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Sanjeev Arya

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Recent posts by Sanjeev Arya

Originally posted by faisal mahmood:
I am interested to know the answer as I have already passed, SCJP2, IBM-UML and SCWCD
Please reply asap.
Faisal


As far as what I know at this time, SCWCD is not a part of jCert.
cheers
Sanjeev

Just wondering if Javaranch is going to have a WLS certification forum (heard some rumors)...
Meanwhile, here is my vote of affirmation, for starting a WLS certification forum.
Sanjeev
18 years ago

Effective Java, the book I mentioned earlier, is reviewed pretty favorably at the Javaranch Bunkhouse itself! check here:
http://www.javaranch.com/bunkhouse/bunkhouseAdvanced.jsp
Sanjeev

Originally posted by Frank Carver:

...
For me, Kent Beck's "XP Explained: Embrace Change" definately counts as a classic book. I don't use it as a reference any more, but I do urge all my developer colleagues to understand what it contains and what it means. And I've lent it out more than any other book I own!
My short list of other classics would also include:


  • The Pragmatic Programmer (metioned above)
  • Programming Pearls by Jon Bentley
  • Peopleware (mentioned above)
  • Design Patterns (mentioned above)
  • The Mythical Man Month (mentioneed above)

  • I deliberately don't include books which are too specific to particular languages or technologies. "Refactoring" is a good book, but it is too specific to Java for this list (just as it's predecessor - Kent Beck's "SmallTalk best Practice Patterns" - is too specific to SmallTalk) Where is the language-independent refactoring book? Likewise "UML Distilled" is easily my favourite UML book, but in many ways UML is just another language, albeit a pictorial one.
    I encourage people to check out "Programming Pearls", though. The original edition used to be my most-lent-out book. Until it never came back


I agree with Frank on the value of being XP-aware. Another thing often overlooked in evaluating XP values is the value of small and short projects. Huge projects are not necessarily the only metric for evaluation here. Even if a large project completes successfully , is 1 large project more valuable than 5 shorter projects?
However, I disagree with Frank on "Refactoring". The information there is not "specific to Java" and can be applied to most OO languages. Only the examples are in Java, but I can still apply, say, the "Move Method" pattern in C++ or C# as much as in Java.
Now, outside this OO collection, I would like to ask people to review "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch (one of Sun's elite and APIs architect). Its a tiny little book (200 odd pages) with 50 or so gems on using Java (and OO in general) effectively. Written in the style of "Pragmatic Programmer" with short, 3-4 page chapters in very simple english. The only reason I am hesitant to put it on the list is that, as Frank mentions, its shelf-life would be tied to that of Java. Just like I would't want to put an "Effective VB" book on the list, I wouldn't put this one, but it remains one heck of a book! Try it.
I haven't checked "Programming Pearls" yet. One criteria for my list is to keep it short and avoid overlap as much as possible because of obvious budget reasons . Is the advice in this book any similar to Pragmatic Programmer or the like?
Thanks
Sanjeev

Originally posted by Alan Shalloway:
... Actually, while I'm at it (I can anticipate the question now i'll list some of my favorite books:
UML Distilled
XP Explained
Refactoring


Alan, thanks for reminding ...
I have just updated my dream collection and revived that low-lying thread in this forum. Take a look, all the books you mentioned here, are present in that brief list of 7 books! I polled people in this forum, then visited bookstores and compiled a hit-list. If it ever grows bigger than, say 10, I would take UML Distilled away .
regards
Sanjeev
Hi,
I am reviving this thread again to add a book I consider a personal favorite (Larman), of course I haven't read this week's giveaway yet . I almost took "UML Distilled" away from the list because Larman's book covers almost all of the UML typically needed but left it in the list for the time being.
Here's the final list:
1. Design Patterns (GoF)
2. Refactoring (Martin Fowler)
3. Extreme Programming Explained (Kent Beck)
4. The Pragmatic Programmer (Andrew Hunt, Dave Thomas)
5. UML Distilled (Martin Fowler)
6. Surviving O-O Projects (Alistair Cockburn)
7. Applying UML and Patterns (Craig Larman)
cheers
Sanjeev
Miftah,
I have used GoF and browsed thru some others (specifically those with "Java" and "Patterns" both in their title). Personally, I did not like anything better than this:
Applying UML and Patterns by Craig Larman.
It would be with you for as long as OOAD lives because he talk about Pattern fundamentals. Absolute bare minimum principles that make up even the GoF patterns. Now that every one is creating patterns with different names, you would be on good grounds if you learnt the fundamentals from Larman's book and recognize the motivations behind various patterns. He calls them the GRASP principles and explains most of the famous patterns as being made up of these fundamental building blocks. Larman's book is phenomenal as it also describes where Patterns and UML fit in the whole process.
It is sad to see that Larman's book is categorized primarily as a UML book and not a Patterns book. Nobody except James discussed it here in this thread!
Enough said. Now, go to a bookstore, pick up GoF book and Larman's book, and any other book on patterns. Go with your heart.
Hope it helps
Sanjeev

Originally posted by Michal Harezlak:
Sanjeev,
Off topic: I am not sure if you right here, you can find similarities but they are not exactly same things. Check your sources and let me know if you want to continue about it.
Best regards.


Mike,
I did not have an "equivalent" or "approximately equal" symbol on this keyboard I am sure you get the drift when I mention those "similar" patterns. Of course, I have missed many many more patterns which have great great overlap.
Sanjeev

Originally posted by Alan Shalloway:

...
If your solution is more cohesive, more loosely coupled, more easily modifiable, easier to understand, then it is better. If it is not, it is not better.
...


Alan, I agree with you.
High cohesion, Loose coupling ... are all like basic building blocks which can be combined in various ways to achieve high-level design patterns like the GoF or J2EE patterns. This is exactly what Craig Larman mentions in his classic "Applying UML and Patterns". I actually found the section on GRASP Patterns (based on simple principles such as coupling, cohesion...) in his book a must-read.
If one understands the very basic principles, such as the GRASP, then there is little need to "memorize" other patterns such as the GoF. They should flow automatically or appear through refactoring.
I especially found the GRASP patterns useful because they keep the cluttered vocabulary (the very thing Design Patterns are credited to have facilitated) away. I found there are synonyms of the basic GRASP concepts in different group's patterns such as: Facade=Controller, Wrapper=Decorator, Value Object=Proxy... I am waiting to see more synonyms once the .NET patterns come out
Sanjeev

Originally posted by Axel Janssen:
Hi,
...
If you use tomcat, its in the tomcat files:
<tomcatPath>\webapps\tomcat-docs\servletapi\index.html
...
Axel


Thanks Axel. That helps a lot!
18 years ago

Isn't that sad?
Seems like Sun is having trouble maintaining its plethora of links (many duplicated) to the tons of APIs, tutorials, whitepapers, downloads etc on its website, and has finally decided that the best way is to stop providing javadocs to its APIs online.
Just an observation...
Sanjeev
18 years ago
Hi,
I can find a hyperlink to the servlet 2.3 API at the Sun web site but not the JSP 1.2 API. Can someone provide a link to it?
All I can find at Sun is links for downloading PDF or PS versions.
Thanks
Sanjeev
18 years ago
Hi,
I am curious to know if the SCWCD exam is equivalent to any jCert exam level, such as 2b?
Thanks
Sanjeev
Hi all,
I got a reply from IBM yesterday stating that the new exam date is not yet finalized. However, the approximate release date seems to be "November or December", according to the letter.
This is so confusing... Wait till November, and the new test date might be March! OR, Take the test now, and the new test is released 60 days later!
Anyways, just wanted to share the info. Good luck.
cheers
Sanjeev

Last time I checked the IBM website had absolutely no indication of the new format. I am hoping they do update the website before the actual overhaul with info regarding when to expect that change. That will help us decide whether or how long to wait.
I have also sent that site's webmaster a mail. No replies yet. Lets see.
cheers
Sanjeev