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Image from Mike Murach & Associates
Title: Murach’s Android Programming
Author(s): Joel Murach
Publisher: Mike Murach & Associates
Category: Web design, HTML and JavaScript


Summary

Mike Murach & Associates wrote:If you know how to program in Java, this is the first book you should buy for learning how to develop Android apps the way the pros do. First, it shows how to set up a professional development environment. Then, it presents a series of complete Android apps that illustrate key skills…fragments, services, broadcast receivers, SQLite databases, content providers, Google Maps, and much more! Once you finish this book, the competing books will make more sense.




Book Preview (when available)



From the publisher
  • Table of Contents (PDF)
  • Chapter 1: An Introduction to Android Programming (PDF)
  • Book Applications and Exercises (EXE for Windows or ZIP for any system)
  • Corrections (PDF)




  • Where to get it?
  • Amazon.com
  • Mike Murach & Associates



  • Related Threads
  • Joel explains the approach used in the book
  • Joel explains working effectively with CRUD operations in Android


  • Related Websites
  • Interview with Joel Murach on InfoQ
  • COMMENTS:
     
    Sheriff
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    "Murach's Android Programming" is a good introduction into Android programming. The book requires only basic Java knowledge, and it shows at times. The book sometimes spends a bit too much time explaining code snippets that should be clear for anyone experienced in Java.

    The chapters discuss several controls and techniques, using good example apps. Unlike the previous Android book I read this book doesn't stop at the UI, but also explains how to write back-ground services and listen to broadcast events. After reading this book you will be able to write small-scale programs without much trouble.

    That said, there are two things that annoyed me about this book:
    1) When discussing releasing apps, the book mentions several billing options but then only descrives publishing free applications. When referring to in-app billing or adds, the book literally says "To learn how to add XXX to your app, you can start by searching for "XXX" in the Android documentation". I expected a bit more coverage for these topics. The book might as well not even mentioned the possibilities.
    2) The first 16 chapters discuss several topics for creating apps. Chapter 17 then discusses publishing these apps, only for chapter 18 to follow with another possible feature to apps (map support). It's like "you now can create and publish any app you want. Oh wait, here's one thing we forgot". Chapter 18 doesn't refer to chapter 17 in any way, so it wouldn't have been hard to swap the two around. That way, the book first discusses all technical aspects followed by publishing. That would have made more sense to me.


    I give this book 8 out of 10 horseshoes.

    ---
    Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.
     
    Bartender
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    Rob Spoor wrote:"Murach's Android Programming" is a good introduction into Android programming.


    This may not be the right place for this question, in which case feel free to move it.

    I notice you gave it 8/10, so IYO are there any better books about Android out there?

    I ask because it's something I'm interested in - partly because I hope it will make me less of a "Smartphone Luddite".

    Winston
     
    Rob Spoor
    Sheriff
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    I've read only two Android books, this one and Android User Interface Development: Beginner's Guide. While I have given the latter 9 out of 10, it's limited to user interfaces and includes just little code. Therefore I would prefer this one overall.

    Note that there's a 2nd edition out, which includes at least the switch from Eclipse to Android Studio (based on IntelliJ) as the IDE to use. I'm currently reviewing that one, but I don't think it's that different so far.
     
    author & internet detective
    Marshal
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    Rating: I give this book 9 out of 10 horseshoes.

    "Murach's Android Programming" follows the style we've come to expect from a Murach book. One side of the page is text description. The other is images, tables and bullet points. This approach lets them deliver on the same book being for both training and reference.

    The only pre-requisite listed for reading the book is basic Java. This is true - the book explains everything else - XML, databases, etc. Chapter 1 moves fast to give an overview, but the book circles back and covers everything in depth.

    I particularly liked the parts on how to debug and use the emulator. There was very strong coverage of core concepts throughout. I liked that the database overview covered SQL injection. The screens of layouts and widgets were a good use of pictures.

    The only thing that didn't feel smooth to me was that I couldn't find a picture of a D-Pad. Or rather I couldn't find one that was labeled that way. (The first reference to a D-Pad was on page 54.) This is minor and it's good when your biggest gripe about a book is something trivial!

    "Murach's Android Programming" is a great way to learn how to write your first Android app. You'll get started quickly and then have a reference when you need idioms or how-to's for that app and later ones.

    ---
    Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.

    More info at Amazon.com

    Review migrated from old book review post
     
    Bartender
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    Rating: I give this book 8 out of 10 horseshoes

    Murach's books are more oriented towards practical learning and this one's no different. The book covers the topics in an order and has grouped topics in accordance to their level of complexity and use. The author has chosen appropriate examples to explain these different groups of topics. The examples are not mere use this component that component and print out something, instead they are quite useful and closer to real-world applications.

    This is a complete guide to Android programming and I would strongly suggest anyone who wants to learn Android programming to pick this book. The screenshots showing the application layout, IDE options are all very clear. Also there is a very clear appendix which I found to be really useful to setup your Android Development environment. I found the state diagram explaining the states of an Activity to be very clear and it didn't require me to read anything more to understand it.

    This book though assumes that you are already familiar with Java, so if you want to learn Java you can pick Murach's Java Programming or any other famous books like Head First Java.

    ---
    Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.
     
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    Thread Boost - a very different sort of advertising
    https://coderanch.com/t/674455/Thread-Boost-feature
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