Diana Ryan

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since Jan 17, 2001
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Recent posts by Diana Ryan

Translation:
"Brian and Michael, I too studied the Russian language
First Music, then Russian, then Computer Science.
Funny, isn't it?"
Sorry about that. I won't do it again. Will refrain from using German or French as well.
Russian is such a fun language, if any of you have Russian tongue twisters to share, I collect them. I have a few I can share too, of course.
~ Diana
18 years ago
Brian and Michael, ya tozhe izuchala russki yazik.
First Music, then Russian, then Computer Science.
smeshno, da?
~ Diana
18 years ago
Just sent off:
Assignment: Java-4a Say
Attempt: 2
~ Diana
18 years ago
Thanks you guys :^)
So far this has been a really positive experience and I appreciate Marilyn very much too.
I'll see if I can squeeze this in on Thurday and give it a shot.
-Marilyn please go easy on me as I'm a bit intimidated by this one!
~ Diana
18 years ago
Hi All,
I was going at a pretty good pace until I hit Say, formerly 1.4, now 4 I guess... That had to be more than a month ago.
It just didn't look like anything I had ever tried before, is that even useful?? Then got bogged down in work and so that's where I'm stuck. I haven't even given it a first shot yet.
It's encouraging to see that some of you have gotten through that assignment. I guess I just want to see how I would use something like Say in real programming situations. If I want to say this data is equal to that other data, don't I usually pull that out of a database rather than create a bunch of arrays?
Thanks,
~ Diana
18 years ago
Spacing around identifiers is a real sneaky one! I suggest reading that part 3 times! :^) It's not hard to understand, just hard to do consistently if you're not used to it. I made spacing mistakes on all 3 of the assignments I've done so far.
19 years ago
That "is" is like a sign you can see from across the room -hey, boolean over here... when it's used consistently. I like that.
isCentury can be true or false just like any other boolean. It doesn't have to be set to true, just because it says "is". However if you say isNotCentury, I sort of have a problem with that. I don't want to encounter (!isNotCentury), that would tick me off.
P.S. I think you're right, that I encountered this as a rule in some beans document I read. That doesn't mean it isn't useful in other places :^)
How about this for a guideline? If you say "don't got no" in English, you can name your booleans isNotWhatever...
Ok. I am still trying to get a handle on Java variable naming myself. I just realized that sometimes your booleans even though their values are t/f sometimes represent yes/no, which is more difficult for the "is" thing. boolean approveOrder would have muddled meaning if I tried to say isApproveOrder. I still prefer to keep in in the positive though. At least that part can be consistent.
[This message has been edited by Diana Ryan (edited February 08, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Diana Ryan (edited February 08, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Diana Ryan (edited February 08, 2001).]
19 years ago
Somewhere, in some Java book or style guide or something (I'm currently reading 4 books so I can't remember what came frome where - sorry) I did read that it is highly recommended to use "is" in a boolean variable or maybe it was a method that returns a boolean value. And anyway I have been exposed to quite a bit of working Java code lately as well that definitely always uses "is" in booleans. So, even though I don't know where this comes from, I definitely have a sense that it isn't just nitpicker opinion, it's more of a conventional usage to use "is". If I figure out where I actually saw I'll let you know, but it wasn't here.
19 years ago
Ok. I'm still very new to coding Java (20 days), so the only Style Guides I've seen are the Java Ranch Style Guide and Rogue Wave's.
~ Diana
19 years ago
Hi. Not trying to butt in here... I hope I'm not unwelcome on this thread.
In my own efforts to get hip to the industry standards, I picked up a book called The Elements of Java Style written by seven programmers from Rogue Wave Software (in Boulder). Consists of 108 rules, glossary and index. Very small, a quick read and a great format for reference.
I was just wondering if Paul or Marilyn had seen it, or what you thought of it. There are some inconsistencies with the guidelines here at Java Ranch. Some that I like (I think the braces style we use here is much more readable than braces that begin at the end of a line) and some that I don't like (I prefer all caps for constants). And there's stuff here that is never mentioned there, like spacing issues. And there's stuff there that isn't mentioned here, too many things to mention, but it's all very interesting.
I was wondering if Paul or Marilyn had seen The Elements of Java Style, and what you think of it.
~ Diana
P.S. I understand the title's similarity to Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style" is intentional.
[This message has been edited by Diana Ryan (edited January 28, 2001).]
19 years ago
Hi.
I have been struggling with the same question for about 4 years.
I've read a lot of hype about Java, I know there's demand for Java programmers and I know that that one language will earn you more money than I earn as a web developer, even though I have just about every other web skill you can name, at least 3 of which are languages, and a couple being "languages" only if you call pig-latin a language :^)
I can trade in the Perl CGI scripts and ASP for JSP, but I'm not really sure I want to. I'm comfortable with Perl and VBScript, and comfortable with IIS and I really honestly do not want to reboot the server every time I change something. I can do applets, but there are STILL browser compatibility and bandwidth issues.
So what exactly is the point? Respect? Money? Maybe the joy of compiling, and the beautiful pain of learning something new. Java is just this language that wants to be everything to everyone. A floorwax AND a dessert topping. For a web developer, that actually kind of makes sense.
~ Diana

19 years ago
I am new to Java, and for Java I like Kawa. (http://www.allaire.com/products/Kawa/index.cfm, or go to download.com).
It's really nice because I'm not interested in a JBuilder type tool that generates the code for me, but I also don't want to have to go out to a DOS window to compile. Using Kawa, I can hit F7 to compile, hit F4 to run, and see the results of each(errors / no errors / program output) in a little window at the bottom.
It has "pretty printing", or whatever you call the feature that color-codes, it doesn't do anything funky (ever use WinEdit, which places your cursor at the top of the block of stuff you pasted, only you normally expect it at the bottom?), and it lines up the braces for you (I like mine stacked, like the Style Guide here suggests). It has other nice features too, stuff I'm not really using yet.
This is my first post here, so "Hello, World!" Just thought I would try to contribute something helpful.
~ Diana
19 years ago