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Image from Amazon
Title: Transitioning to Java: Kickstart your polyglot programming journey by getting a clear understanding of Java
Author(s): Ken Fogel
Publisher: Packt
Category: Beginning Java

Amazon wrote:This comprehensive guide will help non-Java developers already using different languages transition from their current language to all things Java. The chapters are designed in a way that re-enforces a developer's existing knowledge of object-oriented methodologies as they apply to Java.

This book has been divided into four sections, with each section touching upon different aspects that'll enable your effective transition. The first section helps you get to grips with the Java development environment and the Maven build tool for modern Java applications. In the second section, you'll learn about Java language fundamentals, along with exploring object-oriented programming (OOP) methodologies and functional programming and discovering how to implement software design patterns in Java. The third section shows you how to code in Java on different platforms and helps you get familiar with the challenges faced on these platforms. In the fourth section, you'll find out how you can manage and package your Java code.

By the end of this Java programming book, you'll have learned the core concepts of Java that'll help you successfully transition from a different language to Java.



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    author & internet detective
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    “Transitioning to Java” is meant for those who already know another imperative language such as C# or JavaScript) and are learning Java. As a result, it moves fast since the focus is more on syntax, Java concepts and the ecosystem rather than what a loop is.

    The explanation of Java licensing is excellent. I like that Ken describes the four major IDEs for Java and includes tips on what to consider in choosing one. I enjoyed seeing jshell introduced before how to compile. And that both the two step procedure and single file source code execution were shown as alternatives. The instructions for how to install were excellent with callouts for whether of not you have admin access to the computer.

    The book covers real world tools including Maven and Docker. Other advanced topics like concurrency, JavaFX are covered as well. I particularly liked the chapter on BigDecimal and JUnit 5. I liked the Python example highlighting what happens if you don't have static typing. The patterns section was great with explanations and code for each SOLID principle. Additionally, the explanation of thread safe singletons was great. My absolute favorite was including ParameterizedTest in the JUnit 5 part. (I would have liked MethodSource in addition to CSVSource, but that's totally personal preference.)

    The definitions, table sand screenshots are all excellent. I appreciate that the code is in a GitHub repo for ease in copy/pasting when trying the examples.

    There were a few minor formatting type things in the code. Some stray // with no comment after them in the compound interest examples near the beginning. In one case “Var” vs “var”. The package names were long enough to require two lines in the book for imports. A shorter name would have made this easier to read. Nothing that prevents understanding so definitely minor.

    One thing that felt strange is the “software/hardware covered in this book” table in the intro. First of all, nothing in the table is hardware. Secondly, I'm not clear on the purpose of the table. It's not the software required for the book (the reader doesn't need both Java 17 and 19), it's not what you need to install to get started (some software isn't used til the very end), and it isn't a list of what the author used with “A text editor of your choice” on the list. I think it is what you will eventually need to install if you want to run all the examples? Each chapter begins with what software you need if you want to follow along. Almost all of them say Java 17/Maven/text editor. The one chapter mentioning Java 19 lists it inside the chapter.

    In any case, I definitely recommend this book for those moving from another language to Java. It covers a lot and can get you up to speed quickly. Each chapter even ends with links for further reading if you want to dive deeper into something. Plus there was a moose in some of the examples. How perfect here at the Ranch!

    I give this book 8 out of 10 horseshoes.

    I received a complementary copy from the publisher in exchange for writing this review.
     
    Greenhorn
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    I highly recommend this book for those transitioning to Java.
     
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    Hi everyone.

    Transitioning to Java is my first book. I believe that it is unique in that expects the reader to already be skilled in another programming language. It is why I refer to the book as a beginner's book for experts. There are code samples that back every chapter. To get the most from the book you should clone the samples. They are all Maven based so can be run from the command line or any IDE. You decide which way you want to work. The book moves quite fast in that it begins with what you download to work with Java and ends with packaging a Java Server Faces application in a Docker container.

    I look forward to answering any questions.

    Ken
     
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    Hi, JR Members - I've been away from Java for nearly 20 years, right after getting SCJP (1.4) and the Oracle takeover of Sun. I'm looking for a book that can help me catch up with the features and changes made since then (really, up to Java 8) because I have a Java project I've been assigned to in work. Has anyone in the forum read this one, or maybe have an alternative suggestion for catching up? I prefer print books in an effort to preserve what remains of my eyesight from staring at monitors for so many years, and I don't need to read a beginner's "how to program" book. Thanks!
     
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