skills. Please send resumes only in word format to ANKUR@PINNACLE-SYS.COM PLEASE DON'T
SEND YOUR RESUME IF YOU DON'T MATCH THE SKILL SET PERFECTLY IT WOULD BE A WASTAGE OF YOUR AND MY TIME.. THANKS
Apply for this Job at:
http://www.net-temps.com/adcgi/jobref.cgi/ajb/pinnsyst/AD0726LD
This job is posted by Net-Temps, Inc. Search over 75,000 jobs, get your free Job Seekers Desktop, and free Resume submittal.
19 years ago
Here are a few for you:
1.why you prefer Java?
Answer: write once ,run anywhere.
2. Name some of the classes which provide the functionality of collation?
Answer: collator, rulebased collator, collationkey, collationelement iterator.
3. Awt stands for? and what is it?
Answer: AWT stands for Abstract window tool kit. It is a is a package that provides an integrated set of classes to manage user interface components.
4. why a java program can not directly communicate with an ODBC driver?
Answer: Since ODBC API is written in C language and makes use of pointers which Java can not support.
5. Are servlets platform independent? If so Why? Also what is the most common application of servlets?
Answer: Yes, Because they are written in Java. The most common application of servlet is to access database and dynamically construct HTTP response
SOURCE: Technical Interview Questions
Hope this helps!
19 years ago
Uh... how about Israel?
19 years ago
Best Wishes to all here and around the world!
Hope the new year brings a brighter future for everyone out there!!

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Jon Ellison
Java Developer at Large
Laid off since 9/11
19 years ago
Peas on Earth...
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Jon Ellison
Java Developer at Large
Laid off since 9/11
19 years ago
Well... after much thought and reflection I think that everyone who says we shouldn't Kill him is right... At least not right away... I think that we should first give him a bucket and a shovel and send him down to ground zero to clean up the mess he made and then when he is done... get him going on laying some bricks! Only when he has finished rebuilding the towers should we then punch his ticket and send him on to Allah to explain what he has done in his (Allah's) name...
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Jon Ellison
Java Developer at Large
Laid off since 9/11
19 years ago
I vote to try him immediately via a public Military Tribunal with sentence to be carried out immediately and publically.
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Jon Ellison
Java Developer at Large
Laid off since 9/11/01
[This message has been edited by Jon Ellison (edited December 14, 2001).]
19 years ago
At the rate you are willing to pay... the only applicants you will see are H1B or folks right out of college without actual job experience... JMHO...
19 years ago
How about this one?
20 years ago
A friend of mine in the aviation industry sent this to me I would like to share it with you all!
ABOARD FLIGHT 564
Peter Hannaford
-----------------------------------------------------------
As it was at most U.S. airports, last Saturday was the first near-normal Day at Denver International since the terrorist attacks. On United's Flight 564 the door had just been locked and the plane was about to pull out of the gate when the captain came on the public address system.
"I want to thank you brave folks for coming out today. We don't have any new instructions from the federal government, so from now on we're on our own."
The passengers listened in total silence.
He explained that airport security measures had pretty much solved the problem of firearms being carried aboard, but not weapons of the type the terrorists apparently used, plastic knives or those fashioned from wood or ceramics.
"Sometimes a potential hijacker will announce that he has a bomb. There are no bombs on this aircraft and if someone were to get up and make that claim, don't believe him.
"If someone were to stand up, brandish something such as a plastic knife and say 'This is a hijacking' or words to that effect here is what you should do: Every one of you should stand up and immediately throw things at that person - pillows, books, magazines, eyeglasses, shoes -anything that will throw him off balance and distract his attention. If he has a confederate or two, do the same with them. Most important: get a blanket
over him, then wrestle him to the floor and keep him there. We'll land the plane at the nearest airport and the authorities will take it from there."
"Remember, there will be one of him and maybe a few confederates, but there are 200 of you. You can overwhelm them.
"The Declaration of Independence says 'We, the people...' and that's just what it is when we're up in the air: we, the people, vs. would-be terrorists. I don't think we are going to have any such problem today or tomorrow or for a while, but some time down the road, it is going to happen again and I want you to know what to do.
"Now, since we're a family for the next few hours, I'll ask you to turn to the folks next to you, introduce yourself, tell them a little about yourself and ask them to do the same."
* * * * * * *
The end of this remarkable speech brought sustained clapping from the passengers. He had put the matter in perspective. If only the passengers on those ill-fated flights last Tuesday had been given the same talk, I thought, they might be alive today. One group on United Flight 93, which crashed in a Pennsylvania field, apparently rushed the hijackers in an attempt to wrest control from them. While they perished, they succeeded in preventing the terrorist from attacking his intended goal, possibly the White House or the Capitol.
Procedures for dealing with hijackers were conceived in a time when the hijackers were usually seeking the release of jailed comrades or a large amount of money. Mass murder was not their goal. That short talk last Saturday by the pilot of Flight 564 should set a new standard of realism.
Every passenger should learn the simple - but potentially life-saving - procedure he outlined. He showed his passengers that a hijacking does not have to result in hopelessness and terror, but victory over the perpetrators.
The Airline Pilots Association, the pilots' union, last week dropped its opposition to stronger cockpit doors and is now calling for retrofits. (It's opposition was based on pilot concerns about getting out easily in emergency situations.) The scandal of easily penetrated airport security will result in congressional calls for a federal takeover of the security system.
Previous efforts to reform security procedures and raise standards have been talked to death. This time, however, no lobbying efforts must be allowed to prevent airport security from getting the reforms that are needed:
federal operation, rigorous training, decent pay and no foreign nationals eligible for employment.
-----------------------------------------------------------
This article was mailed from The Washington Times
20 years ago